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Article

Chinese, 17th century, male.

Painter. Figures.

Chen Xian worked for the Huangbo sect around 1635-1675. He painted many Buddhist figures.

Article

Chinese, 17th century, male.

Born in Jiaxing (Zhejiang).

Painter. Figures, landscapes.

Ding Yuangong was active at the beginning of the Qing dynasty (1644-1911). He later became a Buddhist monk.

London (British Mus.): Hermit in Red Robe on Mountain Ledge (album leaf, signed...

Article

Chinese, 16th – 17th century, male.

Born 1547, in Xiuning (Anhui); died after 1628.

Painter. Figures, landscapes.

Ding Yunpeng painted mainly Buddhist and Taoist figures in the style of the Tang painters Wu Daozi (active c.720-760) and Li Longmian, notably in his way of outlining with the brush. He was connected with the painter Dong Qichang (...

Article

Stephen Addiss

Japanese Zen monk, painter and calligrapher. He entered the Shingon-sect temple Kansōji at the age of four or five, transferring to the Sōtō-sect Zen temple Chōgenji a few years later. Around the age of 16 he moved to the leading Sōtō temple in eastern Japan, Sōrinji. After completing his Zen training, perhaps in ...

Article

Hongren  

Vyvyan Brunst and James Cahill

Chinese painter and Chan Buddhist monk. He is best known by his Buddhist name, Hongren; his secular name was Jiang Tao. Considered one of the Four Great Painter-Monks of the late Ming (1368–1644) period, he in fact reached the height of his artistic activity between ...

Article

Hualin  

Chinese, 17th century, male.

Born 1597, in Sanshan (Fujian); died 1667.

Painter.

A Buddhist monk, Hualin left for Japan in 1660, where he became a priest. Many of his landscapes and flower and bamboo paintings are thus to be found in Japan.

Article

Kokan  

Japanese, 17th – 18th century, male.

Born 1653; died 1717.

Painter.

Kokan, who became the superior at the Hoon-ji temple in Kyoto, studied painting with Eino (1631-1697). He specialised in Buddhist themes as well as humorous subjects verging on caricature.

Article

Kuncan  

Joseph Tsenti Chang and Chu-Tsing Li

Chinese painter and Buddhist monk. He is known as one of the ‘Four Great Monk Painters’ of the early Qing dynasty (1644–1911), along with Shitao or Daoji, Zhu Da and Hongren, and as one of the greatest ‘Individualist’ painters of the 17th century (a group of artists that is always counterposed with the so-called ‘Orthodox’ painters of the 17th century)....

Article

LI Lin  

Chinese, 17th century, male.

Activec.1635.

Born in Siming (Zhejiang).

Painter.

Li Lin was a pupil of Ding Yunpeng (f. 1584-1638). He painted Buddhist figures in black and white, and liked to sign his work Longmian Housheng (Longmian returned to life).

Cologne (Mus. für ostasiatische Kunst): ...

Article

Cecil H. Uyehara

Japanese Shinto–Shingon Buddhist priest, painter and calligrapher. Together with Konoe Nobutada and Hon’ami Kōetsu (see Hon’ami family, §1), he is known as one of the three Kan’ei no Sanpitsu (‘Three Brushes of the Kan’ei era’ (1624–44)). He began his religious training at the age of 17 at Mt Otoko, near Kyoto, at the Shinto–Shingon Buddhist sanctuary of Iwashimizu Hachimangu, of which he became abbot in ...

Article

Elizabeth Horton Sharf

Chinese monk, calligrapher, painter and poet. He was the second abbot of Manpukuji and a prominent early patriarch of Ōbaku Zen Buddhism in Japan. Together with Ingen Ryūki (Yinyuan Longqi) and Sokuhi Nyoitsu (Jifei Ruyi), he became known as one of the Three Brushes of Ōbaku (Ōbaku no Sanpitsu), noted master Zen calligraphers (...

Article

Patricia J. Graham

Naturalized Japanese painter and Buddhist monk. Itsunen first came to Nagasaki from China, as a trader in Chinese medicines, in 1642. In 1644 he entered Kōfukuji, becoming its third abbot in 1645. Itsunen sought to increase the presence of the Chinese Chan (Jap. Zen) community in Japan, and, after repeated invitations, he persuaded the 33rd abbot of Wanfusi at Huangbo (Fujian Prov.), ...

Article

Burglind Jungmann

Korean painter of the Chosŏn period (1392–1910). He is best known for his Sŏn (Chin. Chan.; Jap. Zen) Buddhist figure painting and was by profession a court painter (hwawŏn), as were his father Han Sŏn-guk (b 1602) and his son-in-law ...

Article

Stephen Addiss

Japanese Zen monk, painter and calligrapher. One of the most influential monks of the early 17th century, he was a painter and calligrapher in the Zen tradition (see Japan, §VI, 4, (vii)). He was born to a farming family and entered the Buddhist order at the age of eight, later studying Zen with the master Shun’oku Sōen (...

Article

Sotei  

Japanese, 17th century, male.

Born 1590; died 1662.

Painter.

Sotei painted Buddhist subjects. His successors used the same artist name.

Article

Chinese, 17th century, male.

Active in Quanzhou (Fujian Province) c. 1625-1650.

Painter.

Wang Jianzhang painted landscapes in the style of Dong Yuan (active in the 10th century) and Buddhist figures in the style of Li Gongli (1040-1106). Most of his surviving works are in Japan....

Article

Chinese, 16th – 17th century, male.

Active in Nanjing 1565-1630.

Born in Xiexian (Anhui).

Painter.

Zheng Zhong painted landscapes and Buddhist figures.

London (British Mus.): Sakyamuni (signed and dated 1568)

Taipei (National Palace Mus.): several works

Article

Chinese, 16th – 17th century, male.

Born 1574, in Jingling (Hubei); died 1624.

Painter. Landscapes.

Zhong Xing, a Chan Buddhist, was a poet and head of the school of poetry in Jingling.

Article

Zhou XI  

Chinese, 17th century, female.

Active during the second half of the 17th century.

Painter. Religious subjects, portraits.

Zhou Xi was the daughter of Zhou Rongqi. She painted Buddhist figures.

Taipei (National Palace Mus.): Ten Portraits of Arhats (album)