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Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 17 March 1885, in La Ferté-Vidame (Eure-et-Loir); died 1953.

Painter, ceramicist, glassmaker.

Art Nouveau.

Gabriel Argy-Rousseau studied at the school of ceramics in Sèvres. He participated in the Salon d'Automne between 1920 and 1924, and exhibited glassware and enamel work at the Salon des Artistes Français in ...

Article

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 14 April 1868, in Hamburg; died 27 February 1940, in Berlin.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver, architect, designer, decorative artist, graphic designer. Posters, furniture, wallpaper, carpets, glassware, ceramics, table services, jewellery, silverwork, objets d'art, typefaces.

Jugendstil, functional school.

Die Sieben (Group of Seven), Deutscher Werkbund...

Article

German, 19th century, male.

Born 19 November 1865, in Hamburg; died 11 June 1902, in Badenweiler.

Painter, decorative artist, illustrator, engraver, designer, ceramicist, textile designer. Portraits, landscapes, flowers. Designs for stained glass, designs for tapestries, ex-libris plates, advertising posters, fabrics, ceramics, metal objects, ironware, lamps, furniture, typefaces, jewellery, wallpaper...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 1846, in Nancy; died 1904, in Nancy.

Painter, ceramicist, decorative designer, glassmaker. Figures, still-lifes.

Art Nouveau.

Nancy School.

He studied art in Weimar. Émile Gallé was passionately interested in painting on glass and opened a glassware factory in Nancy in ...

Article

Elisabeth Lebovici

(Charles Martin)

(b Nancy, May 4, 1846; d Nancy, Sept 23, 1904).

French glassmaker, potter and cabinetmaker. He was the son of Charles Gallé-Reinemer, a manufacturer of ceramics and glass in Nancy, and as early as 1865 he started working for his father, designing floral decoration. From 1862 to 1866 he studied philosophy, botany and mineralogy in Weimar, and from 1866–7 he was employed by the Burgun, Schwerer & Cie glassworks in Meisenthal. On his return to Nancy he worked in his father’s workshops at Saint-Clément designing faience tableware. In 1871 he travelled to London to represent the family firm at the International Exhibition. During his stay he visited the decorative arts collections at the South Kensington Museum (later the Victoria and Albert Museum), familiarizing himself with Chinese, Japanese and Islamic styles. He was particularly impressed with the Islamic enamelled ware, which influenced his early work. In 1874, after his father’s retirement, he established his own small glass workshop in Nancy and assumed the management of the family business....

Article

American, 19th–20th century, male.

Born 18 February 1848, in New York; died 17 January 1933, in New York.

Painter (gouache), watercolourist, mosaicist, ceramicist, glassmaker. Genre scenes, local scenes, landscapes. Designs for stained glass.

Orientalism, Art Nouveau.

Louis Comfort Tiffany studied under George Inness and Samuel Colman in New York, and under Léon Bailly in Paris during a journey in Europe. He was made an associate of the National Academy of Design in 1871 and an academician in 1880....

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 24 November 1864, in Albi; died 9 September 1901, in Château de Malromé (Gironde).

Painter, ceramicist, printmaker (lithography), draughtsman, caricaturist, illustrator, decorative designer. Genre scenes, portraits, figures, nudes, animals. Designs for stained glass.

Japonisme, Art Nouveau.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec was the son of Count Alphonse de Toulouse-Lautrec Monfa and Countess Toulouse-Lautrec Monfa, née Adèle Tapié de Céleyran. Toulouse-Lautrec’s father had a typically aristocratic love of art and sport, above all hunting (he reared falcons on his estates and even brought them with him to Paris). The young Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec was in all probability destined to follow in his father’s footsteps until, within a period of one year, between 1878 and 1879, he broke first one thighbone, then the other. Despite both the medical care he received and extended convalescence, his legs atrophied (probably the result of calcium deficiency) and he was left unable to walk properly, let alone indulge in sports. As an antidote to long periods of inactivity and boredom, he began to draw and paint, as his father, uncles, and grandfather had done before him – albeit out of choice, rather than necessity....