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Article

British, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 12 October 1854, in Edinburgh; died 1929, in North Berwick.

Painter (including gouache). Interiors with figures, landscapes, urban landscapes, gardens, urban views, architectural views, interiors, portraits.

Having studied at the Royal Scottish Academy under George Paul Chalmers and MacTaggart, Patrick Adam went on to exhibit at the Royal Scottish Academy at the age of 18 and at the London Royal Academy ...

Article

Latvian, 20th century, male.

Born 15 January 1908, in Riga; died 13 January 1997.

Painter.

Until 1933, Ansis Artums was a pupil of the Post-Impressionist landscape artist Vilhelms Pruvitis at the academy of art in Riga. He lived in Tukums and participated in many collective exhibitions including the ...

Article

James D. Kornwolf

(b Ramsgate, Oct 23, 1865; d Brighton, Feb 10, 1945).

English architect, interior designer, garden designer and writer . He was articled to Charles Davis (1827–1902), City Architect of Bath, from 1886 until 1889 but learnt little and was largely self-taught. In 1889 he started his own practice on the Isle of Man, where he built a number of buildings, including his own Red House, Douglas (1893). He was a leading member of the second-generation Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain and was among the first to build on the simpler, more abstract and stylized designs of C. F. A. Voysey, a refinement of the ideas of William Morris, Philip Webb, R. Norman Shaw and others from the period 1860–90. From about 1890 until World War I, the Arts and Crafts Movement, as represented by Baillie Scott, Voysey, C. R. Ashbee, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Parker & Unwin and others, became the most important international force in architecture, interior design, landscape and urban planning. The work of these architects influenced Adolf Loos and Josef Hoffmann in Austria, Joseph Maria Olbrich and Peter Behrens in Germany, Eliel Saarinen and others in Scandinavia, and Frank Lloyd Wright, Irving Gill, Greene & Greene in the USA....

Article

Nadine Pouillon

(b Château-Renault, Indre-et-Loire, April 24, 1873; d Montoire-sur-le-Loir, nr Vendôme, Aug 12, 1958).

French painter. Like many naive artists, he discovered his vocation for drawing and painting late in life. His work as a gardener in Touraine awakened his love of nature, and he educated himself by reading history and mythology and by travelling in central and western France. He was mobilized in World War I and was sent to Greece to take part in the Dardanelles campaign; on his return to France his drawing skills were recognized by the Army and he was put in charge of charting and rangefinding. It was this experience that encouraged him to become a painter in 1919.

Bauchant exhibited his work for the first time at the Salon d’Automne in 1921. His flower pictures were soon succeeded by subjects from history, such as Louis XI Having Mulberry Bushes Planted near Tours (1943; Paris, Pompidou), from mythology, as in Cleopatra, on her Way to Anthony (...

Article

Danish, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 28 September 1873, in Nestved.

Painter, draughtsman. Portraits, landscapes.

Aage Bertelsen was the son of Rudolf Bertelsen, the landscape artist and professor. From 1906 to 1908 he formed part of the team that was preparing for the 1908 expedition to Greenland. On his return, his drawings and paintings of the polar regions were exhibited in Copenhagen....

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born in Blois.

Landscape artist.

Arthur Besnard exhibited at the Salon des Artistes Indépendants in 1910.

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1855, in Gruissan (Aude); died 1936, in Avignon.

Painter. Landscapes.

Bill settled in Toulon as a painter and photographer around 1884, then in Avignon where he studied under the landscape artist Paul Sain. From 1888, he regularly contributed works to the Salon des Artistes Français, where he received an honourable mention in ...

Article

Brent Elliott

Garden in Gwynedd, Wales. It was laid out from 1874 by Edward Milner (1819–84) for Henry Davis Pochin, an industrial chemist, with further improvements undertaken in the early 20th century by Pochin’s descendants. Milner’s initial design confined Bodnant’s formal and architectural features—most notably a laburnum archway and beds of flowering shrubs—to the curtilage of the house, while an extensive lawn, artificial rockworks by James Pulham (c. 1820–98) and a conifer collection filled the rest of the grounds. Between 1905 and 1914 Pochin’s grandson, Henry Duncan McLaren, 2nd Baron Aberconway (1879–1953), carved the lawn into a series of five Italianate terraces of individual character (including one with a buttressed wall and formal water-lily pool) and a canal terrace. This last terrace was provided with trelliswork and an open-air stage backed by yew hedges, and it was further supplemented in 1938 by the Pin Mill, a small industrial building of ...

Article

British, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 6 May 1857, in Sibsey (Lincolnshire); died 9 August 1915, in Chalford (Gloucester).

Painter. Figures, portraits, genre scenes, interiors with figures, landscapes with figures, landscapes, urban landscapes, urban views, architectural views, gardens.

Newlyn School.

Bramley studied at Lincoln School of Art from ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in France.

Born 1861, in Columbus (Ohio); died 1936, in Giverny, France.

Painter. Figures, portraits, interiors with figures, landscapes with figures, waterscapes, winter landscapes, harbour views, gardens.

Theodore Butler studied under Monet and lived in Giverny. He married Monet's stepdaughter Suzanne Hoshedé in ...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, female.

Born in Paris.

Painter. Figures, landscapes, winter landscapes, seascapes, gardens, flowers. Decorative panels.

Daughter of the sculptor A. Zoegger, Marie Anne Camax-Zoegger studied under Henner, who painted a portrait of her as The Young Artist. She was a member of the Société Nationale and president of the Syndicat des Femmes Peintres et Sculpteurs. She painted compositions featuring children, flowers and landscapes and also produced decorative panels. ...

Article

Italian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in Pescara.

Born 1860, in Pescara; died 1950.

Painter, lithographer. Scenes with figures, landscapes.

Basilio Cascella was the father of the landscape artist Michele Cascella and of Tommaso Cascella. He painted compositions on fantastical themes, including Lotta e Fine...

Article

Noël Annesley

[Christie, Manson & Woods]

Auction house founded in London by James Christie (1730–1803). After a few years spent in the navy, James Christie worked as an assistant to an auctioneer named Mr Annesley in Covent Garden, London. He left Annesley in 1763 to set up on his own and in 1766 established his firm at the print warehouse of Richard Dalton in Pall Mall, where the Royal Academy held its exhibitions in its early years. In 1770 he moved his premises next door to Schomberg House, Pall Mall, where Thomas Gainsborough lived. The first known catalogue is dated 5 December 1766; it includes little of value except for a picture by Aelbert Cuyp. Christie rapidly established himself as one of the foremost auctioneers, however, cultivating a circle of friends and advisers that included Gainsborough, Reynolds, Horace Walpole, David Garrick, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, and Edmund Burke, and receiving many auction consignments from royalty and the nobility. During the French Revolution the firm did particularly well through the abundance of works then coming into Britain. Among the more notable early Christie sales were that of the former collection of Pope ...

Article

Cornish  

Keith N. Morgan

American town and former artists’ colony in the state of New Hampshire. Situated on a line of hills near the eastern bank of the Connecticut River c. 160 km north-west of Boston, Cornish looks across to Windsor, VT, and Mt Ascutney. It was settled in 1763 as an agrarian community, but its population was rapidly reduced during the migration to the cities in the second half of the 19th century. From 1885 until around the time of World War I, Cornish was the summer home of a group of influential sculptors, painters, architects, gardeners, and writers. For this coherent group, the Cornish hills symbolized an ideal natural environment that reflected the classical images so important in their work. The sculptor who first spent a summer in Cornish in 1885, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, bought his summer residence there in 1891, and he was soon followed by the painters Henry Oliver Walker (...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1861, in Hartford (Kentucky); died 1942.

Painter, pastellist. Figures, nudes, portraits, genre scenes, interiors with figures, landscapes with figures, landscapes, gardens.

Cragsmoor Artists' Colony.

Charles Courtney Curran studied in turn in Cincinnati, at the Fine Arts Academy, at the Art Students League in New York and, in 1888, at the Académie Julian in Paris under Benjamin-Constant, Jules Lefebvre and H. Lucien Doucet. He returned to Paris on a number of occasions, but from 1903 lived mainly at the Cragsmoor artists' colony....

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1872, in Boston (Massachusetts); died 1945.

Painter. Portraits, landscapes, animals.

Robert Franz Curry was primarily a landscape artist. Born at the time of the Impressionist movement, he was part of a generation of artists who showed great sensitivity to the influence of the seasons and the weather on the landscape. In the titles of his paintings he often refers to the time of day, the season and the weather, with terms such as 'at twilight', 'winter's day' and 'snowy'....

Article

Belgian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 29 December 1865, in Gerpinnes; died 1940.

Painter. Landscapes, flowers, still-lifes.

Henri Deglume studied in Antwerp with Théodore Baron. He was mainly a landscape artist and his works show particular sensitivity to the atmospheric effects of the changing weather and cloudscapes, for example ...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 25 November 1870, in Granville; died 13 November 1943, in St-Germain-en-Laye, in a traffic accident.

Painter, watercolourist, engraver, lithographer, draughtsman, illustrator, designer. Religious subjects, figure compositions, figures, nudes, portraits, rustic scenes, scenes with figures, landscapes, gardens, urban landscapes, church interiors, still-lifes...

Article

Finnish, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 24 March 1872, in Tampere.

Landscape artist.

Engberg was awarded a distinction at the 1900 Exposition Universelle.

Helsinki: Mediterranean Landscape

Article

(b New York, June 19, 1872; d Bar Harbor, ME, Feb 27, 1959).

American landscape designer. Born into a well connected family, she was introduced to important European gardens by her aunt, Edith Wharton. Farrand studied horticulture with Charles Sprague Sargent (1841–1927) at the Arnold Arboretum in Boston, MA, and in 1895 began practising as a landscape designer in New York. In 1899 she became a founder-member of the American Society of Landscape Architects. The landscapes of Beatrix Farrand can be seen today with some degree of completeness in only two major gardens: Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, DC (1922–33), and the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Garden (1926–late 1930s) at The Eyrie, Seal Harbor, on Mount Desert Island, ME. The rest of her designs—around 200 gardens—have disappeared. Remnants of a few are being rediscovered, and with the aid of the documentation she gave to the University of California at Berkeley, it may be possible to restore them. By the 1980s, Farrand had almost been forgotten; however, a symposium at Dumbarton Oaks inspired new research and brought her back into public view....