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Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 1930, in Bellingham (Washington State).

Engraver, lithographer, installation artist, sculptor.

Conceptual Art.

David Ireland studied industrial design and printmaking at the Californian College of Arts and Crafts, graduating in 1953. He worked as an architectural draughtsman, a carpenter and an African safari guide before returning to art education in the 1970s. In ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 27 May 1868, in Boston (Massachusetts); died 1948, in Norwalk (Connecticut).

Painter (mixed media), sculptor, engraver (etching), craftsman. Genre scenes, historical scenes, landscapes with figures, portraits.

Charles Prendergast was originally a frame and furniture maker in the Arts and Crafts style, making many frames for his brother, artist Maurice Prendergast. In the 1920s Charles began his own artistic career, developing a unique technique. He first did rough sketches of his compositions in crayon, charcoal or watercolour, then traced the designs on to a wooden panel coated in gesso. He dampened and incised the gesso, then smoothed the surface and painted upon it with tempera. Prendergast's early work, from his so-called celestial period between ...

Article

Michelle Yun

(b New York, NY, Dec 25, 1944).

American sculptor, draftsman and installation artist. Saret received a BArch from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, in 1966 and subsequently studied at Hunter College in New York under Robert Morris from 1966 to 1968. In the late 1960s his work was classified as part of the “anti-form” movement, which rejected the rigidity of Minimalism in favor of creating non-figurative works that were structured in part by the inherent physical properties of the industrial materials favored by this group.

Saret’s early sculptures from the 1960s and 1970s were primarily crafted from industrial metal wire of varying thickness, though he also sometimes used rubber, wire mesh or other non-art materials. They were often suspended from the ceiling or installed directly on the ground and exuded a weightless, ephemeral quality akin to clouds or gestural drawings rendered three-dimensionally. It was around this time, in 1967, that Saret began his ongoing Gang drawings series. These gestural drawings were initially created as preliminary studies for the sculptures and were produced by the artist spontaneously grabbing a handful, or “gang,” of colored pencils, thereby integrating an element of chance to the process....