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Article

Algerian, 20th century, male.

Active in France since 1953.

Born 1931, in Mestghanem.

Painter, engraver, illustrator, painter (gouache), watercolourist. Designs for tapestries.

Abdallah Benanteur began his artistic studies at the school of fine art in Oran, completing them at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris. He settled in Paris in 1953. From 1972 to 1976, he taught in the architecture department of the École des Beaux-Arts and at the École des Arts Décoratifs in Paris....

Article

Algerian, 20th century, male.

Born 14 March 1930, in Mostghanem; died 1991.

Painter, watercolourist, illustrator, engraver. Stage sets.

Mohamed Khadda, a self-taught painter, was a communist who wrote the theoretical treatise Component of a New Art ( Élément pour un art nouveau) on Algerian painting. Although Kadda's art has its basis in the abstract, he by no means renounces all contact with nature, which underpins all his landscape paintings. Unexpected signs, inspired by Arab-Berber symbols, invest his canvases with violence and emotion. By trade a typographer, Khadda took great pleasure in devising a form of abstract calligraphy that he constantly renewed. This technique is at its most unashamedly exuberant in his painting ...

Article

Algerian, 20th century, male.

Born 24 June 1896, in Algiers; died 1 April 1975, murdered.

Painter, miniaturist, illustrator. Scenes with figures.

Orientalism.

Mohamed Racim was born to a family of successful engravers. He received early training from his father and at the age of 14 he joined the Cabinet de Dessin de l'Enseignement Professionel in Algiers. In 1917 he won a scholarship from the Casa Valasquez to visit Spain, Paris and London. Here he honed his technique in the manuscripts department of the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris and at the Iranian studies section in London. Having met the celebrated orientalist painter Etienne Dinet in 1914, he was asked to produce the frontispieces for his ...

Article

Algerian, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1947, in Sfizef.

Painter, engraver, illustrator.

Ali Silem studied at the school of fine arts in Algiers. In 1979, he participated in the execution of a collaborative fresco in Algiers and of sets and costumes for theatrical productions. He has exhibited in Algeria in collective events since ...

Article

Blanca García Vega

(b Málaga, Aug 15, 1821; d Madrid, Feb 19, 1882).

Spanish lithographer, illustrator and painter. In 1859 he enlisted for the African Campaign in Morocco, and the studies he did in Africa led to drawings for an atlas of the battles in Africa (Madrid, 1860), as well as those for Crónicas de la guerra de Africa (Madrid, 1859) by Emilio Castelar and for Diario (Madrid, 1859–60) by the novelist Pedro Antonio de Alarcón (1833–91). He promoted a section for lithography at the Escuela de Artes y Oficios in Madrid. An excellent portraitist, he also made numerous drawings and illustrations for newspapers, royal chronicles and for Iconografia española (Madrid, 1855–64) by Valentín Carderera y Solano, as well as lithographs of bullfights. He provided decorative works for various public buildings in Madrid and the provinces.

A. Canovas: Pintores malaqueños del siglo XIX (Málaga, 1908) A. Gallego: Historia del grabado en España (Madrid, 1979), p. 356 E. Paez Rios...

Article

Esmé Berman

( Willem Frederick )

(b The Hague, Sept 9, 1873; d Pretoria, Jan 24, 1921).

South African painter and printmaker of Dutch birth. He was a self-taught artist and left Holland in 1905 to take up employment in the Pretoria branch of a Dutch bookselling firm. He painted and etched landscapes and still-lifes during weekends only until 1916, when a group of patrons made it possible for him to spend three months painting full-time in Cape Town. He found the misty winter climate of the Cape peninsula, being closer to the atmosphere of his homeland than the harsh, sunlit expanses of the Transvaal, suited to his temperament and style. During that and later visits he produced enough saleable work to repay his benefactors and to continue painting full-time. Unfortunately his practice of working incessantly outdoors, regardless of inclement weather, also undermined the fragile health that had originally driven him from Holland.

Although Wenning revelled in the wooded landscapes of the Cape, he eschewed the picture-postcard sentimentality typical of the work of most of his contemporaries. His formats are small, but the flat colour planes and decorative, rhythmical contours—both especially pronounced in his still-life studies—are brisk and confident, as in ...