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Article

German, 19th century, male.

Born 1787, in Mainz; died 1843, in Frankfurt.

Painter. Landscapes.

Brother and pupil of Johann Ackermann, he quickly established a reputation as a landscape artist and set himself up near his brother in Frankfurt.

Article

British, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 12 October 1854, in Edinburgh; died 1929, in North Berwick.

Painter (including gouache). Interiors with figures, landscapes, urban landscapes, gardens, urban views, architectural views, interiors, portraits.

Having studied at the Royal Scottish Academy under George Paul Chalmers and MacTaggart, Patrick Adam went on to exhibit at the Royal Scottish Academy at the age of 18 and at the London Royal Academy ...

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Painter. Landscapes with figures, landscapes.

Douglas Adams, a landscape artist, exhibited from 1880 at the Royal Academy, the Suffolk Street Gallery and the New Gallery.

London, 23 April 1910: George from Sannox on the Isle of Aran, GBP 42

London, 8 May 1981...

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Active in Liverpoolc.1870.

Landscape artist.

Article

Denis A. Lambin

(b Grenoble, Oct 26, 1817; d Paris, Dec 6, 1891).

French landscape architect and civil engineer. A graduate of the Ecole Polytechnique (1835) and Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées (1838), Paris, he was sent to Bordeaux to reorganize the harbour’s access and the forest of the Landes. In 1851 Georges Eugène Haussmann, the newly appointed Préfet de la Gironde, asked Alphand to prepare the festivities in honour of the official visit of the French President, Prince Louis Napoleon. After the Prince became emperor, as Napoleon III, in 1852, he ordered Haussmann to transform Paris into a modern metropolis. In 1854 Haussmann summoned Alphand to redesign the Bois de Boulogne. Alphand arrived from Bordeaux with the horticulturist and landscape architect Jean-Pierre Barillet-Deschamps (1824–75), and together they carried out a vast number of projects, cutting straight avenues through historic, often picturesque, districts. Alphand also designed airy public gardens and parks, in accord with Haussmann’s overall scheme. He laid out the Bois de Vincennes (...

Article

[Anhalt, Duke of]

(b Dessau, Aug 10, 1740; reg 1756–1817; d Dessau, Aug 9, 1817).

German ruler and garden designer. After leaving the Prussian Army in 1757, he devoted himself to governing Dessau, instituting provision for the poor, public health and education. He made four journeys to England (1763–85) with Friedrich Wilhelm Erdmannsdorff, with whom he also travelled through Italy (1765–6). He studied for six months with Johann Joachim Winckelmann, whose ‘mimetic theory of the Ancients’ he realized in his garden designs. With Erdmannsdorff and his planters, he created gardens at Luisium (1774) and Sieglitzer Berg (1777) and most notably at Wörlitz (1764–1810), based on such English models as The Leasowes (Worcs), Stowe (Bucks), Kew Gardens (London) and Stourhead (Wilts). He was acquainted with William Chambers, Henry Holland, Sir William Hamilton (i) and possibly also Henry Flitcroft and ‘Capability’ Brown. As well as introducing the English landscape garden and Palladian country house to the Continent, the Prince also transplanted the Gothic Revival. The ‘Country House’ and ‘Gothic House’ at ...

Article

Andreas Kreul

(b Hamburg, Oct 2, 1757; d Pisa, Aug 18, 1806).

German architect, draughtsman, landscape designer and painter. He studied from 1778 to 1783 at the University of Göttingen and the Royal Danish Academy in Copenhagen, where he was awarded four prizes. His early designs included drawings for the hothouse of the botanic gardens in Copenhagen and a lecture room at Schloss Charlottenburg, Berlin. While visiting Paris in 1784–5 he devoted himself to the study of Revolutionary architecture, and in England and Italy (1786) he studied landscape design and ancient sites. In Rome in 1787 he met Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, who later summoned him to Weimar to rebuild the prince’s Schloss. In addition to a number of designs for the palace at Weimar he produced drawings for various summer-houses. In 1790 he moved to Hamburg, his plans for the Schloss at Weimar still largely unexecuted. By the end of his life he had designed numerous public buildings and private houses in Hamburg, including the house for Bürgermeister ...

Article

Latvian, 20th century, male.

Born 15 January 1908, in Riga; died 13 January 1997.

Painter.

Until 1933, Ansis Artums was a pupil of the Post-Impressionist landscape artist Vilhelms Pruvitis at the academy of art in Riga. He lived in Tukums and participated in many collective exhibitions including the ...

Article

Swiss, 19th century, male.

Born 1778, in Geneva; died 25 May 1834, at Choully, near Geneva.

Painter, draughtsman. Historical subjects, landscapes, landscapes with figures.

Having studied in Geneva with Pierre-Louis Larive-Godefroy, a landscape artist after Claude Lorraine, he went to Paris and joined Jacques-Louis David's studio. Later, he worked under the guidance of Anne-Louis Girodet....

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Active 1850-1860s.

Landscape artist.

Henry Backhouse exhibited in London in 1856.

Harrogate (Mercer AG): Alpine Valley with Bridge (1867, watercolour)

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Landscape artist.

J. Backhouse exhibited in London in 1855.

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Active in Winchester.

Landscape artist.

Baigent exhibited in London from 1843 to 1846.

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Painter. Landscapes.

A landscape artist, Baildon exhibited a View of Edgecroft in 1824, followed in 1841 by another landscape at the Royal Academy in London.

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Active in Londonc.1884.

Landscape artist.

Arthur Bailey exhibited at the Suffolk Street Gallery in 1884 and 1885.

Article

James D. Kornwolf

(b Ramsgate, Oct 23, 1865; d Brighton, Feb 10, 1945).

English architect, interior designer, garden designer and writer . He was articled to Charles Davis (1827–1902), City Architect of Bath, from 1886 until 1889 but learnt little and was largely self-taught. In 1889 he started his own practice on the Isle of Man, where he built a number of buildings, including his own Red House, Douglas (1893). He was a leading member of the second-generation Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain and was among the first to build on the simpler, more abstract and stylized designs of C. F. A. Voysey, a refinement of the ideas of William Morris, Philip Webb, R. Norman Shaw and others from the period 1860–90. From about 1890 until World War I, the Arts and Crafts Movement, as represented by Baillie Scott, Voysey, C. R. Ashbee, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Parker & Unwin and others, became the most important international force in architecture, interior design, landscape and urban planning. The work of these architects influenced Adolf Loos and Josef Hoffmann in Austria, Joseph Maria Olbrich and Peter Behrens in Germany, Eliel Saarinen and others in Scandinavia, and Frank Lloyd Wright, Irving Gill, Greene & Greene in the USA....

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Landscape artist.

R.M. Baily exhibited in London in 1874.

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Active in Woolwich.

Landscape artist.

J. Baker exhibited at the Suffolk Street Gallery from 1840 to 1851.

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Active in Kilburn, London, in the second half of the 19th century.

Landscape artist.

A.P. Barclay exhibited in London in 1873 and 1880.

Article

British, 19th century, female.

Active in Wimbledon.

Landscape artist.

Bardswell exhibited in London in 1880 and 1881.

Article

British, 19th century, female.

Active in Old Charltonc.1870.

Landscape artist.

Emily Barlow exhibited in London from 1870 to 1876.