1-17 of 17 results  for:

  • Renaissance and Mannerism x
  • Sculpture and Carving x
  • Interior Design and Furniture x
Clear all

Article

Sophie Page

Astrology is the art of predicting events on earth as well as human character and disposition from the movements of the planets and fixed stars. Medieval astrology encompassed both general concepts of celestial influence, and the technical art of making predictions with horoscopes, symbolic maps of the heavens at particular moments and places constructed from astronomical information. The scientific foundations of the art were developed in ancient Greece, largely lost in early medieval Europe and recovered by the Latin West from Arabic sources in the 12th and 13th centuries. Late medieval astrological images were successfully Christianized and were adapted to particular contexts, acquired local meanings and changed over time....

Article

Italian stuccoist, sculptor, painter and costume designer, active in France and England. He worked in France as a painter (1515–22), probably under Jean Perréal and Jean Bourdichon, then in Mantua, possibly under Giulio Romano, possibly calling himself ‘da Milano’. By 1532 he was at ...

Article

Darius Sikorski

Italian stuccoist and sculptor. He enjoyed extensive patronage from the court of Guidobaldo II della Rovere, Duke of Urbino, for whom he modelled fireplaces and entire ceilings representing allegories of princely prerogative and aristocratic supremacy. This practice, unusual in Italy (where stucco was generally a decorative adjunct to fresco), may be partly explained by the fact that Guidobaldo did not retain a permanent court painter....

Article

Gordon Campbell

In ancient Greek art, a sculpture of a young woman carrying a basket on her head. The motif was subsequently adopted in architectural decoration (sometimes with a young man instead of a woman) and in furniture from the Renaissance and later periods.

Article

Cassone  

Ellen Callmann and J. W. Taylor

Term used for large, lavishly decorated chests made in Italy from the 14th century to the end of the 16th. The word is an anachronism, taken from Vasari (2/1568, ed. G. Milanesi, 1878–85, ii, p. 148), the 15th-century term being forziero. Wealthy households needed many chests, but the ornate ...

Article

Kathryn A. Charles

Italian sculptor and stuccoist. Noted for his decorative work, trophies, masks and stucco ornaments, he was trained in the style of Michelangelo by Andrea Ferrucci in Florence. His first independent commission, the tomb of Raffaelle Maffei (il Volterrano) in S Lino at Volterra (...

Article

Paul Barolsky

Italian painter, stuccoist and sculptor. Much of the fascination of his career resides in the development of his style from provincial origins to a highly sophisticated manner, combining the most accomplished elements of the art of Michelangelo, Raphael and their Mannerist followers in a distinctive and highly original way. He provided an influential model for numerous later artists in Rome....

Article

German sculptor, medallist, cabinetmaker, woodcutter and designer. It has been conjectured on stylistic grounds that between 1515 and 1518 he was active in Augsburg and worked in Hans Daucher’s workshop on the sculptural decoration (destr.) of the Fugger funerary chapel in St Anna. His early style was formed by the Italianism of Daucher and of Hans Burgkmair I and also by a journey to Italy in ...

Article

Henri Zerner

Term that encompasses work in a wide variety of media, including painting, sculpture, stuccowork and printmaking, produced from the 1530s to the first decade of the 17th century in France (e.g. The Nymph of Fontainebleau). It evokes an unreal and poetic world of elegant, elongated figures, often in mythological settings, as well as incorporating rich, intricate ornamentation with a characteristic type of strapwork. The phrase was first used by ...

Article

Elisabeth Gurock

German cabinetmaker and wood-carver. Although in the high quality of his craftsmanship he was an important representative of South German cabinetmaking and is thought to have produced an extensive oeuvre in Upper Swabia and Switzerland, little evidence of it has survived. Probably in collaboration with the Augsburg cabinetmaker ...

Article

Bruce Boucher

Italian stuccoist and sculptor. He probably trained as a founder under his father, Guido Minio (fl 1511–16), called Lizzaro, and later alternated this trade with his work as a sculptor. His first documented activity is as a stuccoist in 1533, employed on the vault of the chapel of S Antonio in Il Santo, Padua, under the architect ...

Article

Philippe Rouillard

Italian sculptor, stuccoist and painter, active in France. He was a pupil of Giovanni Francesco Rustici, whom he accompanied to France, and he is usually identified as the ‘Laurent Regnauldin’ recorded from 1534 as a Florentine painter at the château of Fontainebleau. His actual role seems to have been that of a sculptor and stucco modeller in the team of artists directed by ...

Article

Leo de Ren

Flemish sculptor, stuccoist and ornament-maker, active in Germany. He may have received his early training in the studio of his uncles Georges Robyn and Johann II Robyn. He emigrated to Germany c. 1570. His oldest known work is the family tomb of Hendrik von Wiltberg...

Article

Italian sculptor, stuccoist and bronze-caster. His work was considered to be by two artists until Keutner (1991–2) proposed that Carlo di Cesari and Carlo Pallago were the same person. Most of his creative career was spent working at the courts of German princes; so far his name has been connected with surviving works only north of the Alps. He is documented as working, in his early years, as an assistant to ...

Article

French sculptor, stuccoist and painter. He was incorrectly identified by Vasari as Paolo Ponzio Trebatti, a Tuscan sculptor. In documents he identified himself as a French sculptor: ‘Io Ponsio Francese’. He probably trained in Italy, perhaps in the circle of Francesco Primaticcio, and is named as a member of the Accademia di S Luca in Rome in ...

Article

Maria Helena Mendes Pinto

Spanish wood-carver and cabinetmaker, active in Portugal. He was the nephew of Vasco de la Zarza, a Castilian sculptor working in Ávila and Toledo during the first quarter of the 16th century, and Sarça is mentioned as the maker of furniture for the royal household. His best-known works are the Renaissance choir-stalls (...

Article

Thomas Martin

Italian sculptor, stuccoist and architect. He was a pupil and collaborator of Jacopo Sansovino and in the second half of the 16th century became one of the most important sculptors active in Venice. He was by temperament more of a modeller than a carver, and his stuccos, bronzes and terracottas are characterized by a verve and warmth that his work in marble tends to lack. His fluent, innovative and expressive style is in many ways opposed to Sansovino’s thoughtful, classicizing, High Renaissance idiom. Vittoria’s portrait sculpture is particularly fine. In his altars and funerary monuments he gradually evolved a dynamic relationship between sculptural and architectural elements that was more fully explored by artists of the Baroque. Comparatively little is known of Vittoria’s work as an architect. Although he is known to have been active also as a painter, none of his paintings has been identified. His workshop was clearly extensive. His principal collaborators were his nephews ...