1-6 of 6 Results  for:

  • Architecture and Urban Planning x
  • Scenography x
  • Interior Design and Furniture x
  • Artist, Architect, or Designer x
  • Performance Art and Dance x
Clear all

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born February 1903, in Tunis; died 24 January 1978, in Aix-en-Provence.

Painter, architect, decorative designer, designer, poster artist. Wall decorations, stage costumes and sets, furniture, advertising art.

Art et Lumière.

Félix Tahar Marie Aublet was the son of the Orientalist painter Albert Aublet. He was brought up both in Neuilly, France, and in a Moorish palace in Tunis, where the family spent six months of the year. His second forename, Tahar, means 'blessed one' in Arabic. In ...

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 1933.

Painter (including gouache), decorative designer. Figures, architectural views, flowers. Stage sets, stage costumes.

Dimitri Bouchêne was among the theatrical designers who followed on from Christian Bérard. His free, light line deliberately recalls classical architecture, though this is more suggested than actually represented and uses harmonious pale tones....

Article

Leland M. Roth and Gordon Campbell

(John)

(b Vienna, Sept 22, 1890; d New York, Dec 27, 1965).

American architect, stage designer, furniture designer and writer of Austrian birth. In 1920 he worked with Adolf Loos in Vienna. He was also in contact with the artists associated with De Stijl and began experimenting with innovative theatre designs. In 1924 he produced the Endless Theatre design. The ‘Endless’ was a double-curved shell of reinforced concrete that could enclose any irregularly traditional divisions into floor, wall, and ceiling but offered the inhabitant an open interior that could be modified at will. For the theatre he adapted the ‘Endless’ by devising a double-spiral stage interconnected by ramps and rings of spectator seats. Kiesler believed that the Endless Theatre, without proscenium or curtain, projecting out into the audience, with perpetually moving walls bathed in light of ever changing colour, would promote greater interaction between actors and audience.

For the celebrated Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes in Paris in 1925...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 1794, in Bordeaux.

Painter, watercolourist, decorative designer. Landscapes, architectural views. Theatre decoration, stage costumes and sets.

Humanité René Philastre joined the École des Beaux-Arts on 9 December 1806. He was one of the decorative artists attached to the Théâtre de l'Opéra and worked on the restoration of the theatre in Brest. Philastre also produced sets for theatres in Lille, Douai, Lyons and Dijon, among others....

Article

Austrian, 18th century, male.

Born 20 September 1751, in Prague; died 4 April 1806, in Vienna.

Painter, watercolourist. Mythological subjects, allegorical subjects, genre scenes, landscapes, architectural views. Wall decorations, stage sets.

Josef was probably the son of the sculptor Ignaz Platzer. He was taught by F. Wolf and had Prince Kaunitz as his patron. In Vienna, he was commissioned by Josef II to decorate the Imperial Theatre. During this demanding undertaking he painted landscapes (mostly moonlit scenes), genre paintings and stage sets. On the arrival of Leopold II, he was appointed court painter, and in ...

Article

Paul Louis Bentel

(b Vienna, 1872; d New York, July 10, 1933).

American architect, stage designer, interior designer and illustrator of Austrian birth. He studied at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna under Karl Hasenauer. Urban first received recognition as an architect in the USA in 1904 when his design for the interior of the Austrian Pavilion at the World’s Fair in St Louis, MO, was awarded a Gold Medal. He subsequently established himself in Europe as a stage designer; in 1911 he emigrated to the USA to assume a position as set designer with the Boston Opera Company.

After the completion of the Ziegfield Theater (1922), New York, Urban solidified his reputation as an architect with unexecuted proposals for several large theatres. For the Metropolitan Opera House, intended as the focal point of the first schemes for the Rockefeller Center (1926–8), he proposed a semi-circular seating arrangement, to which he added galleries that projected from the proscenium into the seating area to break down the separation between audience and stage. In ...