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American, 19th century, male.

Born 1796, in Wilkes-Barre (Pennsylvania); died 1872, in Jersey City (New Jersey).

Painter (gouache), watercolourist, draughtsman, illustrator, lithographer. Portraits, genre scenes, local scenes, hunting scenes, animals, landscapes.

Hudson River School.

George Catlin was educated as a lawyer and practised in Philadelphia for two years. He then turned to art study and became a portrait painter in New York City. In the 1820s he decided that he would make it his life's work to record the life and culture of American Indians living on the Plains and in ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 19 December 1804, in Gloucester (Massachusetts); died 14 August 1865, in Gloucester.

Painter, engraver, illustrator. Seascapes, landscapes.

Hudson River School.

Fitz Hugh Lane was partially disabled, and learned drawing and lithography from an engraver in Boston. He worked in advertising between 1830 and 1840 and then devoted himself to pictorial art. He travelled to Boston and in Maine, painting seascapes. He belonged to the second generation of the Hudson River School and liked to reproduce the effects of light on water....

Article

Phyllis Braff

(b Bolton, Lancs, Feb 12, 1837; d Santa Barbara, CA, Aug 26, 1926).

American painter, printmaker, and illustrator, of English birth. His brothers Edward (1829–1901), John (1831–1902), and Peter (1841–1914) were also artists. The family emigrated from England and settled in Philadelphia in 1844. At age 16 Moran was apprenticed to the wood-engraving firm Scattergood and Telfer, but he also began to produce watercolours that sold well. In an exchange arrangement with a book dealer, Moran acquired editions of important engravings, including Claude Lorrain’s Liber Veritatis and J. M. W. Turner’s Liber Studiorum. These served as formative influences for his career as a landscape painter, and contributed to his lifelong concern with pictorial structure and compositional devices. His study of oil painting was guided by his brother Edward, and by Edward’s acquaintance, the marine painter James Hamilton.

Moran’s interest in evocative natural settings led to a trip to Lake Superior in 1860 and to a series of paintings and prints featuring that region’s dramatic configurations of rocks and shoreline. In ...