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Article

Australian, 20th century, male.

Born 1940.

Painter, sculptor, illustrator.

Peter Booth passed from Abstract-Minimal painting to a violent Expressionism in 1977, at which time he realised his first Figurative painting. His works frequently depict human misfortunes and torments, in chaotic compositions tinged with religious sentiments....

Article

New Zealander, 19th century, male.

Died 1907, in Lakewood.

Illustrator.

Article

Bridget Whitelaw

(b St Petersburg, May 9, 1828; d London, March 15, 1902).

Swiss painter and illustrator of Russian birth, active in Australia. He spent his childhood in Russia and in 1845 returned to his father’s home town, Lausanne, where he studied painting at the Musée Arlaud under J. G. Guignard (1811–97). In 1851 he moved to London where he studied lithography under Ludwig Gruner, and in 1853–4 he studied watercolour painting in Rome. He arrived in Australia on 25 December 1854 and, after visiting the goldfields, started working as an illustrator for local newspapers. His work was politically perceptive rather than skilled in its draughtsmanship. Between 1858 and 1864 he accompanied scientific expeditions into the wilderness. Some of the studies made on these trips served as preparatory sketches for his grandiose landscape The Buffalo Ranges (exh. 1864; Melbourne, N.G. Victoria), the first Australian painting purchased for the National Gallery of Victoria.

In November 1865 Chevalier visited New Zealand and explored the South Island for eight months, completing several hundred sketches and watercolours that reveal his brilliance in this field. Chevalier was a founder-member of the Victorian Society for the Fine Arts in Melbourne, where his house provided a centre for the city’s artistic and literary élite. However, he left for London in ...

Article

Australian, 19th century, male.

Born 1839, in Devonshire; died 1901.

Painter, illustrator. Scenes with figures, animals, landscapes.

James Waltham Curtis worked as an illustrator on the Graphic and Sketcher before settling in Melbourne in the 1850s. He worked as a photo retoucher at Johnstone, O'Shannessy and Co. and contributed illustrations to the ...

Article

(b Birmingham, March 15, 1863; d Waverley, Oct 1, 1930).

Australian painter, etcher and illustrator, also active in England. In his formative years he undertook illustrative commissions for the Picturesque Atlas of Australasia, as well as for the Australian Town and Country Journal and other publications. For a time he painted with his friends Tom Roberts, Arthur Streeton and Charles Conder at their camps around Mosman, or on trips to Richmond and along the Hawkesbury River. In his best paintings of this period he achieved a lyricism and sure handling of paint that resembles the work of Conder. During this period he also became interested in etching. In 1900 he moved to New York and the following year he travelled to London, where he continued to work as a black-and-white artist with the London Graphic and Black and White. He painted landscapes depicting picturesque sights and developed an interest in monotypes, using the delicacy of this medium to create soft, low-key images of atmospheric subjects. He worked in the tradition of English landscape painters, such as John Constable and John Sell Cotman, producing calm, quiet, understated images....

Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1876, in Orange (New South Wales), in 1877 or 1878 according to other sources; died 1910, in Sydney.

Painter, watercolourist, illustrator, cartoonist. Figures, animals.

Henry Garlick studied under Arthur Collingridge at Orange Technical College in 1894. The following year he moved to Sydney where he worked as a solicitor's clerk and an illustrator while taking evening classes under Julian Ashton. His cartoons of animals were published in such journals as the ...

Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 17 October 1874, in Creswick (Victoria); died 21 May 1961, in Hornsby, Sydney.

Engraver, illustrator.

Lionel Lindsay was the brother of Norman Lindsay. As a child, he would copy illustrations from magazines such as Punch and became a great admirer of the work of Charles Keene. At the age of 16 he began working as an illustrator for the ...

Article

Australian, 19th century, male.

Born 4 December 1862, in Melbourne; died 28 June 1916, in London.

Painter, illustrator, cartoonist. Landscapes, animals.

Frank Mahony worked in an architect's studio while studying under Anivitti at the New South Wales Academy of Art. He exhibited paintings in the ...

Article

(b Hamstead, nr Birmingham, July 12, 1812; d Melbourne, Oct 21, 1895).

English illustrator, draughtsman, writer and painter, active in Australia. She was educated at home and was taught by Thomas Lawrence to paint portrait miniatures on ivory. In 1832, at the age of 20, she earned the respect of Henry Parkes (later Premier of New South Wales, Australia) for her writings in support of the Chartist movement, begun in Birmingham in that year. In 1835 she published her first book, Poems: With Original Illustrations Drawn and Etched by the Authoress (London, 1835), and the following year wrote and illustrated The Romance of Nature or The Flower Seasons, containing 26 coloured plates engraved after her original drawings. She married her cousin Charles in 1839 and moved to Sydney, Australia, and then to Tasmania. Having attributed her botanical knowledge to a study of the works of the draughtsman and engraver James Sowerby (1757–1822), she described and illustrated the plant and animal life of Tasmania and painted landscapes and miniatures. Some of her writings are in the form of picturesque travel books accompanied by her illustrations, for example ...

Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in the USA.

Born 1869, in Maldon; died 1959.

Illustrator, engraver.

Frank Arthur Nankivell studied in Japan and San Francisco. He settled in New York in 1896 and may have worked for a humorous magazine entitled Puck. He also made etchings....

Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1868, in Sydney; died September 1933, in London.

Painter, illustrator. Portraits.

Percy Spence spent his early life in Fiji, and exhibited with the Art Society of New South Wales in Sydney. He travelled to London in 1895, where he lived until ...

Article

Heather Curnow

(b Teignmouth, Devon, July 3, 1825; d Wadhurst, E. Sussex, Jan 3, 1915).

English painter and illustrator. He was the grandson of the antiquarian Joseph Strutt (1749–1802) and the son of the miniaturist William Thomas Strutt (1777–1850). He trained in Paris from 1838 to 1845 in the studios of Michel-Martin Drolling and Joseph-Nicholas Jouy (b 1809), and at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. In 1850 he went to Melbourne, where he contributed to the Illustrated Australian Magazine, visited the Ballarat gold fields and recorded the meeting of Victoria’s first Legislative Council. He received numerous commissions for portraits of important Melbourne public figures including politicians and the explorer Robert O’Hara Burke. In 1855–6 he lived in New Zealand and produced accomplished paintings, drawings and watercolours of his pioneering life in the bush, the Maoris and the scenery around New Plymouth (e.g. The Beach, New Plymouth, c. 1856; Wellington, NZ, Turnbull Lib.). Returning to Melbourne in 1856, Strutt became a founder-member of the Victorian Society of Fine Arts and sketched the departure of the Burke and Wills exploring expedition from Melbourne in ...

Article

Miles Lewis

(b Sudbury, Suffolk, Nov 26, 1821; d Melbourne, Aug 9, 1898).

Australian architect of English birth. He worked in London for the English architect and illustrator Thomas Allom (1804–72). In 1849 he emigrated to Melbourne and entered a partnership as architect and surveyor with his brother James, who was already established in business as a local builder. Their first prominent commission was St Paul’s church in the centre of Melbourne (1850), subsequently replaced by Butterfield’s Cathedral. The partnership ended in 1854, when James went to England, and Webb practised for four years in partnership with Thomas Taylor. His design for St Andrew’s church, Brighton, Melbourne (1856–7), shows unmistakable characteristics of buildings that he had sketched before leaving England. Melbourne Grammar School (1856) is the most important building of this phase, designed in the dark local bluestone, but Tudor in character. Webb’s work is difficult to characterize. It includes two important terrace rows of houses, Burlington Terrace (...

Article

Shearer West

English family of painters and illustrators . Richard Westall (b Hertford, 1765; d London, 4 Dec 1836) was apprenticed in 1799 to John Thompson, a heraldic engraver in London. The miniaturist John Alefounder (d 1795) advised Westall to take up painting, and in 1784 he exhibited a portrait drawing (untraced) at the Royal Academy. He became a student at the Royal Academy Schools in 1785, an ARA in 1792 and an RA in 1794. He exhibited over 300 works at the Royal Academy and 70 at the British Institution, including such large watercolours as Cassandra Prophesying the Fall of Troy (exh. London, RA 1796; London, V&A), which are painted in violent and sometimes excessive colours. Others, such as The Rosebud (1791; New Haven, CT, Yale Cent. Brit. A.), tend towards a Rococo prettiness. His principal expertise was book illustration. He was employed by John Boydell, Thomas Macklin and ...