1-10 of 10 results  for:

  • Nineteenth-Century Art x
  • Eighteenth-Century Art x
  • Industrial and Commercial Art x
Clear all

Article

Giles Waterfield

(b London, 1756; d London, Jan 7, 1811).

English painter and art collector of Swiss descent. Born to a family of Swiss watchmakers in London, Bourgeois was apprenticed as a boy to P. J. de Loutherbourg. The latter heavily influenced his art, which was to elevate him to membership of the Royal Academy in 1793. Bourgeois specialized in landscape and genre scenes and achieved recognition in his own day with works such as Tiger Hunt and William Tell (both c. 1790; London, Dulwich Pict. Gal.), but his works are no longer regarded as of any note.

Bourgeois was linked from an early age with Noël Desenfans, who in effect adopted him when his father left London for Switzerland. Desenfans promoted Bourgeois’s reputation as an artist and involved him in his own activities as a picture dealer. Bourgeois became passionately interested in buying paintings, and in the last 15 years of his life bought considerable numbers, sometimes creating financial problems for the partnership. His taste was characteristic of the traditional Grand Manner of his time, concentrating on the great names of the 16th and 17th centuries, particularly academic works and paintings of the Netherlandish schools....

Article

Swiss, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1760, in Kerns; died 1816.

Sculptor (wood).

Franz Joseph Bucher is best known for his sculpted furniture.

Article

Barbara Mazza

(b Venice, May 14, 1783; d Venice, May 8, 1852).

Italian architect, engineer and landscape designer. He was a prominent Neo-classical architect but was also a noted eclectic, much admired, for example, by Pietro Selvatico, and he introduced the taste for the romantic garden to Italy. He attended courses in architecture and figure drawing at the Accademia Clementina, Bologna (1789–9). This school, which was in the forefront of theatre design and technique, provided a stimulating and enlightened cultural environment; his teachers included Angelo Venturoli (1749–1821) and Francesco Tadolini (1723–1805). After obtaining his diploma in 1800, he moved to Padua, and in 1803 he entered the studio of Giovanni Valle, a mapmaker, where he became a qualified surveyor. He collaborated with the engineer Paolo Artico between 1804 and 1806 on defence works on the River Piave, and in 1807, with the architect Daniele Danieletti (1756–1822), he restored the old prison in Carrara Castle. The same year he was also appointed as an engineer in the Regio Corpo di Acque e Strade in the Brenta region. His works of this period included decorating the town hall (...

Article

Rosamond Allwood

(fl c. 1790–c. 1839).

English furniture designer. In the mid-1830s he described himself as ‘an upholsterer of fourty five years experience’. He produced a series of pattern books containing designs for furniture and upholstery that was widely used by commercial cabinetmakers. The Modern Style of Cabinet Work Exemplified (1829) was reprinted in an improved version in 1835 and was still in demand in the trade as late as 1862, when it was reissued unaltered. King claimed that ‘as far as possible the English style is carefully blended with Parisian taste’ in the 227 designs, but he also included Grecian and Gothic furniture. King’s interpretation of the prevailing French taste is a typically confused mixture of bold Baroque scrolls and lighter Rococo curves. His Designs for Carving and Gilding (1830) contains both Greek and Rococo Revival designs, as does Modern Designs for Household Furniture (n.d.). In 1833 King published a book of full-size designs for makers of cabinets, chairs and sofas, turners and carvers entitled ...

Article

James Yorke

(fl London, 1760–c. 1770).

English furniture designer and cabinetmaker. He was recorded as working in the Haymarket, London, from 1760 until 1766, but no furniture documented or labelled from his workshop has been identified. In 1760 he contributed 50 designs to Houshold Furniture in Genteel Taste, sponsored by a Society of Upholsterers and Cabinetmakers, and in the same year he published the Carpenter’s Compleat Guide to the Whole System of Gothic Railing, which consisted of 14 plates. There followed the Cabinet and Chair-maker’s Real Friend and Companion in 1765, with designs for 100 chairs in Gothic, chinoiserie, Rococo and Rustic styles. A second edition, virtually unaltered, appeared in 1775. In 1766 he brought out the Chair-maker’s Guide, containing ‘upwards of Two Hundered New and Genteel Designs … for Gothic, Chinese, Ribbon and other chairs’; it includes two plates from William Ince and John Mayhew’s Universal System of Household Furniture and at least six from ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b 1748; d 1810).

Franco-Swedish furniture designer and decorative painter. From 1784 he was decorator to King Gustav III (reg 1771–92) and the Swedish nobility and introduced his sophisticated brand of Neo-classicism, which has become associated with the Gustavian style. Masreliez, sometimes in collaboration with his brother Jean-Baptiste (1753–1801), designed furniture and interiors that marry, in a style analogous to the work of Robert Adam, decorated panelling, carpets, built-in and free-standing furniture, and inset frames, which are intended to bind certain set-piece paintings to the rooms containing them. Examples can be seen in Gustav's bedroom at Haga, where Masreliez was commissioned to incorporate the painting of Sully at the Feet of Henry IV (in situ) by Alexander Roslin (1718–93) into the decoration; and in Prince Karl's Audience Chamber (1792) in the Royal Palace, Stockholm. In the latter, the whole room is a ‘frame’ for a series of pictures showing Swedish historical battles. The Roslin frame is in a chaste, fluted Neo-classical style subservient to the drama of the painting; but it is also ‘framed’ by the wall panels of gold on white, which use strong vertebrate scrolling ornaments between multiple bands of husks and beading. The latter are echoed by the carved husks and beading of the Neo-classical chairs and canape....

Article

James Yorke

(b ?Stockton-upon-Tees, Co. Durham; bur London, Oct 27, 1806).

English furniture designer. In his obituary he was described as ‘a native of Stockton-upon-Tees, and for many years a journeyman cabinetmaker, but who since about the year 1793, has supported himself, a wife and two children, by his exertions as an author’. In his first pattern-book of 1791–3 he described himself as a cabinetmaker, but a trade card of about 1796 (London, BM) indicates that he was a professional furniture designer and drawing-master rather than the owner of a workshop. He is first recorded as being in London in 1791 but he returned to Co. Durham c. 1800–02, where he was ordained as a Baptist minister. His remaining four years were spent in London, and he was buried at St James’s, Piccadilly. In 1804 he was described by Adam Black, a publisher, as ‘a Man of Talents, and, I believe, of genuine piety. He understands the cabinet business—I believe was bred to it, he has been, and perhaps at present is, a preacher; he is a scholar, writes well; draws, in my opinion masterly; is an author, bookseller, stationer and teacher’....

Article

Rosamond Allwood

(fl c. London, 1786–1828).

English furniture designer. He published in three parts his influential A Collection of Designs for Household Furniture and Interior Decoration, with 158 plates dating from 1804 to 1807, issued in one volume in 1808. It was available plain or for a guinea extra ‘elegantly coloured’ and was the most comprehensive pattern book of Regency furniture designs. Most of the designs are based on ancient Greek or Roman forms and display the influence of Thomas Hope, whose house in Duchess Street, London, was open to the public from 1804. Smith also included a few Egyptian, Gothic and Chinese designs. On the title-page of the book Smith is described as ‘Upholder Extraordinary to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales’, but little is known of his cabinetmaking activities, and no furniture by him has been identified. Smith contributed furniture designs to Rudolf Ackermann’s Repository of Arts, and in 1812 he published A Collection of Ornamental Designs after the Manner of the Antique...

Article

Nancy Halverson Schless

(b Philadelphia, PA, 1788; d Nashville, TN, April 6, 1854).

American architect, engineer and painter. Among the first generation of native-born architects, he was an influential designer in the Greek Revival style. Over a period of almost 50 years he executed more than 70 commissions, many of them in Philadelphia. His last major building was the Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville, built from 1845.

Through his father, a master carpenter who had worked on Latrobe’s Bank of Pennsylvania, Strickland was apprenticed to Benjamin Henry Latrobe in 1803, remaining in his office for about four years. During his apprenticeship he studied Latrobe’s folios of Greek antiquities, including James Stuart’s and Nicholas Revett’s Antiquities of Athens, 4 vols (1762–1816), as well as publications by the Society of Dilettanti. By 1807 he was in New York with his father, working as a painter of stage scenery. The following year he returned to Philadelphia, where he received his first major commission: a design for the city’s Masonic Hall (...

Article

Swedish, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 9 September 1759, in Rättvik; died 29 September 1833, in Hedesunda.

Painter, designer. Genre scenes, rustic scenes. Murals, furniture.

Hans Wikström was the most famous painter of farm scenes in the Gästrikland region. The museum in Stockholm contains several decorations by him for furniture and frescoes intended for farms....