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Article

Brazilian, 18th century, male.

Born c. 1738, in Vila Rica (now Ouro Prêto), Minas Gerais; died 18 November 1814, in Villa Rica.

Sculptor.

Aleijadinho studied European style from engravings and prints in contemporary journals of architecture. He was fascinated by the elaborate Rococo style and southern German religious representations. He was given the nickname Aleijadinho (the little cripple) because of an illness that progressively destroyed his fingers and toes from ...

Article

Myriam A. Ribeiro de Oliveira and Liliana Herrera

In 

See Lisboa family

Article

Maria Concepción García Sáiz

Spanish architect and sculptor, active in Mexico. Between 1702 and 1703 he worked in Madrid as a designer of stage machinery, later moving to Andalusia, where he produced the principal altar of the sacristy of Seville Cathedral in the Rococo style, completed in 1709 (destr. ...

Article

Jorge Luján-Muñoz

Guatemalan painter, printmaker, and medallist. He entered the mint in 1795 as an apprentice engraver but on the recommendation of its director, Pedro Garci-Aguirre, also became Master Corrector at the Escuela de Dibujo de la Sociedad Económica de Amigos del País, Guatemala City, in 1796...

Article

Argentinian, 18th century, male.

Born c. 1740, in Salta.

Painter, sculptor. History painting.

Tomás Cabrera was the creator of an historic picture of great significance to Argentina: Tomás Matorras, Governor of Tucuman, and the Cacique, Paykin, Signing the Peace in Chaco, dated 1774.

Buenos Aires (Mus. Histórico Nacional): ...

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Ricardo Descalzi

Ecuadorean sculptor. An Indian nicknamed Caspicara (wooden face), he lived in Quito, and his name and work were discovered in 1791 by the doctor and journalist Eugenio Espejo. He was a pupil of Bernardo de Legarda. He is considered the outstanding sculptor of religious images in polychromed wood of the colonial period in ...

Article

Mexican, 18th century, male.

Active in Puebla.

Sculptor.

Cor's best known work is a St Cristopher that hangs in the church of St Christopher in Puebla.

Article

Mexican, 18th century, male.

Active in Puebla.

Sculptor.

A statue of Santa Teresa in the Church of S Teresa, Puebla, is attributed to José Cora.

Article

Roberto Pontual

Brazilian sculptor and wood-carver. His earliest surviving works, mainly commissioned from religious fraternities and all located in Rio de Janeiro, date from the late 1770s. His surviving work, typical of the transition from Baroque-Rococo to Neo-classicism, includes the carving on the main altar of the noviciate chapel of the church of Carmo and the altar of the church of S Francisco de Paula; the statues of ...

Article

Jorge Luján-Muñoz

Guatemalan family of sculptors. Antonio Joseph de Gálvez was a master carpenter and mason. Few of his works are known. In 1720 he contracted with S Francisco, Santiago de Guatemala (now Antigua), to make the monumento (altar) used on Maundy Thursdays. He was in charge of the rebuilding of the monastic hospital of S Pedro in Santiago de Guatemala. His son ...

Article

Kelly Donahue-Wallace

Spanish printmaker, medallist, and type designer, active in Spain and Mexico. He was one of the first students at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de S Fernando in Madrid (founded 1752), which awarded him a pension to train as a medallist from 1754 to 1758...

Article

Fine arts institutions with a structured curriculum led by professors or directors, financed by the Spanish monarchy in colonial times and national governments thereafter. Academies of fine arts in Latin America descend from mid-18th-century developments in Spain, which were based on the model of the French royal academies founded in the 17th century. The Spanish monarchy sponsored a number of drawing schools and three royal art academies in the second half of the 18th century, including the academies of S Fernando in Madrid (...

Article

Ricardo Descalzi

Ecuadorean wood-carver and painter. He was a pupil of José Olmos, and he set up his workshop in Quito facing the Franciscan monastery for which he worked. A versatile artist, he was also active as a gold- and silversmith, printer, and gunsmith. In 1736 Legarda carved his masterful ...

Article

Myriam A. Ribeiro de Oliveira and Liliana Herrera

Portuguese family of artists, active in Brazil. The architect (1) Manoel Francisco Lisboa often appears in the history of Brazilian art only as the father of (2) Antônio Francisco Lisboa. He was, however, the leading architect in the gold-mining province of Minas Gerais in the mid-18th century and was responsible for most of the secular and ecclesiastical buildings that give Ouro Prêto (formerly Vila Rica) its present individual appearance. His brother, the carpenter and master mason ...

Article

Venezuelan, 18th century, male.

Born 23 June 1724, in Caracas; died 1787.

Painter, sculptor, gilder.

Juan Pedro López embodies the Creole prosperity and nationalism characteristic of Venezuela in the second half of the 18th century when Venezuela made the transition from a quasi-medieval form of expression to a post-Renaissance style. López and Landaeta were the main representatives of this development. The most important painter in Caracas in the second half of the 18th century, according to Alfredo Boulton, López was also a prolific artist, producing over 150 oil paintings during his 40 year career. This abundance reflects the strong economic development enjoyed in Venezuela at this period. Most of his commissions were for churches in Caracas, particularly the cathedral for which he painted an ...

Article

Mónica Martí Cotarelo

Mexican architect, sculptor, painter, lithographer and teacher. He was the leading figure in Puebla in the fields of architecture, sculpture, painting and drawing during the early 19th century. He was director of the Academia de Dibujo in Puebla from its foundation in 1814 and the first recipient of a scholarship from the academy, which allowed him to go to Paris (...

Article

South American, 18th century, male.

Sculptor (wood).

Venice (Mus. della Scuola Grande di San Rocco): War; Peace; Music; Gentleness

Article

Mexican, 18th century, male.

Active during the first half of the 18th century.

Sculptor.

Muñoz sculpted the stalls at the cathedral in Puebla (Mexico).

Article

Eloísa Uribe

Mexican sculptor. He was admitted to the Real Academia de San Carlos at the age of ten. He later studied with Manuel Tolsá, working with him on religious commissions for several churches in Mexico City. Despite this relationship, Patiño Ixtolinque’s religious sculpture remains linked to the more Baroque stylistic forms of the colonial period. By ...

Article

Poblano  

Constantino Reyes-Valerio and Liliana Herrera

Term used to describe an exuberant architectural and sculptural style that developed in and around the city of Puebla, Mexico, in the 18th century. It is characterized by Baroque elements used in combination with ornate stucco, geometrically patterned red brickwork, and polychrome glazed tiles (Sp. ...