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German, 18th century, male.

Born 23 February 1696, in Wernfels; died 29 October 1765.

Sculptor. Religious subjects.

A court sculptor and architect, Matthias Seybold is the most important representative of the Rococo style in Eichstätt, Germany. His work was inspired by religion and was produced mainly for the cathedral of Eichstätt....

Article

Natália Marinho Ferreira Alves

(b Braga, Dec 18, 1731; d Tibães, Aug 30, 1808).

Portuguese designer, wood-carver, sculptor and architect.

His godfather, the Reverend Constantino da Cunha Soto Maior (d 1757), was treasurer of the Cathedral of Braga, and one of his brothers, João de Araújo Ferreira Vilaça (b 1720), was clerk to the Vicar General of Vila Real in Trás-os-Montes. Frei José’s early training was with his father, Custódio Ferreira, a skilled carpenter. In November 1754 Frei José signed his first contract to carve the retable of the high altar of the church of the convent of S Clara, Amarante. From 1757 he worked at Tibães, near Braga, the headquarters of the Benedictine Order in Portugal, where, with José de Álvares de Araújo, he collaborated on carving the magnificent talha (carved and gilded wood) designed for the church of S Martinho by André Ribeiro Soares da Silva. The work began with the high altar, for which Frei José carved the statues of SS Martinho, Bento and Escolástica, and the whole scheme, one of the finest in Portugal, was subsequently completed in ...

Article

German, 18th century, male.

Born 10 December 1710, in Ehrenstetten; died 1 July 1797, in Freiburg.

Sculptor, architect. Religious subjects. Statues.

Wenzinger was one of the most important Rococo sculptors in southern Germany. He sculpted statues, tombs and Ways of the Cross for several churches. From ...

Article

Christina Thon

Pilgrimage church situated 3 km south-east of Steingaden in Upper Bavaria, Germany. An outstanding work of Bavarian Rococo, it stands in a forest meadow against a background of the Trauchgau Mountains. It is the last collaborative work of the brothers Johann Baptist Zimmermann and Dominikus Zimmermann. About 1743 Abbot Hyazinth Gassner (d 1745) of the Premonstratensian monastery of Steingaden commissioned Dominikus Zimmermann to design a church to house a miraculous image of the Flagellation; Wies Church was executed in 1745–57. The nave, an elongated oval surrounded by eight pairs of supports in an alternately wide and narrow spacing ( see fig. ), opens on to an ambulatory. On the west side a vestibule with organ gallery was added, to the east a long choir with an apsidal end, flanked at ground-floor level by an ambulatory and on the upper floor by galleries. On the east side a tower and the priest’s house adjoin the building....