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Article

Swiss, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1766, in Geneva; died 1820, in St Petersburg.

Enameller, miniaturist. Figures.

He worked in Geneva, subsequently in Russia. A miniature by him (a portrait of a man) was sold by René Ch. in 1919 for 520 francs.

Geneva: Adrienne Lecouvreur...

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 30 April 1764, in Milan; died 11 February 1849, in Florence.

Painter, draughtsman (including ink), watercolourist, engraver (line-engraving). Allegorical subjects, historical subjects, battles, genre scenes, scenes with figures. Decorative schemes, church decoration, decorative designs.

After studying in Milan and Rome, Ademollo was invited to Florence to decorate the Teatro della Pergola (which has since been destroyed). He settled in Florence until his death and was widely regarded as one of the neo-classical masters of the Tuscan School. At the start of his career, he painted principally arabesques, but went on to develop his technique to the point where Ferdinand III commissioned him to decorate the Pitti Palace and to paint historical and allegorical subjects for its individual rooms. One of his best-known works is ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 16 July 1756, in Lautrec (Tarn); died most probably, in Bordeaux.

Painter, decorative designer. Theatre decoration.

Pierre-Joseph Alaux studied painting and decoration with his father, Joseph, a painter, decorator and master weaver born at the beginning of the 18th century. Pierre-Joseph had several children, including three painter sons: Jean-Pierre the Elder, who created the 'neorama', Jean, nicknamed Romain, and Jean-Paul, known as Gentil. He worked principally in Bordeaux, a town then expanding rapidly, and where in ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b 1756; d 1833).

American chair-maker, active in Philadelphia, specializing in Windsor chairs, which were painted or gilded. His relatives (possibly sons) John and Peter Allwine were apprenticed to him. The first family workshop opened on South Front Street in 1791, and the last, on Sassafras Street (now Race Street), closed in 1809, when Lawrence and John migrated to Zanesville, in Muskingum County, OH, they continued to make chairs, and also ran a tavern. Lawrence Allwine is the eponym of the varnish known as ‘Allwine Gloss’....

Article

Dutch, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1746, in Amsterdam; died 1813, in Amsterdam.

Painter, draughtsman, decorative artist, watercolourist. Genre scenes, figures, landscapes with figures, landscapes, still-lifes. Designs for tapestries.

Anthony Andriessen often worked in collaboration with Jurriaan Andriessen, his brother and teacher. In 1766 he was a member of the drawing academy. Johannes van Troostwijk was his pupil....

Article

Dutch, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 12 June 1742, in Amsterdam; died 31 July 1819.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman. Allegorical subjects, genre scenes, portraits, landscapes with figures, landscapes. Designs for tapestries, theatre decoration.

Jurriaan Andriessen was a pupil of Anthony Elliger; in 1760 he studied at the Amsterdam academy of drawing. He had many pupils, including Jean Grandjean, Daniel Dupré, Wouter Johannès van Troostwijk, Hendrik Voogt, his brother Anthony Andriessen, his son Christiaan and his granddaughter Cornelia Aletta van Hulst....

Article

Maria Helena Mendes Pinto

(fl c. 1766; d Lisbon, 1814).

Portuguese wood-carver and cabinetmaker. From 1766 he worked uninterruptedly on commissions from the royal family or under their patronage, even after the court had gone into exile in Brazil in 1807. His name is recorded from 1803 in the book of those receiving communion in Rua S Roque in the Encarnação parish where he, like many other wood-carvers, lived or had his workshop. He was licensed as a wood-carver of the Casa do Infantado and later of the royal palaces (1805). When he applied for the latter qualification, he made a list (possibly chronological) of his works prefaced by the statement: ‘As I show here, I have been serving the royal household for thirty-three years’. This key document in Ângelo’s own hand allows a fuller survey of his work than has previously been feasible (Correira Guedes, 1971). Ângelo worked principally in executing the designs of architects of the royal household or the Casa do Infantado, sometimes on his own with complete freedom and responsibility, as in the construction of the tower for fireworks on the occasion of the inauguration (...

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 7 July 1754, in Parma; died 18 March 1830.

Painter, decorative designer.

Studied at the academy in Parma and under E. Petitot. He was awarded several prizes between 1778 and 1780. Appointed professor at the academy in 1821 in succession to Donnino Ferrari....

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1759, in St-Dié (Vosges); died 13 April 1832, in Paris.

Painter, miniaturist, enameller. Portraits.

Augustin was a self-trained artist. He often claimed to have never had a teacher, and no biographer has been able to find evidence of one. Nothing is known of his life before 1781, when he arrived in Paris with only three twenty-franc pieces, no friends or sponsors, and without yet having demonstrated or shown any hint of his talent. Given his position, his first attempts to establish himself were inevitably fraught with difficulty. However, his perseverance overcame these obstacles and he soon became successful. From 1791 to 1831, he exhibited regularly at the Paris Salon, and swiftly became a fashionable artist. From 1796, some artists began appending 'élève d'Augustin' (student of Augustin) to their signature. He trained many students, including Besselière, Madame de Mirbel, the Chevalier de Lestang-Parade, the Vicomte Desfossez, Fontallard, Ménageot, Pinchot, Sieurac, Mademoiselle Delacazette, and his wife, who was awarded a medal at the Salon of 1824. He himself was knighted a Chevalier of the Légion d'Honneur in 1821, and in 1824 received the official title of first miniature painter to the King's household....

Article

Oscar P. Fitzgerald

(b Milton, MA, 1751; d Dorchester Lower Mills, MA, Aug 25, 1815).

American cabinetmaker . His father, also Stephen Badlam (1721–58), was a part-time cabinetmaker and tavern keeper. Orphaned at a young age, Badlam was trained both as a surveyor and as a cabinetmaker. Soon after the outbreak of the American Revolution he was commissioned as a major in the artillery. He resigned within a year because of illness but after the war was made a general in the Massachusetts militia. On his return to Dorchester Lower Mills, he opened a cabinetmaking shop in his house and became active in civic affairs. He built up a substantial business, which included participation in the thriving coast trade, and even sold furniture through the warehouse of Thomas Seymour in Boston. He also provided turning for other cabinetmakers in the neighbourhood and sold picture-frame materials and window glass. Several chairs in the Federal style with characteristic carved and stopped fluted legs are stamped with his mark, but his fame rests on the monumental mahogany chest-on-chest (...

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1744, in Pistoia (Tuscany); died 22 October 1816, in Bologna.

Painter, engraver, sculptor, decorative designer.

Baldi studied drawing and painting initially under Francesco Beneforti in Pistoia, then travelled to Bologna, where he entered the workshop of the painter Mauro Tezi, with whom he subsequently collaborated as an assistant. He enjoyed the patronage of Count Massimiliano Gini. He excelled expecially at painting flowers. According to Zani, Valentino Baldi was also an engraver and sculptor....

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active also active in Russia.

Died 1810, in Bologna.

Painter, decorative artist. Church decoration, theatre decoration, wall decorations.

Bolognese School.

Studied under his brother Giuseppe Gioachino and accompanied him on a voyage to Russia before returning to work in Bologna. His decorative work is to be found in the Bologna church of S Maria della Vita, in the church of SS Cosimo e Damiano, at the church of S Catarina, in the theatre in Ferrara, and in the Palazzo Bovi Silvestri. He also decorated the church of S Vitale in Ravenna....

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in London.

Died after 1836.

Miniaturist, enameller.

J. Barrow exhibited for the first time in London in 1797 and, for 39 years, produced many enamel paintings of women and men. He features 21 times in the Royal Academy's catalogue; he also exhibited at the Society of British Artists on Suffolk Street. Could possibly be the same as John Barrow....

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b 1760; d 1838).

Irish–American cabinetmaker. He was a native of Dublin who trained in London before emigrating in late 1794 to Philadelphia, which was then the capital of America. In 1812 he entered into partnership with his son and advertised his ‘fashionable Cabinet Furniture, superbly finished in the rich Egyptian and Gothic style’. Surviving examples of his furniture are in Neo-classical style, such as the sideboard in the Utah Museum of Fine Arts in Salt Lake City....

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Cologne from 1786 to 1800.

Painter, engraver.

Peter Beckenkamp was decorator to the court of Cologne and was the brother of Kaspar Benedikt Beckenkamp.

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1744; died 1818.

Watercolourist, draughtsman, decorative designer, designer of ornamental architectural features. Architectural interiors, architectural views.

London, 25 June 1981: Interior Section of the Temple of the Sun, the Temple of Saturn and the Temple of Priapus (pen and wash...

Article

Gordon Campbell

French family of furniture-makers. Pierre-Antoine Bellangé (1758–1827) made furniture for the courts of Napoleon (reg 1804–14), Louis XVIII (reg 1814–24) and Charles X (reg 1824–30). His furniture is characteristically made from mahogany and other dark woods. As part of the reconstruction of the White House in 1817, President James Munroe ordered 53 pieces of furniture from Bellangé: a pier table, two sofas, two bergères, two screens, four upholstered stools, six footstools, 18 armchairs and 18 side chairs. Many of these pieces were dispersed in the auction of 1860. The process of reassembling this collection in the White House was initiated in 1961 by Jacqueline Kennedy (1929–94); the White House now has the pier table, a bergère, a sofa and four armchairs.

Pierre Antoine’s brother, Louis François Bellangé (1759–1827) was also a furniture-maker; furniture that he designed himself is usually decorated with porcelain plaques, but his workshop also used designs by Edmé-Charles Boulle. When the brothers died in ...

Article

Swiss, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1732, in Les Ponts de Martel (Neuchâtel); died 1825, in Les Ponts de Martel.

Enameller.

He had two sons who were also artists: Louis the Younger, who died in 1830, and Henri.

Article

Flemish School, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Louvain (Brabant).

Died 1819.

Painter, decorative designer. Architectural views. Ornaments.

Berges' work included views of convents and monasteries in Louvain, but these have been lost since 1789.

Article

Swedish, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 15 January 1757, in Ramshäll; died 11 April 1844, in Stockholm.

Engraver (aquatint), miniaturist, enameller. Portraits.

Anton Berndes is thought to have been trained by Gustaf Lundberg and Hojer. He was in great demand as a portraitist, and was very successful in Sweden as an engraver of aquatints, a skill he learned in England in ...