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Article

Canadian, 19th century, male.

Born 2 November 1828, in St Andrews (New Brunswick); died 9 January 1901, in Providence (Rhode Island).

Painter, draughtsman, watercolourist, engraver, photographer. Portraits, religious subjects, genre scenes, landscapes, seascapes, still-lifes.

Bannister's father was form Barbados and his mother was Scottish. He was born in Canada right after slavery was abolished. He went to live in New York were he was a sailor and settled in Boston in ...

Article

African American, 19th century, male.

Active in the United Kingdom and Canada.

Born 1821, in Seneca County (New York), or 1822 according to some sources; died 21 December 1872, in Detroit (Michigan).

Painter, watercolourist, photographer. Figures, portraits, genre scenes, landscapes, urban townscapes, still-lifes, mural compositions. Hudson River School...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1882, in Charleston; died 5 May 1931, in Charleston.

Painter, photographer. Figures, portraits, landscapes, still-lifes (flowers). Murals.

Edwin Augustus Harleston studied at Atlanta University, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts School (1906-1912) and Harvard University. He opened a photography studio with his wife, Elise, in Charleston. In ...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Active in the USA.

Born 1810, in Paris; died 9 January 1866, in New Orleans (Louisiana), USA.

Lithographer, painter, photographer. Portraits, city scenes, landscapes.

Jules Lion exhibited lithographs at the Paris Salon from 1831 to 1836. He arrived in New Orleans in ...

Article

Geoffrey Belknap

(b Paris, c. 1816; d New Orleans, LA, Jan 9, 1866).

African American lithographer, daguerreotypist, and painter of French birth. Lion was born in Paris and trained as an artist in France before moving to the United States in 1837. He is noted as the first African American to adopt the daguerreotype method, and one of the first daguerreotypists active in the United States. For much of his life, Lion resided in New Orleans and operated his photographic studios in the city. He was active as a photographer for a relatively short period of time—between 1840 and 1845—and because of this only a small number of his views of New Orleans streets remain, primarily in the form of lithographic prints made from daguerreotypes (now presumed lost). In addition to making his lithographic copies, Lion gained notoriety in New Orleans for offering lectures and exhibitions of the daguerreotype process following the announcement of its invention. After leaving photography behind in 1845...