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Article

Carlos Cid Priego

Spanish sculptor. He entered the Escuela de Bellas Artes de la Lonja, Barcelona, when still very young and was a student of the Neo-classical artist Damián Campeny y Estrany, who was also influenced by Romanticism and naturalism. In 1855 Aleu y Teixidor applied for the Chair in Modelling at the Escuela, a position to which he was eventually appointed after the committee had been involved in intrigues and disputes. He taught Catalan sculptors for half a century and wielded an enormous, though not entirely positive, influence. He became Deputy Director of the Escuela de Bellas Artes, belonged to the Academia de Ciencias y Artes of Barcelona and won first prize at the Exposición Nacional de Madrid in ...

Article

Glenn F. Benge

French sculptor, painter and printmaker. Barye was a realist who dared to present romantically humanized animals as the protagonists of his sculpture. Although he was a successful monumental sculptor, he also created a considerable body of small-scale works and often made multiple casts of his small bronze designs, marketing them for a middle-class public through a partnership, ...

Article

Lucília Verdelho da Costa

Between 1846 and 1852 he studied drawing and history painting under António Manuel da Fonseca at the Academia de Belas-Artes in Lisbon. In 1854 he became a drawing teacher at the Universidade de Coimbra, and in 1860 he taught sculpture at the Academia de Belas-Artes....

Article

He first trained with Pierre Lacour the elder (1745–1814) in Bordeaux and on going to Paris studied with François André Vincent and then Jacques-Louis David. While a pupil of David, he became friendly with both François-Marius Granet and Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres. Bergeret played a major role in introducing ...

Article

Italian, 19th century, male.

Born 1837, in Milan.

Sculptor.

Studied under Cacciatori at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera in Milan, then in Florence and Rome; exhibited in Italy and abroad. In addition to sculpting classical and romantic motifs, Bianchi provided decorative sculptures for the tombs of the Lombardi brothers in Rome's Campo Verano and the tombs of his own mother and of the Puricellu family in Milan cemetery. Not least, he sculpted decorations for an altar table in the church of S. Maria delle Grazie in Brescia....

Article

British, 19th century, female.

Painter, watercolourist, sculptor.

Marianne Birch was the wife of the poet Alphonse de Lamartine. In 2003 she was represented at the exhibition Lamartine and the Romantic Landscape Around Paul Huet at the Museé des Ursulines and the Museé Lamartine at Mâcon....

Article

German, 19th century, male.

Born 1831, in Dresden; died 1893, in Kassel.

Sculptor. Figures, portraits.

A son of Emil Cauer the Elder, he worked in Bad Kreuznach. His work reflects a number of themes popular in classical poetry and romanticism: Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, Puss in Boots...

Article

Clodion  

Glenn F. Benge

French sculptor. He was the greatest master of lyrical small-scale sculpture active in France in the later 18th century, an age that witnessed the decline of the Rococo, the rise of Romanticism and the cataclysms of revolution. Clodion’s works in terracotta embody a host of fascinating and still unresolved problems, questions of autograph and attribution, the chronology of his many undated designs, the artistic sources of his works, and the position of his lyric art in the radically changing society of his time. Little is known of the sculptural activity of Clodion’s brothers (see ...

Article

Philip Ward-Jackson

French sculptor. A remarkably comprehensive view of this most prolific of 19th-century sculptors is provided by the collection of his work in the Musée des Beaux-Arts et Galerie David d’Angers in Angers. Begun in 1839 from models for the sculptor’s public statues that he had consistently sent to his home town, the collection was enriched after his death by numerous donations; in ...

Article

Gilles Chazal

French illustrator, painter and sculptor. He was born into a cultivated and well-to-do family. By the age of five he was drawing on every piece of paper that came within his reach. He was particularly fond of caricaturing his parents, friends and teachers. In 1838...

Article

Antoinette Le Normand-Romain

French sculptor. Son of a sculptor of the same name (1729–1816) and a pupil of F.-J. Bosio, he entered the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in 1818 and won the Prix de Rome in 1823. Among his works executed at the Académie de France in Rome is ...

Article

Antoinette Le Normand-Romain

French sculptor, painter, etcher, architect and writer. The son of a decorative sculptor, he entered the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, in 1824 as a pupil of Charles Dupaty (1771–1825), moving in 1825 to the studio of James Pradier. Ingres also took an interest in his education, and Etex’s gratitude towards him and Pradier was later expressed in projects for monuments to them (that to Pradier not executed, that in bronze to Ingres erected Montauban, Promenade des Carmes, ...

Article

Philip Ward-Jackson

French sculptor. Daughter of a Breton banker, she studied drawing with the painters Louis Hersent and Claude Guillot (fl 1841–66). In her Salon début in 1827, her dramatic historical relief of Queen Christina and Monaldeschi (plaster; Louviers, Mus. Mun.) indicated a debt to her painter friends Paul Delaroche and Ary Scheffer. Passionately loyal to the elder Bourbons, she played a part in the Vendée uprising of ...

Article

Philip Ward-Jackson

French sculptor. Like Antoine-Louis Barye, Gechter was a pupil of François-Joseph Bosio and Baron Gros. His first Salon exhibits in 1824 had heroic Classical and mythological subjects. After 1830 he followed the example of Barye in turning to small-scale sculpture, usually including animals, but without Barye’s zoological bias. After being shown at the Salon in ...

Article

French painter, draughtsman, lithographer, and sculptor. He experienced the exaltation of Napoleon’s triumphs in his boyhood, reached maturity at the time of the empire’s agony, and ended his career of little more than 12 working years in the troubled early period of the Restoration. When he died, he was known to the public only by the three paintings he had exhibited at the Salon in Paris, the ...

Article

Belgian, 20th century, male.

Born 1959, in Merksem; died 1984.

Sculptor.

Van Hoeydonck attended the art academy in Mechelen. He produced classical work which is not without a certain romanticism.

Article

M. Puls

German sculptor. From 1833 to 1837 he studied in Munich under Ludwig von Schwanthaler and then lived in Paris until 1839. That year he returned to Wiesbaden and in 1842 went to Rome. There he met Friedrich Overbeck and was influenced by his designs for sculptures. Hoffmann lived in Cologne from ...

Article

Marica Magni

Italian sculptor. He studied briefly at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera in Milan and subsequently attended the studio of the Neo-classical sculptor Abbondio Sangiorgio (1798–1879). In his later artistic activity he was deeply influenced by the purity of the work of the Tuscan sculptor Lorenzo Bartolini, whose ...

Article

Philip Ward-Jackson

Italian sculptor. His father, Vincenzo Marochetti, was a prominent advocate and functionary. The family moved to Paris shortly after Carlo’s birth. Marochetti trained with François-Joseph Bosio and, after failing to win the Prix de Rome, travelled to Italy in 1822 at his own expense. On his return he showed ...

Article

Czech, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 20 June 1848, in Prague; died 1922, in Prague.

Sculptor.

Josef Vaclav Myslbek was Karel Myslbek's father and was a representative of Czech Romanticism. There are many of his sculptures in Prague, notably the equestrian statue in Wenceslas Square, and other Bohemian towns....