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David M. Sokol

(b Philadelphia, PA, June 23, 1822; d Claymont, DE, March 27, 1888).

American illustrator and printmaker. After being exposed early to the Neo-classical style of John Flaxman, Darley began his career as an illustrator in Philadelphia in 1842. Following a sketching trip west of the Mississippi during the summer of that year, he produced outline drawings that were adapted into lithographs appearing in Scenes in Indian Life (1843). His early book illustrations were published in periodicals such as Democratic Review and Godey’s Magazine. Working in line drawing, lithography and wood- and steel-engraving, his first major success was his series of illustrations for John Frost’s Pictorial History of the United States (1844).

After moving to New York in 1848, Darley dominated the field of American illustration with his illustrations of Washington Irving and James Fenimore Cooper’s tales and novels. He produced about 500 illustrations for Cooper’s novels and a similar number for Benson J. Lossing’s Our Country (1875–7...

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(b Dresden, Oct 23, 1775; d Dresden, Feb 11, 1842).

German architect and illustrator. He studied architecture and perspective (1791–5) with Gottlob August Hölzer (1744–1814). As little was built in Dresden until the end of the Napoleonic Wars (1803–15), he devoted himself to architectural and landscape drawings, often using them as a basis for engravings and etchings. These included the series of plates Dresden mit seinen Prachtgebäuden und schönsten Umgebungen (Dresden, 1807–8). He was appointed court inspector in 1810, subsequently rebuilding the Fürstenschule in Meissen and designing festive decorations for Napoleon’s entry into Dresden (1812) and the return of the king of Saxony (1815). In 1813 he visited Italy and in the same year supervised the rebuilding of the Marienkirche at Bischofswerda, near Dresden, where he later built the Rathaus (1818), a simple cube with a pyramidal roof. His particular Neo-classical style emerged in his designs of ...