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Article

Acestor  

5th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the 5th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Cnossus.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Acestor is believed to be the father of Amphion, who was sometimes - though wrongly - credited with the Delphic Charioteer...

Article

3rd century, male.

Active in Argos.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Acestor worked in collaboration with Toron, son of Apellion, also from Argos, on a votive statue from Troezen.

Article

5th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 5th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Selinus (Selinunte), Sicily.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Acron's name appears at Delphi on a base for two statues ( Asclepius and Hygieia?) offered by Philistion, a devotee of Asclepius. The inscription dates from before 400 BC....

Article

Aesopus  

6th century, male.

Active in Attica in the first quarter of the 6th century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Aesopus' name, together with a reference to his brothers, was found in Attic characters on a base from Sigea in the Troad (the area around Troy).

Article

5th century, male.

Active in Athens in the second half of the 5th century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek, Classical Period.

Living at Alopeke (near Athens), Agathanor was a foreigner recorded as having received payment for work on the friezes of the Erechtheum in 408-407 BC....

Article

4th century, male.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Agatharchus is known from a signature from Thasos (dedication to Pan and Aphrodite).

Article

4th century, male.

Wrongly described as a sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Agathinus is known from a signature on the marble tree trunk supporting a now-lost statue from Privernum.

Article

3rd century, male.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

A scene bearing Agathon's signature and showing the priest Aristis worshipping Horus, dating from around 250 BC, was found between the temples of Apollo and Isis at Cyrene.

Article

Agathon  

3rd century, male.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Born in Ephesus in the first half of the 3rd century BC, Agathon collaborated with Ariston of Chios on a votive offering from Timotheus son of Euphanes. The sculptor's signature was found on the Acropolis at Lindos (datable to c. 270 BC)....

Article

6th – 5th century, male.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek, archaic and pre-classical period.

School of Argos..

Ageladas, founder of the Argos school, was thought in ancient times to have been the teacher of Polyclitus. Other pupils were thought to have been Phidias of Athens and Myron of Eleutheres....

Article

Charles M. Edwards

[Hageladas]

(fl c. 520–c. 450 bc).

Greek sculptor. Said to be the teacher of Polykleitos, Myron and Pheidias, he was a bronze sculptor from Argos, active in the Late Archaic and Early Classical periods. His early works were statues at Olympia for victors of 520 bc, 516 bc and 507 bc. His monument at Delphi depicting captive Massapian women and horses may belong to the second quarter of the 5th century bc. The Zeus Ithomatas for the Messenians at Naupaktos was probably made in the 450s bc. A problem is posed by the date of his Herakles Alexikakos in Athens, said to be a dedication after the plague in the 420s bc. That has led to speculation on the existence of a second Ageladas. The dates of his Zeus Pais and Youthful Herakles at Aigion are unknown. The statues for the Messenians and at Aigion seem to have been under life-size since they were easily transportable. A sense of their appearance is given by coins that show statues with stances like that of the ...

Article

5th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 5th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Paros.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek, Classical Period.

Agoracritus was the first in a long line of artists from Paros to find fortune in Attica. He was one of Phidias' closest pupils, becoming the latter's favourite at the time of that sculptor's mature period. A passage in Pliny ( ...

Article

A. Delivorrias

(b Paros, fl c. 450–c. 420 bc).

Greek sculptor. He was a prominent member of the group of artists led by Pheidias that executed the Periclean building programme on the Athenian Acropolis. Ancient literary sources provide little information on his career, and even this takes the form of later anecdotes, such as the story of his rivalry with Alkamenes in a competition to produce a statue of Aphrodite (Pliny: Natural History, XXXVI.iv.17), or has been distorted by the legends surrounding Pheidias, to whom two of his works were wrongly attributed: his statue of the Enthroned Mother of the Gods in the metroon in the Athenian Agora (Pausanias: Guide to Greece, I.iii.5) and his cult statue of Nemesis (c. 420 bc; Pausanias: I.xxxiii.3) for the temple at Rhamnous. The Nemesis was allegedly carved out of a colossal block of Parian marble brought to Marathon in 490 bc by the Persians, who intended to use it for a trophy after defeating the Athenians (Pausanias: I.xxxiii.2). Agorakritos was also credited with bronze statues of ...

Article

5th century, male.

Active at the end of the 5th century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek, Classical Period.

Alcamenes was probably the son of an Athenian cleruch (a colonist who retained Athenian citizenship) living in Lemnos. A follower of his contemporary Phidias, he worked chiefly in Athens and was a representative of the Attic School. Doubt surrounds the dating of his work. According to Pausanias, he executed the west pediment of the Temple of Zeus at Olympia (c. 460 BC). Another written source attributes to him a statue of Thrasybulus at the Heracleion in Thebes (in 403 BC). Such longevity seems unlikely, and a number of scholars have posited the existence of an Elder and a Younger Alcamenes. More simply, it is probable that Alcamenes' name remained linked with the west pediment at Olympia at the time of later repairs (c. 421 BC ?). The most reliable dating comes from a reference to a ...

Article

4th century, male.

Born to a family originally from Paros.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Alcippus' name appears on a base found at Anaphe (near Thera). The inscription can be dated to the beginning of the 4th century BC.

Article

5th – 4th century, male.

Active at the end of the 5th and beginning of the 4th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Athens.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Aleuas' name is known from two inscriptions on votive statues from the Acropolis of Lindos. These may date from c. 400 BC. This sculptor may have been confused with another mentioned in Pliny....

Article

Alexis  

5th century, male.

Active at the end of the 5th century BC.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Alexis is mentioned by Pliny as being one of the followers of Polyclitus (school of Argos).

Article

A. Delivorrias

(fl second half of the 5th century bc).

Greek sculptor. His date of birth and origins are uncertain; later sources mention both Athens and Lemnos as his birthplace. After the departure of Pheidias to Olympia, Alkamenes became the most eminent exponent of Athenian art. Sources that regard him as a student of Pheidias are not reliable, and the workshop in which he trained and developed his stylistic idiom is unknown. The number of his works in Athenian public buildings and the fact that Thrasybulus entrusted him with the production of a commemorative monument for his Theban allies after the fall of the Tyranny in 403 bc implies that Alkamenes was a supporter of the democratic party.

This monument, the form of which is difficult to visualize, is Alkamenes’ last attested work. His earliest work remains unknown, despite increasing acceptance of the assertion by Pausanias (V.x.8) that Alkamenes helped to execute the architectural sculptures of the Temple of Zeus at Olympia. Two ‘archaistic’ works for the Athenian Acropolis indicate that he must already have been active before the mid-...

Article

Alxenor  

5th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the 5th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Naxos.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek, Archaic Period.

Alxenor's name appears on a funerary stele found at Orchomenusin Boeotia (a bearded man wearing a himation (cloak) and leaning on a long stick, playing with a dog to which he is offering a grasshopper). The work and the inscription date from 490-480 BC. Despite elements of archaic art, Alxenor's stele is remarkable for the accuracy of its rendering of anatomy and the flowing movement of the figures....

Article

Alypus  

5th century, male.

Active in Sicyon.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Alypus was a follower of a certain Naucydes of Argos and a contemporary of Polyclitus. He made a number of statues of athletes for Olympia and also worked at Delphi around 405 BC, where he made an ex-voto (offering made in fulfilment of a vow) offered by Lysander and the Spartan victors....