1-10 of 10 results  for:

  • Prints and Printmaking x
  • Publisher or Printer x
  • Religious Art x
  • Christian Art x
Clear all

Article

A. G.  

Italian, 16th century, male.

Monogram of an engraver (including copper), print publisher (?). Religious subjects.

A.G. is mentioned by Brulliot, and believed to have been a pupil of Marcantonio Raimondi. He is known for his Virgin Holding the Infant Jesus, and Crowned by Two Angels...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born 1733, in Caen (Calvados); died 1770.

Engraver, print publisher.

René Charpentier worked in Paris in the Rue de la Harpe. We have his original engraving, Christ on the Cross.

Article

Dutch, 17th century, male.

Active in Delft, from 1614 to 1625.

Engraver, draughtsman, print publisher. Religious subjects.

Brussels, 1797: Four Pieces, including: Abigail Bringing Supplies of Food (drawing in red chalk); The Crown of Thorns (collection) FRF 8

Article

Article

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Born 1640, in Paris.

Engraver (burin), print publisher. Religious subjects.

This artist was the son of François Langlois known as Ciartres, whose business he continued. He engraved religious subjects.

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Draughtsman, engraver (burin), print publisher. Religious subjects, portraits.

Jean Patigny was working in France between 1660 and 1670. It is possible he went to Italy since his work is reminiscent of that of Agostino Carracci. He made portrait engravings and engravings of religious subjects....

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Active in Parisc.1650.

Draughtsman, engraver (etching), print dealer. Religious subjects.

Little is known about Rabasse. He made an engraving representing The Rest on the Flight into Egypt which featured in the exhibition mounted in 2002 at the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Nancy entitled ...

Article

Gode Krämer and Roberto Pontual

German family of painters, draughtsmen, and engravers. (1) Georg Philipp Rugendas I, an esteemed painter and graphic artist in Augsburg, established a print publishing house there in 1735. His sons Georg Philipp Rugendas II (1701–74), Christian Rugendas (1708–81), and Jeremias Gottlob Rugendas (1710–72) helped with this business, as did their descendants, including Georg Philipp II’s grandson, the engraver Johann Lorenz Rugendas II (1775–1826). (2) Johann Moritz Rugendas, the son of Johann Lorenz II, was noted particularly for his drawings and paintings of Brazil and other Latin American countries.

(b Augsburg, Nov 27, 1666; d Augsburg, May 9, 1742).

His father, a watchmaker, trained him in copper engraving, but after a fistula on his right hand forced him to abandon this he was apprenticed (...

Article

Judith K. Golden

Anonymous collection of in-depth typologies, based on the idea that every event in the New Testament was presaged by an event in the Old Testament ( see Typological cycles ). The Speculum humanae salvationis appeared first in manuscript form, then as Block-book s and later as incunabula. Chief among possible sources for the text is Ludolphus of Saxony (c. 1300–77), with Conradus of Altzheim, Vincent of Beauvais, Henricus Suso and Nicholas of Lyra among others also suggested authors. Like copies of the earlier Biblia pauperum, tituli and captions identify events and figures, however the Speculum humanae salvationis augments these pictures with a text that explains the illustrations. Between the early 14th century and the end of the 15th, several hundred copies, nearly all illustrated, were produced and translated from the original Latin into German, French, English, Dutch and Czech.

Typically the manuscripts include a Prologue and Prohemium, of text only; followed by forty-two chapters with four miniatures atop four text columns each of twenty-five lines; closing with three chapters with eight miniatures devoted to the Seven Stations of the Passion, the Seven Sorrows and the Seven Joys of Mary, these last three chapters not being typological. Some manuscripts omit opening texts or the final three chapters. Each opening provides a meditative, typological diptych of four images and clarifying text, for example Christ and the Last Supper as the first image, followed by Moses and the Miracle of Manna; Moses and Passover; Abraham blessed by Melchisedek. The first image contains gospel citations; the last three have captions indicating their relationship to the first....