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Article

British, 19th century, male.

Active in South Africa.

Born 1820, in King’s Lynn (Norfolk), England; died 1875, in Durban, South Africa.

Painter (oils, watercolours), printmaker (etching), draughtsman, explorer, cartographer, writer. Landscapes, marine and seascapes, portraits, natural history and ethnographic subjects.

Thomas Baines arrived at the Cape in ...

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Active in South Africa.

Born 1812, in Hertfordshire, England; died 1869, in London.

Painter (watercolour and oil), lithographer, draughtsman (chalk). Town scenes; landscapes, seascapes.

Thomas Bowler arrived at the Cape in 1834 with the newly appointed Royal Astronomer Thomas McClear. He tutored the children of the Commander of Robben Island ...

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Active in South Africa.

Born 1802, in Islington, London; died 1887, in Grahamstown, South Africa.

Painter (oils, watercolours), draughtsman (pen and wash), cartoonist. Portraits, landscapes, genre scenes of frontier life.

After taking lessons from sculptor John Francis, Frederick I’Ons started an art school in Marylebone in London, where he taught drawing and painting along with commercial subjects. In November ...

Article

South African, 20th – 21st century, male.

Active in Belgium.

Born 1946, in Johannesburg.

Painter, lithographer.

Symbolism.

Gabriel Meiring studied piano before becoming a self-taught visual artist. His work is an interpretation of the former 'Modern Style'.

Article

Blanca García Vega

(b Málaga, Aug 15, 1821; d Madrid, Feb 19, 1882).

Spanish lithographer, illustrator and painter. In 1859 he enlisted for the African Campaign in Morocco, and the studies he did in Africa led to drawings for an atlas of the battles in Africa (Madrid, 1860), as well as those for Crónicas de la guerra de Africa (Madrid, 1859) by Emilio Castelar and for Diario (Madrid, 1859–60) by the novelist Pedro Antonio de Alarcón (1833–91). He promoted a section for lithography at the Escuela de Artes y Oficios in Madrid. An excellent portraitist, he also made numerous drawings and illustrations for newspapers, royal chronicles and for Iconografia española (Madrid, 1855–64) by Valentín Carderera y Solano, as well as lithographs of bullfights. He provided decorative works for various public buildings in Madrid and the provinces.

A. Canovas: Pintores malaqueños del siglo XIX (Málaga, 1908) A. Gallego: Historia del grabado en España (Madrid, 1979), p. 356 E. Paez Rios...

Article

Esmé Berman

( Willem Frederick )

(b The Hague, Sept 9, 1873; d Pretoria, Jan 24, 1921).

South African painter and printmaker of Dutch birth. He was a self-taught artist and left Holland in 1905 to take up employment in the Pretoria branch of a Dutch bookselling firm. He painted and etched landscapes and still-lifes during weekends only until 1916, when a group of patrons made it possible for him to spend three months painting full-time in Cape Town. He found the misty winter climate of the Cape peninsula, being closer to the atmosphere of his homeland than the harsh, sunlit expanses of the Transvaal, suited to his temperament and style. During that and later visits he produced enough saleable work to repay his benefactors and to continue painting full-time. Unfortunately his practice of working incessantly outdoors, regardless of inclement weather, also undermined the fragile health that had originally driven him from Holland.

Although Wenning revelled in the wooded landscapes of the Cape, he eschewed the picture-postcard sentimentality typical of the work of most of his contemporaries. His formats are small, but the flat colour planes and decorative, rhythmical contours—both especially pronounced in his still-life studies—are brisk and confident, as in ...

Article

Marcia Pointon

(b London, 1806; d Paris, Dec 25, 1889).

English painter and lithographer . The son of a businessman, Wyld worked initially in the diplomatic service, acting as secretary to the British consul in Calais. While there, he encountered Louis Francia and, through him, the work of his protégé Richard Parkes Bonington. He also met John Lewis Brown, a keen collector of Bonington watercolours, and became a lifelong friend of Horace Vernet. From 1827 to 1833 Wyld was in charge of a wine business in Epernay, where he pursued the interest in art he had conceived under the influence of these artists. He acquired a circle of patrons in the region.

Wyld made his début in the Salon in 1831 and three years later became a full-time artist. A journey to North Africa in 1833 resulted in Voyage pittoresque dans la régence d’Alger pendant l’année 1833 in collaboration with the lithographer Emile Lessore (1805–76). Although Wyld retained his British nationality, he worked and exhibited mainly in France. His speciality was highly worked and often brilliantly coloured views of capital cities, in watercolour or gouache (or occasionally oil), depicted from a distance in evening or early morning light (e.g. ...