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Natalia Marinho Ferreira Alves

Portuguese family of wood-carvers. Manuel Abreu do Ó and his brother Sebastião Abreu do Ó (both fl Évora c. 1728–c. 1770) worked in collaboration, carving some of the finest and most influential Joanine and Rococo altarpieces in southern Portugal. They carved in delicate flat relief using patterns similar to those found in Spain, a style contrasting with the dramatic plastic effects seen in contemporary wood-carving in northern Portugal....

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José Fernandes Pereira

Portuguese sculptor. He was the leading Portuguese sculptor of the mid-18th century, although only a small part of his work can be identified. He was sent to Rome by John V to study under Carlo Monaldi. Traces of his apprenticeship with Monaldi can be seen in his treatment of crumpled drapery. Almeida is known to have won a prize in a papal contest in competition with Italian sculptors. He returned to Lisbon about ...

Article

Portuguese wood-carver and designer. He designed the carved altarpieces, pulpits and valances for the church of the Third Order of St Francis in Ponte de Lima. The carving was completed in 1756 by António da Cunha Correia Vale and Manuel da Cunha Correia Vale from Guimarães. It is a fine example of carving in the new Rococo style. In ...

Article

Matthias Frehner

Swiss sculptor of German birth. He was apprenticed to the sculptor Peter Heel (1696–1767), but in 1732, after his father died, Babel became an itinerant journeyman sculptor. He appears to have moved gradually southwards, possibly drawn by the chance to study at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna and by the far greater number of commissions to be found there, from both secular and ecclesiastical patrons. In collaborating on large-scale decorative commissions, Babel would not only have acquired a solid training as a sculptor in stone and stucco but would also have learnt the stylistic vocabulary of international Baroque. A particularly strong early influence was the stuccowork of ...

Article

Term applied to a particular style of 18th-century Italian sculpture; it is also sometimes called early Rococo. Barocchetto statues are characterized by sweeping drapery patterns, open poses and dramatic gestures (for illustration see Rusconi, Camillo).

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Guilhem Scherf

French sculptor. He studied with Nicolas Coustou and won the Prix de Rome in 1705 with a low relief of Judith before Holofernes (untraced). He was in Rome from 1709 to 1712 and at the Villa Borghese made a marble copy of the Antique group of the ...

Article

Françoise de la Moureyre

French sculptor. He may have been trained by the elderly Etienne Le Hongre, but his supple and graceful style better reflects his long association with Corneille van Clève and is typical of the work produced by the sculptors working in France in the last decades of Louis XIV’s reign and during the Régence period. He executed decorative work at the Château Neuf de Meudon, Hauts-de-Seine (...

Article

Eva Zimmermann

German sculptor. He studied under the sculptor Johann Eucharius Hermann (d 1727) in Biberach an der Riss, but it is possible that he may have been more strongly influenced by the sculptor and stuccoist Diego Carlone, then working at Weingarten Abbey. In 1728...

Article

German, 18th century, male.

Born 1706, in Riedlingnen (Württemberg); died 1777, in Riedlingnen.

Sculptor. Religious subjects.

One of the sculptors of the German Rococo movement. With the cabinetmaker Martin Hermann he made the stalls of the Benedictine abbeys of Zwielfalten ( Scenes from the Life of the Virgin...

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Françoise de la Moureyre

French sculptor and bronze-caster. He came from a family of goldsmiths of Flemish origin who settled in Paris in the early 17th century. Early biographers state that he trained with Michel or François Anguier and at the Académie Royale. He spent six years at the Académie de France in Rome, where he is said to have studied above all the sculpture of Bernini. This was followed by four years in Venice. He applied for admission to the Académie in ...

Article

Clodion  

Glenn F. Benge

French sculptor. He was the greatest master of lyrical small-scale sculpture active in France in the later 18th century, an age that witnessed the decline of the Rococo, the rise of Romanticism and the cataclysms of revolution. Clodion’s works in terracotta embody a host of fascinating and still unresolved problems, questions of autograph and attribution, the chronology of his many undated designs, the artistic sources of his works, and the position of his lyric art in the radically changing society of his time. Little is known of the sculptural activity of Clodion’s brothers (see ...

Article

D. Signe Jones

Italian sculptor. He worked within the tradition of late Baroque classicism in Rome, moving, in his mature works, towards a Rococo style. He studied painting with Giovanni Maria Viani or Domenico Viani and sculpture perhaps with Giuseppe Mazza. Little of his early Bolognese work remains. He went to Rome in the 1730s and participated in numerous decorative schemes for major architectural projects. His contribution included several over life-size, marble statues: a ...

Article

Jean-Dominique Augarde

French cabinetmaker and sculptor. He was taught by his father, François Cressent, a sculptor in Amiens, and became a maître-ébéniste on 9 January 1708. He subsequently became a pupil of François Girardon and became a maître sculpteur in the Académie de Saint-Luc, Paris, on 14 August 1714...

Article

Barbara Daentler

German sculptor. He was the son of a cabinetmaker. In 1712–13 he began his travels as a journeyman from Eichstätt, where he probably trained under the sculptor Christian Handschuher (fl c. 1699–1701). He visited Prague, where he met Matyás Václav Jäckel, and Italy. Around ...

Article

French family of goldsmiths, bronze founders, sculptors and designers, of Italian descent. Due to the similarity in name, there has been some confusion between father and son and the attribution of their work; they are now generally distinguished as Duplessis père and Duplessis fils. Jean-Claude Chambellan Duplessis [Giovanni Claudio Chiamberlano] (...

Article

Spanish, 18th century, male.

Born 1677, in Seville; died 1757, in Cordova.

Sculptor.

Pedro Duque Cornejo y Roldan was one of the finest exponents of Rococo sculpture in Andalusia. He began by working on retables in Seville. In Granada he created and transformed the sculptural decoration of the church of the Virgen de las Angustias; for this he carved 14 statues showing ...

Article

Helmut Börsch-Supan

German sculptor. Before he moved to Berlin in 1746, he is thought to have worked in Italy, Leipzig and Dresden; two signed ivory reliefs in the Museum des Kunsthandwerks, Leipzig, were probably produced during his stay in that city. Ebenhech was particularly admired for his mastery of marble technique. Characteristic of his Rococo sculpture is a delicate treatment of surface with a minute attention to details, especially drapery folds, and a tendency towards a fragile decorativeness. His figures are slender, almost lean. Most of his works produced in Prussia are in the park of ...

Article

German, 18th century, male.

Born 9 April 1691, in Mannheim; died 10 January 1752, in Mannheim.

Sculptor.

Paul Egell trained under Balthasar Permoser in Dresden or Vienna around 1717. His main works are: decorations in the Rococo style for the gardens and palace of the 'Grand Elector' (German prince in the Holy Roman Empire who was entitled to elect the Emperor) in Schwetzingen; a funeral monument in Durlach; the ...

Article

Iris Kockelbergh

Belgian sculptor. He was the son of a sculptor and probably trained first with his father. All that is known of his work is his extensive contribution to the furnishing of the church of St Nicolas en Havré at Mons, on which he worked from ...

Article

Helena Bussers

Flemish sculptor. Until 1770 or 1771 he was apprenticed to Laurent Delvaux. His master’s influence with Charles of Lorraine, the Austrian Governor of the Netherlands, secured for him in 1769 an allowance during his whole period of training. Having moved to Paris and been accepted (...