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Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1744; died 1818.

Watercolourist, draughtsman, decorative designer, designer of ornamental architectural features. Architectural interiors, architectural views.

London, 25 June 1981: Interior Section of the Temple of the Sun, the Temple of Saturn and the Temple of Priapus (pen and wash...

Article

Flemish School, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Louvain (Brabant).

Died 1819.

Painter, decorative designer. Architectural views. Ornaments.

Berges' work included views of convents and monasteries in Louvain, but these have been lost since 1789.

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Ferrara.

Born 1749, in Ferrara; died 1823.

Painter, decorative designer, engraver, architect.

A pupil of Ghedini, Luigi Bertelli painted frescoes and an oil entitled Demon in the Flames for the Chiesa Nuova; he also made etchings for Arrivo...

Article

N. A. Yevsina

(b Florence, 1745; d Dresden, May 17, 1820).

Italian architect, interior designer and decorative painter. He studied in Rome under Stefano Pozzi from 1766 to 1768 and then in Paris. On his return to Italy he studied antiquities, copying frescoes (with Franciszek Smuglewicz) and measuring and sketching the Baths of Titus (1774) and the villa of Pliny the younger at Laurentinum. He occasionally worked in Poland, where he showed his skill as an interior decorator. A designer of painted arabesque decoration, he combined classical architectural and landscape compositions with Baroque decorative effects. Notable examples include works at the palace of Izabella Poniatowska-Branicka and the royal palace in Warsaw, the Czartoryski Palace (the Pheasantry) at Natolin, and other great houses in Poland.

In late 1783 or early 1784 he was invited to St Petersburg by the heir to the Russian throne, Paul Petrovich (later Tsar Paul I, reg 1796–1801) for the building of his country residence at ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 4 May 1757, in Nantes; died 6 July 1817, in Paris.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver, architect. Mythological subjects, figures, genre scenes, landscapes, landscapes with figures, urban views, architectural views. Wall decorations.

Béguyer de Chancourtois entered the École de l'Académie Royale as a pupil of Jollain and the younger Peyre on ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b c. 1745; d 1835).

English architect and designer. In 1765 he published 12 engravings of designs for ornamental ceilings, and the following year he published a set of drawings (by himself and some contemporaries) called The chimney-piece-maker’s daily assistant: or, a treasury of new designs for chimney-pieces. In 1770 he collaborated with a joiner to produce ...

Article

Flemish School, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 31 May 1765, in Liège; died 22 September 1823, in Liège.

Architect, decorative artist.

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1748, in Dresden; died 1819, in Riga.

Painter, decorative designer. Landscapes, architectural views.

In 1786, 1789 and 1791, Fechelm featured in the exhibition of the academy in Berlin, gaining membership with his Views of Berlin (in oil). In 1790...

Article

David Prout

In 

Article

Gérard Rousset-Charny

(b St Ouen, nr Paris, June 7, 1737; d Paris, Dec 29, 1818).

French architect and designer. He was the son of the gardener at the royal château of Choisy-le-Roi and attended Jacques-François Blondel’s school of architecture, the Ecole des Arts, winning third place in the Prix de Rome competition of 1759. He spent five years in Rome (1761–6) on a bursary granted by Louis XV, and he made friends there with Giovanni Battista Piranesi. He returned to France via Holland and England. In 1769, at the suggestion of the King’s surgeon Germain Pichault de la Martinière, he was commissioned to design the new Ecole de Chirurgie (1771–86; now the Faculté de Médecine, Paris). The layout is in the manner of an hôtel particulier, with a court surrounded by an Ionic colonnade and closed off from the present Rue de l’Ecole de Médecine by a columnar screen. It was this feature that made a great impression on Gondoin’s contemporaries, lacking as it does the usual inflections by projecting end pavilions and central ...

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 25 March 1751, in Longarone (Veneto); died 1831, in St Petersburg.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman (including ink), architect. Landscapes, architectural views, interiors. Theatre decoration, stage sets.

Pietro di Gottardo Gonzaga was the son of Gottardo Gonzaga. He worked as an architect in St Petersburg ...

Article

Article

Sarah Medlam

(b Paris, Oct 9, 1795; d Paris, 1872).

French cabinetmaker. He was the son of Charles-Joseph Lemarchand (1759–1826), a cabinetmaker of repute in Paris during the Empire period. He first studied architecture but in 1813 entered the military academy at Saint Cyr. He was a strong supporter of Napoleon and was later awarded the Légion d’honneur. After the Battle of Waterloo (1815) he returned to Paris to take over his father’s firm. In 1846 he entered into a partnership with André Lemoyne and retired in 1852, although the firm continued under Lemoyne until 1893. Lemarchand became official cabinetmaker to both Charles X and Louis-Philippe, supplying furniture for at least five royal palaces. Furniture from these commissions includes bookcases in Boulle marquetry (Versailles, Château) and two consoles (1838; Versailles, Grand Trianon). He showed his wares at the Exposition des Produits de l’Industrie of 1844 in Paris but in general he seems to have shunned this method of publicity and to have dealt successfully with a large private clientele. He continued to produce his furniture in the Empire style, a taste that clearly accorded with his political preferences. The craftsmanship of his work remained high and dating can be difficult, although after ...

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1739, in Concorezzo, near Milan; died 1828, in Milan.

Architect, architectural draughtsman, painter, decorative designer.

Levati worked initially with a decorator, then, after studying the works of the masters, in particular those of Barbaro and Zanotti, established himself as a painter. He used perspective to decorate a number of palaces and buildings in the city, and in ...

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1749, in Dresden; died 1815, in Dresden.

Enameller, engraver (burin), print publisher.

Morasch engraved notably architectural views, perspectives and sketches of folk costumes.

Article

Portuguese, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born c. 1754, in Benavente; died 1814, in Lisbon.

Painter. Architectural views. Decorative schemes.

Article

Maria Helena Mendes Pinto

(b Campanhã, Oporto province, 1743; d Oporto, 1824).

Portuguese draughtsman, cabinetmaker and architect. The Van Zeller Collection of drawings by Paiva (Lisbon, Mus. N. A. Ant.) records his activity, particularly in the first phase of his career as a joiner and cabinetmaker, a craft in which he also acted as adjudicator and examiner in 1783–4. It is evident from these designs that the scale of his activity extended beyond Oporto to Braga and Arcos de Valdevez. His drawings for both religious and secular furniture are varied and reveal the gradual infiltration of French Neo-classicism and English designs propagated by the pattern books of Sheraton and Hepplewhite; the cabinetmakers of Oporto gave a distinctive northern Portuguese imprint to both lines of influence. The series of designs for domestic furniture, dating between 1780 and 1814, illustrate the taste of his clients, among whom the British colony was strongly represented. The works that can most easily be attributed to him are found in churches, for example a sacristy chest (...

Article

David Prout

English family of artists. John Papworth (1750–99) was the leading stuccoist of his day and was employed frequently by the Office of Works in the time of Sir William Chambers. John’s eldest son, Thomas Papworth (1773–1814), carried on his father’s business, conducting the last major stucco and plastering works in London. John Papworth’s second son, (1) J. B. Papworth, trained as an architect, as did his youngest son, (2) George Papworth. Thomas’s son, Edgar George Papworth (1809–66), became a popular and successful sculptor. George’s son, John Thomas Papworth (1809–42), also practised as an architect in Dublin. Two of John Thomas’s sons, Collins Edgar Papworth (d 1862) and William Papworth, also became architects. J. B. Papworth’s eldest son, John Woody Papworth (1820–70), also became an architect, but he is best known as an antiquary, the author of the standard work ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 25 October 1745, in Besançon; died 1 August 1819, in Besançon.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman, decorative designer, engraver (burin), architect. Landscapes with figures, architectural views.

Pierre Paris was the pupil of Trouard and also of his father who was responsible for the care of the buildings of the bishop of Basel. The king awarded him a place at the École de France in Rome in ...

Article

Portuguese, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born c. 1770, in Lisbon, of Italian origin; died after 1823.

Painter, architect. Decorative schemes.

Manuel Piolti worked for the studio of G. Azzolini at the Ajuda palace.