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Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1744; died 1818.

Watercolourist, draughtsman, decorative designer, designer of ornamental architectural features. Architectural interiors, architectural views.

London, 25 June 1981: Interior Section of the Temple of the Sun, the Temple of Saturn and the Temple of Priapus (pen and wash...

Article

Flemish School, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Louvain (Brabant).

Died 1819.

Painter, decorative designer. Architectural views. Ornaments.

Berges' work included views of convents and monasteries in Louvain, but these have been lost since 1789.

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Ferrara.

Born 1749, in Ferrara; died 1823.

Painter, decorative designer, engraver, architect.

A pupil of Ghedini, Luigi Bertelli painted frescoes and an oil entitled Demon in the Flames for the Chiesa Nuova; he also made etchings for Arrivo...

Article

N. A. Yevsina

(b Florence, 1745; d Dresden, May 17, 1820).

Italian architect, interior designer and decorative painter. He studied in Rome under Stefano Pozzi from 1766 to 1768 and then in Paris. On his return to Italy he studied antiquities, copying frescoes (with Franciszek Smuglewicz) and measuring and sketching the Baths of Titus (1774) and the villa of Pliny the younger at Laurentinum. He occasionally worked in Poland, where he showed his skill as an interior decorator. A designer of painted arabesque decoration, he combined classical architectural and landscape compositions with Baroque decorative effects. Notable examples include works at the palace of Izabella Poniatowska-Branicka and the royal palace in Warsaw, the Czartoryski Palace (the Pheasantry) at Natolin, and other great houses in Poland.

In late 1783 or early 1784 he was invited to St Petersburg by the heir to the Russian throne, Paul Petrovich (later Tsar Paul I, reg 1796–1801) for the building of his country residence at ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 4 May 1757, in Nantes; died 6 July 1817, in Paris.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver, architect. Mythological subjects, figures, genre scenes, landscapes, landscapes with figures, urban views, architectural views. Wall decorations.

Béguyer de Chancourtois entered the École de l'Académie Royale as a pupil of Jollain and the younger Peyre on ...

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1748, in Dresden; died 1819, in Riga.

Painter, decorative designer. Landscapes, architectural views.

In 1786, 1789 and 1791, Fechelm featured in the exhibition of the academy in Berlin, gaining membership with his Views of Berlin (in oil). In 1790...

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 25 March 1751, in Longarone (Veneto); died 1831, in St Petersburg.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman (including ink), architect. Landscapes, architectural views, interiors. Theatre decoration, stage sets.

Pietro di Gottardo Gonzaga was the son of Gottardo Gonzaga. He worked as an architect in St Petersburg ...

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1739, in Concorezzo, near Milan; died 1828, in Milan.

Architect, architectural draughtsman, painter, decorative designer.

Levati worked initially with a decorator, then, after studying the works of the masters, in particular those of Barbaro and Zanotti, established himself as a painter. He used perspective to decorate a number of palaces and buildings in the city, and in ...

Article

Portuguese, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born c. 1754, in Benavente; died 1814, in Lisbon.

Painter. Architectural views. Decorative schemes.

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 25 October 1745, in Besançon; died 1 August 1819, in Besançon.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman, decorative designer, engraver (burin), architect. Landscapes with figures, architectural views.

Pierre Paris was the pupil of Trouard and also of his father who was responsible for the care of the buildings of the bishop of Basel. The king awarded him a place at the École de France in Rome in ...

Article

Portuguese, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born c. 1770, in Lisbon, of Italian origin; died after 1823.

Painter, architect. Decorative schemes.

Manuel Piolti worked for the studio of G. Azzolini at the Ajuda palace.

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1747, in Laino; died 23 January 1828, in Munich.

Painter, architect, decorative designer. Theatre decoration, frescoes.

Giuseppe Quaglio studied under his father Domenico Quaglio the Elder and his uncle Lorenzo Quaglio the Elder. He was a theatre painter in Mannheim and Munich. He was one of the most renowned theatre decorators of his time....

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 18 March 1733, in Piedmont; died 27 April 1819.

Painter, decorative designer. Architectural views, animals, still-lifes (including flowers/fruit/poultry).

Michele Antonio Rapous became a member of the Accademia di San Luca in Turin in 1719. Until 1767 he was in the service of the Duke of Challais, then he was a member of the royal household until ...

Article

Rococo  

Richard John and Ludwig Tavernier

A decorative style of the early to mid-18th century, primarily influencing the ornamental arts in Europe, especially in France, southern Germany and Austria. The character of its formal idiom is marked by asymmetry and naturalism, displaying in particular a fascination with shell-like and watery forms. Further information on the Rococo can be found in this dictionary within the survey articles on the relevant countries.

Richard John

The nature and limits of the Rococo have been the subject of controversy for over a century, and the debate shows little sign of resolution. As recently as 1966, entries in two major reference works, the Penguin Dictionary of Architecture and the Enciclopedia universale dell’arte (EWA), were in complete contradiction, one altogether denying its status as a style, the other claiming that it ‘is not a mere ornamental style, but a style capable of suffusing all spheres of art’. The term Rococo seems to have been first used in the closing years of the 18th century, although it was not acknowledged by the ...

Article

revised by Margaret Barlow

A renewed interest among artists, writers, and collectors between c. 1820 and 1870 in Europe, predominantly in France, in the Rococo style in painting, the decorative arts, architecture, and sculpture. The revival of the Rococo served diverse social needs. As capitalism and middle-class democracy triumphed decisively in politics and the economy, the affluent and well-born put increasing value on the aristocratic culture of the previous century: its arts, manners and costumes, and luxury goods.

Among the earliest artists in the 19th century to appreciate and emulate 18th-century art were Jules-Robert Auguste (1789–1830), R. P. Bonington, Eugène Delacroix, and Paul Huet. For these young artists the Rococo was a celebration of sensual and sexual pleasure and a product of a free and poetic imagination. Looking particularly at the work of Watteau, they sought to reproduce the Rococo capacity for lyrical grace, its sophisticated understanding of colour, and its open, vibrant paint surfaces in their work. These qualities can be seen in such re-creations of 18th-century scenes as Eugène Lami’s ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born c. 1753, in Paris; died 1 October 1820, in Paris.

Draughtsman (including red chalk), watercolourist, engraver. Architectural views. Ornaments, decorative panels.

Sallembier's drawings and ornaments exerted a considerable influence over the style of the period of Louis XVI.

Amsterdam: ...

Article

József Sisa

(b Biala, Galicia [now Bialsko-Biala, Poland], Oct 14, 1846; d Budapest, July 11, 1915).

Hungarian architect, painter and interior designer of German descent. He studied in Karlsruhe and Vienna, and in 1868 he went to Budapest where he worked first in the offices of Antal Szkalnitzky and Miklós Ybl. His designs included the sepulchral monument (1871–2) of Count Lajos Batthyány in the Kerepesi cemetery, Budapest, and other monuments and pedestals for statues. In 1894 he entered into partnership with Fülöp Herzog (1860–1925), with whom he designed the neo-classical architectural ensemble of Heroes’ Square, which terminates the 2.5 km long Radial Avenue (Sugár út, now Andrássy út). In the middle stands the Millenary Monument (1894–1900), a semicircular double colonnade with bronze figures of Hungarian sovereigns and a single, tall Corinthian column with sculpture by György Zala, which commemorates the 1000th anniversary of the Magyar conquest. On opposite sides of the square they built the Art Hall (1895–6), a porticoed red-brick structure with multicoloured terracotta decoration, and the ...

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1768, in Mannheim; died 6 December 1819, in Hamburg.

Painter. Landscapes, architectural views. Decorative schemes.

Hamburg (Mus. für Hamburgische Geschichte): View of Poppenbuttel (watercolour)

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born November 1754, in Verona; died 24 June 1811, in Verona.

Painter, decorative artist, designer of ornamental architectural features.

Svidercoschi was probably a descendant of the Le Gru family. The eldest, Jean or Giovanni, born in Paris about 1620, emigrated to Verona and died there in ...