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Article

Ajouré  

Gordon Campbell

French term for openwork, used in the decorative arts principally with reference to metalwork, bookbinding and heraldry. In metalwork, it denotes the piercing or perforation of sheet metal, a practice found as early as the ancient Egyptian period. In bookbinding, the term ajouré binding refers to a style that emerged in late 15th-century Venice in which bindings were embellished with pierced or translucent patterns, typically open designs of foliage. In heraldry, an ...

Article

Kirk Ambrose

(b Moscow, May 7, 1903; d Paris, Jan 25, 1988).

Lithuanian art historian, scholar of folklore and Egyptology, and diplomat of Russian birth. Son of the celebrated Lithuanian Symbolist poet of the same name, Jurgis Baltrušaitis II studied under Henri(-Joseph) Focillon at the Sorbonne and earned the PhD in 1931. The concerns of his mentor are evident in La stylistique ornementale dans la sculpture romane (1931), which reprises and extends arguments for the ‘law of the frame’ in Romanesque sculpture. Accordingly, the shapes of architectural members, such as capitals and tympana, determined the articulation of sculptural forms. This theory could account for the genesis of a wide array of monumental carvings, from foliate capitals to narrative reliefs, but ultimately it had a rather limited impact on the field of Romanesque sculptural studies. In a scathing critique, Schapiro argued that Baltrušaitis’s book—and by implication Focillon’s methods—robbed Romanesque sculptors of agency and neglected the religious and expressive meanings of this art form....

Article

Egyptian, 20th century, female.

Active in Lebanon.

Born 1945, in Alexandria.

Painter, graphic designer, illustrator. Figure compositions, figures.

Mouna Bassili Sehnaoui studied for two years at the American University in Beirut, Lebanon, and completed her higher education at the University of Arizona in Tucson where she was awarded a diploma in graphic art and painting. She also won the first prize at the university's exhibition of students' works in ...

Article

Tunisian, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 16 January 1947, in Tunis.

Illustrator, caricaturist, painter.

Belkhamsa Chedli spent two brief periods at the schools of fine art in Tunis and Paris. He works mostly for Tunisian newspapers and magazines. In 1983, he was awarded first prize for his cartoons by the association of Tunisian journalists. As well as his work as a cartoonist, he has also painted acrylics on canvas, works that display considerable care, precision and elegance. The themes of these paintings are taken from the world of fantasy, and are painted in cartoon style....

Article

Algerian, 20th century, male.

Active in France since 1953.

Born 1931, in Mestghanem.

Painter, engraver, illustrator, painter (gouache), watercolourist. Designs for tapestries.

Abdallah Benanteur began his artistic studies at the school of fine art in Oran, completing them at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris. He settled in Paris in 1953. From 1972 to 1976, he taught in the architecture department of the École des Beaux-Arts and at the École des Arts Décoratifs in Paris....

Article

Egyptian, 20th century, male.

Born 1940, in Cairo.

Painter, watercolourist, illustrator, decorative artist. Decorative motifs. Stage costumes and sets, designs for jewellery.

A pupil at the Académie Julian, the École des Arts Decoratifs and the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, Georges Doche went on to show his work in several public exhibitions and, in particular, at the Salon des Artistes Indépendants in Paris, as well as at several private galleries in Geneva, Tokyo and London. He had a number of solo exhibitions, including in Paris (...

Article

Tunisian, 20th century, male.

Active also active in France.

Born 1918, in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Painter, illustrator, draughtsman. Cartoon films.

Hatem El Mekki was born in Indonesia but moved to Tunisia in 1924. He started to exhibit his works at the Salon Tunisien in 1934. In ...

Article

Michael Curschmann

The medieval term mappa mundi (also forma mundi, historia/istoire) covers a broad array of maps of the world of which roughly 1100 survive. These have resisted systematic classification, but the clearly dominant type is one that aims at comprehensively symbolistic representation. Its early, schematic form is a disc composed of three continents surrounded and separated from one another by water (“T-O Map”) and associated with the three sons of Noah: Asia (Shem) occupies all of the upper half, Europe (Japhet) to the left and Africa (Ham) to the right share the lower half. Quadripartite cartographic schemes included the antipodes as a fourth continent, but the tripartite model was adopted by the large majority of the more developed world maps in use from the 11th century on and—with important variations—well into the Renaissance. While details were added as available space permitted, the Mediterranean continued to serve as the vertical axis and, with diminishing clarity, the rivers Don and Nile as the horizontal one. The map also continues to be ‘oriented’ towards Asia, where paradise sits at the very top. A circular ocean forms the perimeter and not infrequently the city of Jerusalem constitutes its centre....

Article

Morocco  

Article

Tunisian, 20th century, male.

Active in France since 1962.

Born 15 December 1917, in Tunis.

Painter, illustrator. Murals.

Nouvelle Figuration, Figuration Narrative.

Edgard Naccache, a self-taught artist, started painting in 1931. In 1948 and 1961, he travelled in France; in 1957 he stayed in the Netherlands and the following year in Italy. He was a founding member of the ...

Article

Egyptian, 20th century, male.

Born 1926, in Paris.

Painter, illustrator. Wall decorations.

Samir Rafi won the national award for fine arts in Cairo with his composition Time. In 1946, he formed the Contemporary Art association, with the aim of returning to specifically Egyptian inspiration and breaking away from the School of Paris. In ...

Article

Egyptian, 20th century, male.

Born 1939, in Abnoub El-Hamam.

Painter, watercolourist, illustrator. Figure compositions, figures, animals, landscapes, nudes.

Adli Rizkallah seems to have lived in Paris between 1973 and 1978, before returning to Cairo. His figure compositions are highly elliptical, especially the watercolours; a light outline containing a finely moulded volume is used to indicate human forms and the sparse elements of the setting. Since ...

Article

Rachel Milstein

[Codex Petropolitanus ; Leningrad Codex]

Illuminated Hebrew Bible (St Petersburg, N. Lib., MS. Firk. Heb. I B 19A), copied in Fustat, Egypt, in 1008–10. Written in ink and lavishly illuminated in gold, blue, and red at the end, this codex of 491 vellum leaves is the only complete Hebrew Bible from the early medieval Near East. It was copied between 1008 and 1010 by Shmuel ben Ya’aqov for Mevorakh ben Yoseph in Fustat (Old Cairo), probably in a Karaite milieu. (The Karaites are a Jewish sect that denies the Talmudic rabbinical tradition and recognizes the Scriptures as the sole and direct source of religious law.) By the 14th century the manuscript was given to the Karaite Synagogue in Damascus and in that town it was purchased by Abraham Firkovich (1786–1874) in the 19th century.

Following a common practice in medieval Hebrew Bibles, the illumination of the St Petersburg Bible comprises mainly micrographic Masoratic notes (sets of grammatical variations taken from the Holy Script). These notes, together with Psalm verses and blessings, form discrete, monochromatic, and semi-abstract motifs in the margins of the text, or serve as outlines in full-page compositions. The scribe of the St Petersburg Bible points out in the colophon that he himself added the vocalization and the Masorah. These assume a decorative form of roundels only under the verses of the first song of Moses (Exodus 15:10–19, fols 40...

Article

Blanca García Vega

(b Málaga, Aug 15, 1821; d Madrid, Feb 19, 1882).

Spanish lithographer, illustrator and painter. In 1859 he enlisted for the African Campaign in Morocco, and the studies he did in Africa led to drawings for an atlas of the battles in Africa (Madrid, 1860), as well as those for Crónicas de la guerra de Africa (Madrid, 1859) by Emilio Castelar and for Diario (Madrid, 1859–60) by the novelist Pedro Antonio de Alarcón (1833–91). He promoted a section for lithography at the Escuela de Artes y Oficios in Madrid. An excellent portraitist, he also made numerous drawings and illustrations for newspapers, royal chronicles and for Iconografia española (Madrid, 1855–64) by Valentín Carderera y Solano, as well as lithographs of bullfights. He provided decorative works for various public buildings in Madrid and the provinces.

A. Canovas: Pintores malaqueños del siglo XIX (Málaga, 1908) A. Gallego: Historia del grabado en España (Madrid, 1979), p. 356 E. Paez Rios...