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American photographer. Self-taught, Abbe started to produce photographs at the age of 12. From 1898 to 1910 he worked in his father’s bookshop and then worked as a reporter for the Washington Post, travelling to Europe in 1910. Having earlier produced photographs of ships and sailors for tourist cards, from ...

Article

Spanish, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in France.

Born 2 May 1851, in Murcia; died 27 July 1913, in Paris.

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, draughtsman (including charcoal), illustrator, photographer. Figures, genre scenes, street scenes, local scenes (bullfighting), interiors with figures, horses.

Enrique Atalaya Gonzales was a pupil of German Hernandez Amores. He settled in Paris in 1886 and later became a naturalised French citizen. He was a popular genre painter, but he also worked as an illustrator for Parisian publishing houses, providing illustrations for the works of Cervantes, among others. He was a brilliant painter of typical Spanish scenes, such as bullfights, inn scenes and wild horses....

Article

Norwegian, 19th century, male.

Born 13 April 1823, in Oslo; died 1 May 1906, in Oslo.

Painter, illustrator, photographer. Historical subjects, military portraits, equestrian portraits. Decorative schemes.

Balling studied decorative painting at the royal school of art in Oslo, after which he spent some time in Copenhagen and Bremen before studying for two years at the Berlin academy. He returned to Oslo in ...

Article

Bertall  

French, 19th century, male.

Born 18 December 1820, in Paris; died 24 March 1883, in Soyons (Ardèche).

Draughtsman, engraver (wood), lithographer, illustrator, photographer.

Albert d'Arnoux elected to paint under this pseudonym at the suggestion of Honoré de Balzac. He emerged as one of the most prolific illustrators of the second half of the 19th century but, although his drawings are amusing, they lack any distinctive personality. He was chosen by the publishing house Barba to illustrate popular editions of the works of Fenimore Cooper, Paul de Kock, Pigault-Lebrun and others, and is reputed to have engraved some 3,600 plates for Barba alone. Bertall also furnished numerous comic illustrations for magazines such as ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in the United States.

Born 7 January 1830 , in Solingen, near Düsseldorf; died 18 February 1902 , in New York.

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, draughtsman, illustrator, photographer. Figures, local figures, landscapes with figures, landscapes, waterscapes, mountainscapes, urban landscapes, seascapes, animals, insects...

Article

Leslie Williams

English mathematician, writer and photographer. Well-known as the author of children’s books with a logical philosophical undercurrent, he was active as an amateur photographer, using wet collodion plates, from May 1856 to July 1880, according to his diary. His portraits of Victorian luminaries include Dante Gabriel Rossetti...

Article

Ismeth Raheem

English photographer, publisher and writer. He first travelled to Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) as private secretary to the Bishop of Colombo. In 1870 he set up a small bookshop in Colombo, which by 1884 had diversified into a flourishing publishing house, H. W. Cave & Company, and a printing firm equipped to produce books with excellent quality photographic reproductions. He took a serious interest in photography, and this enabled him to illustrate the pictorial travelogues written by him and published by his own firm. His close supervision of the details of book production and photographic reproduction gave him a competitive edge over other commercial photographers. He returned to England in ...

Article

Russian, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1968, in Abramtsevo, Russia.

Book illustrator, draftsman, sculptor, video artist.

Fairy-tale illustrations, cityscapes, portraits.

Kirill Chelushkin graduated from the Moscow Institute of Architecture in 1994. In the late 1990s, he met the artist and theorist Dmitry Gutov, founder of the Livchitz Institute. The Institute reinterpreted the thinking of the Soviet art historian Michael Livchitz, who was a promoter of the aesthetic principles of Socialist Realism in opposition to Formalism and Modernism. This perspective contributed to reinforce Chelushkin’s figurative approach towards the surrounding reality....

Article

Silvia Lucchesi

Italian painter, photographer, architect and illustrator. He trained initially as a musician and only later became a painter, studying (1872–8) at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Bologna under the history and portrait painter Antonio Puccinelli (1822–97). He made several short trips to Paris and London before moving to Rome where he became friends with Vincenzo Cabianca (...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 6 April 1857, in Ipswich (Massachusetts); died 13 December 1922, in New York.

Painter, engraver (wood), draughtsman, designer, illustrator, potter, photographer. Landscapes.

Arthur Wesley Dow studied in Worcester with the painter Anna K. Freeland, then in Boston in the studio of the painter James M. Stone. In 1884 he travelled to Paris, where he was a pupil of Boulanger and of Lefebvre at the Académie Julian. On returning to Boston in 1889, he studied Aztec, Oceanian, African, Egyptian and, above all, Japanese art. In 1893 he became assistant curator of Japanese art at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. In the 1890s Dow became an avid photographer and made photographs as studies and as works of art. The majority of his photographs are of the landscape around Ipswich and botanical subjects. He printed most often in cyanotype, which renders the image in bright shades of blue and reveals Dow’s interest in tonality. For example, Dory (1904) explores the transitions between low-lying marsh grass and still water in an arrangement inspired by the Japanese woodblock prints he admired....

Article

Mary Christian

English photographer and writer. He took up photography in the early 1880s out of his interest in the ‘study of the beautiful’ while a bookseller in London. In 1887 he received a medal from the Royal Photographic Society for his microscopic photographs of shells, which to his dismay were categorized as scientific photographs. In ...

Article

Julius Kaplan

Belgian painter, illustrator, sculptor, designer, photographer and writer. He was one of the foremost Symbolist artists and active supporters of avant-garde art in late 19th-century Belgium. His wealthy family lived in Bruges from 1859 to 1864, moved to Brussels in 1865, where Khnopff remained until his death, and spent their summers at a country home in Fosset, in the Ardennes. Fosset inspired numerous landscapes that owe a strong debt to Barbizon-style realism (see ...

Article

Christoph Brockhaus

Austrian draughtsman, illustrator, painter and writer. In 1892 he was apprenticed in Klagenfurt to the landscape photographer Alois Beer. Though learning very little, he remained there until 1896, when he attempted to commit suicide as a result of his unstable disposition. A brief period in the Austrian army in ...

Article

Polish, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in Germany.

Born 23 May 1874, in Drohobycz (Galicia, Ukraine); died 17 June 1925, in Brunswick.

Painter, engraver (etching), illustrator, book designer, photographer. Religious subjects, scenes with figures, landscapes with figures.

Ephraïm Lilien was apprenticed to a sign painter before studying at the school of fine art, Cracow, under the painter Matejko from 1890 to 1892, after which he returned to his home town to work as a commercial painter. Lacking the means to enroll at the Vienna Academy, in 1899 he settled in Berlin, where he became friends with Börries von Münchhausen. With other figures from the Zionist Congress of 1901 he founded the publishing house Jüdischer Verlag in 1902, publishing a great many works of art and literature on the Jewish Renaissance. Also in 1902 he published the ...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 1816, in Paris; died c. 1878.

Draughtsman, lithographer, illustrator, photographer. Historical subjects, landscapes. Vignettes.

Marville was fortunately rediscovered as a result of his work as a photographer, but he also produced a significant body of graphic work. Collective thematic exhibitions: ...

Article

Marie de Thézy

French photographer and illustrator. He first worked as an illustrator in the medium of wood-engraving and was associated with Tony Johannot. With the writer Charles Nodier (1780–1844) and publishers such as Curmer and Bourdin he took part in the creation of great Romantic illustrated editions of such works as ...

Article

German, 19th century, male.

Active and naturalised in USA from 1849.

Born 13 October 1818, in Kassel; died 1 March 1878, in San Francisco.

Painter, engraver, lithographer, illustrator, photographer. Portraits, animals, genre scenes, landscapes, historical subjects.

Charles Nahl, the son and grandson of artists, was proficient in watercolour by age 12. He studied at the Kassel Academy, exhibiting his work in Berlin, Dresden and Paris. In ...

Article

British, 19th – 20th century, female.

Born 28 July 1866, in South Kensington (London); died 22 December 1943, in Sawrey (Cumbria).

Illustrator.

Beatrix Potter was the daughter of Rupert Potter, a renowned amateur photographer. Her family mixed with artists, including John Everett Millais. She taught herself illustration. In ...

Article

Kelly Holohan and Donna Halper

American illustrator and poster designer. Her father Edgar was a photographer who had studios in Newburyport and Franklin, MA. Ethel seemed to have been influenced by her mother, Mary Elizabeth. She told The Bookman in late 1895 that she and her mother planned to go to Paris together so she could study there. They later went to Ireland and England. Reed was mainly self-taught, but she did study briefly at the Cowles School of Art in Boston and took drawing lessons with the noted miniature painter Laura Coombs Hills (...

Article

Mary Christian

English photographer. As a young man he worked in a bookshop while studying art. He became interested in photography at the Great Exhibition, London (1851), and photographed landscapes and architecture in Shropshire and Warwickshire. In 1857 he opened a portrait studio in Leamington Spa and became interested in the composite photographs of O. G. Rejlander. Robinson, too, began to compose his photographs from a number of separate negatives in an attempt to elevate photography to the status of painting in the academies. The process was known as combination printing (...