1-20 of 34 results  for:

  • Painting and Drawing x
  • Sculpture and Carving x
  • Twentieth-Century Art x
  • Native American Art x
Clear all

Article

Canadian First Nations (Inuit), 20th century, female.

Born 1927, in South Ikerasak/Ikerrasak (Baffin Island). Died January 2013.

Sculptor (stone/plaster), engraver, lithographer, watercolourist, draughtsman. Birds and animals.

Kenojuak Ashevak produced some of the most widely recognized and appreciated Inuit art of her generation and due to her success was able to transcend her role as an artist to hold an iconic status within Canadian national consciousness. She began stone-cutting in the 1950s but soon became better known for her skills in drawing and printmaking. Two of her prints were selected to appear on Canadian postage stamps. With several other Cape Dorset Inuit and with the guidance of James Houston, an early promoter of Inuit art, she formed the West Baffin Cooperative Print Studio in ...

Article

Canadian First Nations (We Wai Kai/Cape Mudge Band), 21st century, male.

Born 1975, in Richmond (British Columbia).

Painter, sculptor, printmaker, photographer.

The aesthetic of Sonny Assu (Liǥwilda’x̱w/Laich-kwil-tach) is a confluence of Northwest Coast formline motifs and popular Western culture. He is well versed in the traditional Kwakwaka’wakw arts of drum, blanket and basket making and uses these as the starting place of many of his artworks. Drawing on a pop sensibility, mass-media culture is used as a conduit to explore and expose these Kwakwaka’wakw traditions as well as the artist’s own mixed heritage. By bringing these seemingly desperate elements together, Assu’s works challenge popular notions of authenticity regarding Indigenous people and their art. Moreover, while the works may appear whimsical at first glance, they offer a sharp critique of Western society’s culture of consumption as it relates to colonisation, both historical and ongoing, in North America....

Article

Native American (Wiyot and Yurok), 20th–21st century, male.

Born 1946, in Newport (Oregon).

Sculptor, painter, ceramicist, mixed-media artist, print-maker.

Rick Bartow of the Wiyot and Yurok Nations of Northern California works in a number of media to create images which often reference indigenous North American transformation myths. His work with the Maori artist John Bevan Ford has also been an influence. In ...

Article

American and Native American (Cherokee), 20th century, male.

Active in Germany.

Born 1940, in Arkansas.

Sculptor, sculptor of assemblages, collage artist, installation artist, draughtsman, essayist, and poet.

Jimmie Durham is a critically acclaimed international Native American artist of Cherokee descent whose works often combine humour, found objects, and references to the historical past in sculptural installations that challenge the reigning perceptions of American Indian peoples and their histories. His distinguished career includes participation in five separate Venice Biennales, and examples of his work have been shown widely in Europe and across the globe. He began working as a sculptor in ...

Article

W. Jackson Rushing III

(b Sacramento, CA, Jan 5, 1946; d Santa Fe, NM, Dec 28, 2006).

Native American painter, printmaker and sculptor of Maidu, Hawaiian and Portuguese ancestry. Raised in Northern California, Fonseca studied at Sacramento City College and at California State University at Sacramento with Wintu artist Frank LaPena (b 1937). A leading figure in the national network of contemporary native artists that formed in the early to mid-1970s, Fonseca received the Best of Show Award in the Indian Art Now exhibition at the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, Sante Fe, NM, in 1979. Many honors followed, including the Allan Houser Memorial Award and an Eiteljorg Museum Fellowship for Native American Fine Art, both in 2005. Inspired by mythology, pictography and modernism, he explored oral history, media imagery and popular culture through figuration and abstraction.

Fonseca’s earliest imagery transformed indigenous designs and material culture. His Maidu Creation Story (1977) was the first of several treatments (1991, 2006) of subject matter based on the teachings of his uncle, Henry Azbill. The quiet, folkish elegance and pristine primitivism of his drawings for the anthology ...

Article

Native American (Diné/Navajo), 20st century, male.

Born 1932, in Chinle (Arizona); died 2005, in Albuquerque.

Painter, sculptor, lithographer.

Navajo painter and sculptor R. C. Gorman was one of Native North America’s most influential artists of the 20th century. Owing his great commercial success to a deceptively simple style, Gorman was among those who marked through their art the transition between the so-called ‘Traditional painting’ and the generation of ‘New Indian Painters’. Deeply influencing numerous indigenous and Euro-American artists alike, Gorman contributed to the popularisation of Southwestern motifs, themes and aesthetics, establishing a clearly identifiable genre that makes economic use of lines and volumes....

Article

Arthur Silberman

(b Chinle, AZ, July 26, 1932).

Native American Navajo painter, printmaker and sculptor. After attending Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, where he majored in literature and minored in art, he received a scholarship in 1958 from the Navajo Tribal Council to study art at Mexico City College. He also studied at San Francisco State University and at other California institutions. The style that he developed stemmed from his experiences in Mexico and reveals the influence of his teachers as well as that of the Mexican muralists. He maintained a studio and gallery for his own works and those of other Native American artists in Taos, NM. While Gorman has handled such subject-matter as interpretations of Navajo rugs and pottery designs, his most successful and best-received works have been his studies of Navajo women. He portrayed them as archetypes; as monumental, nurturing ‘earth mothers’. He grouped women in conventional poses or engaged in domestic pursuits, ranging from stolid affirmations to revelations of inner beauty and grace. He used various media, sometimes painting and drawing in acrylics, pastels and pencil in the same work. He worked out personal technical processes and used these with great effectiveness. His style is well-suited to lithographs, which he has produced in great number. He has also produced sculptures....

Article

Native American (Eastern Band of Cherokee), 20th–21st century, female.

Born 1957, in Baltimore.

Multimedia artist, photographer, illustrator, basket-weaver with paper.

Shan Goshorn, given the Cherokee Wolf Clan name of Yellow Moon, began training in silversmithing at the Cleveland Institute of Art and transferred to the Atlanta College of Art for her final year, receiving a BFA degree in painting and photography (double major) in ...

Article

Native American (Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache), 20th–21st century, male.

Born 1 April 1943, in Los Angeles.

Sculptor, painter, printmaker, jewellery maker.

The Chiricahua Apache artist Bob Haozous, son of the well-known Apache sculptor Allan Houser (Haozous is the indigenous name which became Houser when anglicised), is a noted figure in his own right, having the distinction of contributing work to two Venice Biennales (...

Article

Native American (Cheyenne and Arapaho), 20th–21st century, male.

Born 22 November, 1954, in Wichita (Kansas).

Painter, draughtsman, sculptor, printmaker, installation artist, conceptual artist, educator.

Edgar Heap of Birds is one of the most distinguished North American indigenous artists of his generation. His works reveal a distinctly critical and historical awareness of the ways that American Indian peoples, their histories and their viewpoints have been ignored and written over under colonialism. He has received numerous honours, presenting his work in competition for the United States Pavilion at the 52nd Venice Biennale (...

Article

Frederick J. Dockstader

[Cheah Sequah: ‘Red Bird’]

(b Muskogee, OK, Dec 19, 1930).

Native American Creek–Cherokee painter and sculptor. Her father, William McKinley Hill, and mother, Winnie Dixie Harris, were both Creek–Cherokee. She attended elementary and high school, then Muskogee College for an AA degree, and Northeastern College for a BA (1952). She studied under various artists, including Richard West at Bacone College, Frederic Taubes (1900–82), Millard Sheets (1907–89) and Dong Kingman. Much of her later painting reflects this training. Her family included George Washington Hill, Chief of the Creek Nation, 1925–8, a background giving her work unusual fidelity. She taught briefly, but retired to paint full-time in Muskogee. She is one of the few Native American women artists to achieve success and has been a strong influence on younger women. She has been the recipient of many awards and prizes for works in almost every medium, including sculpture and collage. As a teacher she has provided a strong influence for her students and devotes considerable time to younger artists. For a decade, ...

Article

G. Lola Worthington

(b Buffalo, NY, 1950).

Tuscarora artist, writer, educator, and museum director. Hill studied at the Art Institute of Chicago (1968–70), and was awarded a Master of Arts degree from SUNY, Buffalo, NY (1980).

Intrigued with Seneca General Ely Parker (General Grant’s Military Secretary), Hill investigated Parker’s life, which took him to Washington, DC, for two years. Hill began to identify with Parker’s experience and realized he would devote himself to enlightening others about Native American arts, knowledge, education, and culture.

Hill was skilled in painting, photography, carving, beading, and basket weaving, and many of these works are located at the Canadian Museum of Civilizations, Quebec; the Woodland Indian Cultural Center, Brantford, Ontario; the Cleveland Museum of Art; the Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa, OK; the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Washington, DC; and the Seneca Iroquois National Museum, Salamanca, NY. He taught at McMaster University, Mohawk College, Six Nations Polytechnic, and SUNY at Buffalo. Hill developed a culturally based Seneca Language curriculum and training models for teaching....

Article

Native American (Aleut), 20th century, male.

Born 13 October 1919, in Cordova (Alaska); died 3 September 2011, in Puget Sound (Washington).

Painter, carver, sculptor.

John Hoover left his hometown of Cordova in 1952, moving first to Edmonds and then to Grapeview, Washington. From 1975 to ...

Article

Canadian First Nations (Saulteaux-Ojibwa), 20th-21st century, male.

Born 9 March 1947, in St. Boniface (Winnipeg).

Painter, sculptor, multimedia and installation artist.

A member of Sandy Bay First Nation, Robert Houle is a Canadian Saulteaux-Ojibwa artist, writer and curator, as well as a survivor of the Sandy Bay Indian Residential School. He received a BA in Art History from University of Manitoba in ...

Article

Arthur Silberman

[Ha-o-zous]

(b Apache, OK, June 30, 1914; d Santa Fe, NM, Aug 22, 1994).

Native American painter and sculptor. He was the son of a Chiricahua Apache (originally from Colorado and New Mexico) family who settled in Oklahoma after release from captivity at Fort Sill in 1913. As a young boy he received a full education in Chiricahua Apache customs. He later attended the Santa Fe Indian School and studied painting with Dorothy Dunn (1903–91). In 1936 he received the Arts and Crafts Award for the best work produced by a student. After graduation, he gained additional experience in oil, casein, and egg tempera painting and in fresco and secco mural techniques. His early paintings were scenes of Apache ceremonial and social life in the flat, controlled style of the Santa Fe Indian School, which also revealed his skill as a draughtsman. He painted a number of murals, including the extant series illustrating Apache dancers and people on horseback for the Department of the Interior Building in Washington, DC (...

Article

American and Native American, 20th century, male.

Born 30 June 1914, near Apache (Oklahoma); died 22 August 1994, in Santa Fe (New Mexico).

Sculptor (bronze/wood/stone), painter. Figures, Native American subjects. Murals.

Native Art.

Allan C. Houser, a Chiracahua Apache, grew up in the farming and ranching area near Apache, Oklahoma. He was much influenced by his parents, who spoke Apache and sang traditional Native songs. He was particularly influenced by his father, Sam Haozous, who had previously been imprisoned for 27 years for his part in the 1886 Chiracahua uprising, and who had been a translator for the famous chief Geronimo. Houser studied painting at the Santa Fe Indian School under Dorothy Dunn starting in 1934, receiving the Arts and Crafts Award in 1936 for the best work by a student; later he studied with Olle Nordmark, a Norwegian muralist, at Fort Sill Indian School in Oklahoma. It was Nordmark who encouraged him to start work in sculpture. Houser was artist in residence at the Inter-Mountain Indian School, Brigham City, Utah (1951–1962). He taught at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe from 1962, becoming head of the sculpture department from 1971 until 1975, when he retired to concentrate on his sculpting work....

Article

Margaret Moore Booker

(b Hermiston, OR, 1946).

Native American sculptor and painter. A master sculptor of monumental and smaller works, Hyde’s work reflects his Native American ancestry (Nez Perce, Assiniboine and Chippewa). After spending much of his childhood on the Nez Perce Reservation in Idaho, Hyde attended the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) high school arts program in Santa Fe, NM, where he studied with jeweler Charles Loloma (1921–91), ceramic instructor Ottilie Loloma and famed Chiricahua sculptor Allan Houser (1914–94). Following graduation in 1966, he attended the San Francisco Art Institute (1969–71) on a scholarship and then enlisted in the US Army (1968–9). He was wounded during a tour of duty in Vietnam and while recuperating learned to work stone with power tools in a friend’s tombstone business in Lewiston, ID.

He returned to Santa Fe to teach at IAIA (1971–4) and began his career in sculpture. In his first solo show, at the Museum of the Plains Indians in Browning, MT, in ...

Article

Native American (Cherokee), 20th–21st century, male.

Born in Oklahoma.

Ceramicist, sculptor.

A member of the Cherokee Nation, Troy Jackson is a noted potter and sculptor in clay who is also a native Oklahoman. He received his Associate of Arts from Bacone College in Muskogee (where he now teaches as an Adjunct Professor of Art) and his Bachelor of Arts from Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. He later completed the MFA programme at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He has worked in a number of media, including painting and drawing, but has become known particularly for his expertly rendered figures in clay modelled in a naturalistic style but showing the artist’s links with his Cherokee ancestors who have a long cultural tradition of working in clay. Creating his vessels both on the wheel and by hand, he manages to drawn attention to Southeastern indigenous people and their experiences as well as combining these with influences found in European art traditions....

Article

Canadian First Nations (Dunne-Zaa/Beaver), 20th–21st century, male.

Born 1970, in Fort St. John (British Columbia).

Sculpture, painting, graphic art, mixed media, installation art.

Born in rural British Columbia in 1970, Jungen was actively interested in drawing as a child. Both his mother (Dunne-Zaa) and father (Swiss-Canadian) died when he was young. After high school, he moved to Vancouver and completed a Diploma in Visual Art at Emily Carr College of Art in ...

Article

Native American (Inupiaq/Athabascan), 21st century, female.

Born 1969, in Bethal (Alaska).

Painter, sculptor, draughtsman, installation artist.

Inupiaq/Athabascan artist Sonya Kelliher-Combs holds a BFA from the University of Alaska–Fairbanks (1998) and an MFA from Arizona State University (1992). In 2007 she was awarded an Eiteljorg Fellowship for Native American Fine Art. Her work is included in the collections of the Anchorage Museum, Alaska State Museum, University of Alaska Museum of the North and Eiteljorg Museum....