1-2 of 2 results  for:

  • Architecture and Urban Planning x
  • Eighteenth-Century Art x
  • Nineteenth-Century Art x
  • Interior Design and Furniture x
  • Twentieth-Century Art x
Clear all

Article

Gordon Campbell

German family of furniture-makers, active in Munich. Matthaeus Pössenbacher (fl 1770s) carved furniture for the architect François de Cuvilliés. His grandson Joseph Pössenbacher (1799–1873) founded the furniture factory that supplied the Bavarian court. Joseph’s son Anton Pössenbacher (1842–1920) became cabinetmaker to the Bavarian court, and supplied lavishly upholstered furniture in the style known as German Historicism for the residences of King Ludwig II of Bavaria (...

Article

József Sisa

(b Biala, Galicia [now Bialsko-Biala, Poland], Oct 14, 1846; d Budapest, July 11, 1915).

Hungarian architect, painter and interior designer of German descent. He studied in Karlsruhe and Vienna, and in 1868 he went to Budapest where he worked first in the offices of Antal Szkalnitzky and Miklós Ybl. His designs included the sepulchral monument (1871–2) of Count Lajos Batthyány in the Kerepesi cemetery, Budapest, and other monuments and pedestals for statues. In 1894 he entered into partnership with Fülöp Herzog (1860–1925), with whom he designed the neo-classical architectural ensemble of Heroes’ Square, which terminates the 2.5 km long Radial Avenue (Sugár út, now Andrássy út). In the middle stands the Millenary Monument (1894–1900), a semicircular double colonnade with bronze figures of Hungarian sovereigns and a single, tall Corinthian column with sculpture by György Zala, which commemorates the 1000th anniversary of the Magyar conquest. On opposite sides of the square they built the Art Hall (1895–6), a porticoed red-brick structure with multicoloured terracotta decoration, and the ...