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John Ford

[Rudolf]

(b Stollberg, Saxony, April 20, 1764; d Finchley, London, March 30, 1834).

English publisher and patron of German birth. He trained as a carriage designer in Paris and moved to England between 1783 and 1786. He established his own business as a carriage maker, undertaking major commissions in London and Dublin. In 1804 he designed Pius VII’s carriage for the coronation of Napoleon and in 1805 the funeral carriage of Horatio, Viscount Nelson. By 1800 Ackermann had built up a unique business at 101 The Strand, London, known as ‘The Repository of Arts’. This encompassed a drawing school with 80 pupils, the sale and loan of Old Master paintings and watercolour drawings, the publication of decorative prints and illustrated books and the manufacture of watercolour paints including a number of new chemical pigments.

In the early 19th century, Ackermann was an important and regular patron of English watercolour painters, employing William Henry Pyne, Augustus Charles Pugin, Thomas Heaphy, Frederick Mackenzie (1787–1854...

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Linda Whiteley

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Linda Whiteley

French family of typographers, printers, publishers and collectors. The first to settle in Paris was Denis Didot (2nd half of 17th century), whose son François Didot (1689–1759) founded in 1713 the family publishing business. His sons François-Ambroise Didot (1730–1804) and Pierre-François Didot (1731–93) developed the business, adding a type foundry and a paper-mill. The elegance of their publications brought them the patronage of the brothers of Louis XVI: Monsieur (later Louis XVIII) and the Comte d’Artois (later Charles X). The sons of François-Ambroise included (1) Pierre Didot, a publisher, among whose illustrators were some of the most distinguished artists of the day, and Firmin Didot (1764–1836), who designed the Didot typeface for his brother’s use. Firmin Didot’s son (2) Ambroise Firmin-Didot was a notable collector of prints. The cadet branch of the family, Didot Jeune, the descendants of Pierre-François Didot, included (3) ...

Article

(b London, April 14, 1720; d Corscombe, Dorset, Jan 1, 1774).

English collector, antiquary, patron and editor. He pursued humanistic and scientific studies under Dr John Ward, and in 1739/40 he was admitted at Lincoln’s Inn as a law student, and lived in chambers until 1748. During a trip to Venice, in 1750 or 1751, he made the acquaintance of Joseph Smith, who became a lifelong friend and correspondent, and who may have induced him to order six of the nine paintings by Canaletto he eventually owned. These included the larger version of Ranelagh: Interior of the Rotunda (London, N.G.), which showed the site from a different viewpoint to the version of 1751 (priv. col., see exh. cat., p. 91), and the acclaimed Walton Bridge (London, Dulwich Pict. Gal.), both of which were inscribed on the back in Italian as having been painted for Hollis in London in 1754. A third, large painting, described in the catalogue of the sale of the paintings by Canaletto in ...

Article

Madeleine Barbin

(b Orléans, May 7, 1695; d Paris, June 11, 1772).

French collector, engraver, print-publisher and print-seller. He was probably led to study engraving by his taste for collecting prints and drawings. He made no innovations in the engraving process, but used etching lightly reworked with the burin, a method suited to reproducing the sort of drawings that he usually chose as models, most of them coming from his own collection.

Huquier’s engravings are mostly of work by contemporaries, sometimes in the form of single engravings, but mostly in books of six, twelve, or sometimes more plates. They are rarely dated. He began by reproducing the works of Claude Gillot, including La Vie de Notre Seigneur Jésus-Christ (Bruand, Hébert and Sjöberg, nos 695–754) and Scènes comiques du Théatre italien (c. 1729–32; bhs 755–66). Among other works by Antoine Watteau, he engraved 12 arabesques (bhs 1711–44) for the Recueil Jullienne. He also engraved Edme Bouchardon’s Livre de vases...

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Hélène Guicharnaud

(b Marseille, 1672; d Paris, Oct 1744).

French soldier, editor, writer, patron and collector. The son of a family of merchants, he travelled widely in his youth, both in France and abroad, including a journey to Constantinople (now Istanbul) and the Levant. On his return to Marseille he began but never finished a history of painters and a history of theatrical productions, projects that reveal his artistic and literary interests, as does his affiliation to the Marseille Académie Royale, of which his brother Jean de La Roque (1661–1745) was a founder-member. He fought in the War of the Spanish Succession, losing a leg at the Battle of Malplaquet (1709), for which he won the Croix de St Louis and was awarded a pension by Louis XIV. He was a member of the circle of Philippe II, Duc d’Orléans, Regent of France after the death of Louis XIV in 1715, and he also knew many artists and writers, himself writing operas, including ...

Article

(b Vienna, Sept 7, 1759; d Argonne, Sept 13, 1792).

French soldier, publisher and collector. With his father, Prince Charles-Joseph de Ligne (1735–1814), he operated an important publishing house at the Château de Belœil, Haincourt (now in Belgium), though he was also an officer in the engineering corps and in fact died in battle. Described by Adam von Bartsch as one of the finest connoisseurs of his time, de Ligne assembled a collection of over 2587 Old Master and contemporary drawings, many of which had derived from the collections of Giorgio Vasari, Pierre Crozat, Jean Mariette and Jean de Jullienne. These works included 48 by Raphael, 11 by Michelangelo, 8 by Leonardo, 11 by Dürer, 26 by Rembrandt and 15 by Poussin but relatively few by 18th-century French and English masters. To complement his collection of drawings, de Ligne acquired over 13,500 prints, especially original etchings and facsimiles of drawings. Bartsch’s illustrated catalogue of de Ligne’s drawings collection includes etchings made by de Ligne himself, after drawings; 35 of his etchings (primarily after Italian drawings) were published as a collection. According to the terms of his will, his collection was sold (Vienna, ...

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Linda Whiteley

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(b Weesp, Jan 4, 1726; d Amsterdam, Dec 20, 1798).

Dutch timber merchant, collector, printmaker, print publisher, draughtsman and art theorist. He was one of the most important Dutch dilettanti of the 18th century. His interest in art began at an early age, and from the age of 12 he was taught drawing by Norbert van Bloemen (1670–1746). Two years later he began to learn the timber trade with Johannes Bontekoning, in whose firm, Bontekoning and Aukes, he became a partner in 1756. Ploos’s first mezzotint dates from that year. He made drawings throughout his life, in a technically skilled rather than original style, and designed book illustrations. In 1758 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Cornelis Troost.

In the meantime Ploos van Amstel assembled a fabulous collection of drawings (he possessed over 7000 when he died), prints (including many topographical prints of Amsterdam), paintings, sculptures, enamels, medals, coins, scientific instruments and optical tools, and manuscripts and printed books. His special interest in drawings, particularly those by Dutch artists from the 17th and 18th centuries, is reflected in his ...

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Susse  

Linda Whiteley

French family of bronze-founders, bronze-casters, dealers, publishers, paper merchants and artists’ suppliers. Jean Susse (1726–1809) was a cabinetmaker in Paris. His two sons Nicolas Susse and Michel-Victor Susse (b Paris, 1782; d Paris, 1853) went into partnership in 1806, opening a shop for fine writing-paper in the Passage des Panoramas, Paris. By 1816 they had also begun to sell artists’ materials and in 1827 they opened a further branch at 31, Place de la Bourse. Their business brought them into contact with several artists whose work they occasionally bought or took in exchange. Paul Gavarni owed his first success to drawings and paintings he exhibited at the Galerie Susse. The business soon became one of the best known in Paris for the sale and hire of contemporary paintings, to which the brothers added the publishing of artists’ manuals. Michel-Victor Susse’s eldest son, Victor Susse (b...