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Article

Spanish, 18th – 19th century, male.

Painter.

Adriazola was also a mathematician, journalist and soldier.

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born c. 1755, in Paris.

Painter.

Son of a printer based in the Rue St-Germain, Jean-Jacques Auger entered Du Rameau's workshop at the École of the Académie Royale in August 1770.

Article

Hugh Belsey

(b Dublin, 1728 or 1732; d London, May 29, 1784).

Irish painter . The son of a tailor, he first trained as a staymaker but then found work colouring prints for Silcock, a publisher in Dublin. In 1747 he was awarded first prize at the Dublin Society’s School, where he studied under Robert West. Among Barret’s earliest works is a group of landscapes (Dublin, N.G.) painted for Joseph Leeson, later 1st Earl of Miltown, in the 1740s and 1750s as architectural decorations for Russborough House, Co. Wicklow, built in 1742–55 by Richard Castle. They are rather stiff Italianate views, with somewhat contrived compositions. In the 1750s, perhaps through the influence of Edmund Burke, Barret embarked on a series of topographical paintings of the Dargle Valley, Powerscourt, Castletown and other locations around Dublin. These works established his reputation, and he moved to London in 1763. The following year he won a 50-guinea premium for a painting exhibited at the Free Society of Artists, and he was soon taken up by English patrons. In ...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born 25 September 1731, in Abbeville; died 7 December 1797, in Abbeville.

Draughtsman, engraver (etching/burin), print publisher.

He came to Paris when he was very young, and trained with Charles Dupuis and Laurent Cars. He quickly earned a reputation as a skilled engraver. His work is characterised by fine, fluid, deft strokes of the burin. He was granted the title of Engraver to the King and, on ...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born c. 1750.

Draughtsman.

This artist worked in England. In 1780 the Archaeological Society employed him to travel round Ireland, and draw and describe its abbeys, castles and ancient tombs. His travel journal was published in 1881, under the title Memoirs of Gabriel Béranger...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Active in Paris.

Died 1785.

Painter, print publisher.

Article

David Blayney Brown

(b London, c. 1758; d Byfleet, Surrey, June 4, 1834).

Miniature painter and publisher. He was originally self-taught and then a pupil of John Smart (1741–1811), whose work he copied and whose style he imitated: between 1783 and 1828 he was an occasional exhibitor at the Royal Academy, being appointed in 1789 painter in watercolours to George III and miniature painter to Queen Charlotte (1744–1818). He was a keen promoter of history painting and in 1792 launched a prospectus for an edition of David Hume’s History of England, to be ‘superbly embellished’ with illustrations engraved after historical paintings by leading artists, including Benjamin West, Robert Smirke, Francis Wheatley and Philippe-Jacques de Loutherbourg. Bowyer also published the Historic Gallery, which, until its failure, with great financial loss, in 1806, provided substantial patronage to history painters and fostered a taste for national history paintings, especially of medieval subjects. The five folios that appeared contained, in addition to engravings of historical paintings, engraved portraits, manuscripts and antiquarian material. Bowyer also published ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1772, in Nantes; died 1817, in Paris.

Draughtsman, engraver (etching/burin), print publisher.

Alexis Chataigner, a pupil of François-Marie Queverdo, was one of the most prolific engravers of the Revolution and the Empire.

Paris, 14 Dec 1935: The Husband's Departure...

Article

French, 17th – 18th century, male.

Born 1660, in Paris; died c. 1730.

Draughtsman, engraver (burin), print publisher.

Jean Crépy was the brother of Louis Crépy and is best remembered for his portraits. Le Blanc attributes 35 plates to him.

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Active in Paris.

Born c. 1680.

Draughtsman, engraver (burin), print publisher.

Louis Crépy made engravings after Le Brun, Lancret, Van Loo and Watteau.

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Versailles.

Draughtsman, engraver (burin), print publisher.

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born 1734, in Paris.

Draughtsman, print publisher, musician.

He drew the illustrations for a number of travel books: Pictures... of Switzerland ( Tableaux... de la Suisse) (Paris, 1780-86), Description... of France ( Description... de la France) and Story of Saugnier's journeys to the African coast...

Article

(b Paris, Oct 5, 1733; d Versailles, Sept 3, 1796).

French painter. The son of a copperplate printer, he worked with the sculptor Jean-Baptiste Defernex before entering the Académie Royale in 1754, where he studied under Jean-Baptiste Pierre. After three unsuccessful attempts he won the Grand Prix de Rome in 1757 with Elijah Raising the Shunammite Woman’s Son from the Dead (Paris, Ecole B.-A.). He studied (1757–60) at the Ecole des Elèves Protégés in Paris under Carle Vanloo, afterwards transferring to the Académie de France in Rome. During his time in Rome (1761–4) Durameau completed his artistic education, while also making copies after the Old Masters for Pierre-Jean Mariette and studying antique art for the Abbé de Saint-Non. In addition, he painted the genre work, the Saltpetre Factory (Paris, Louvre), which is one of the first industrial landscapes and in its invention and authority worthy of the finest passages of Jean-Honoré Fragonard.

After his return to Paris Durameau pursued the traditional career of a history painter and was accepted into the Académie Royale in ...

Article

Tapati Guha-Thakurta

In 

Article

Article

Swiss, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 30 November 1764, in Le Locle; died 2 January 1823, in Paris.

Draughtsman, engraver (burin).

At the age of 15, Abraham Girardet was already engraving plates for publications edited by his father, the publisher and bookseller Samuel Girardet. In ...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born 1756, in Paris; died 1806.

Engraver, draughtsman, print publisher.

Laurent Guyot studied under Tiliard. He made his debut at the Salon in 1793 with views of the countryside around Rome after Pernet, and several genre scenes after Mallet, Lheine, Garneray, and Bellanger. That so many well established artists should supply him with their subjects for reproduction suggests that he was already enjoying a healthy reputation. It can be surmised that Guyot, like many other young artists, was reluctant to exhibit in the restrictive academic climate of the time, which had seen the abolition of the Académie de Saint Luc. Even so, Guyot already ranked among the best colour engravers. At the ...

Article

Patrick Conner, David Tatham and Tapati Guha-Thakurta

English family of artists. Daniel Havell (d ?1826) was an engraver and publisher of topographical and architectural works distinguished by a delicacy of line. He worked in London and was for a time in partnership with Robert Havell I (1769–1832), a painter, engraver and publisher. According to their descendants, Robert was undeniably Daniel’s son, though there is evidence to suggest that he may have been his uncle. The family firm engraved work by (1) William Havell, a cousin of Daniel Havell, and a painter and traveller. Robert Havell I later became self-employed and set up in business for a time in Oxford Street with his son (2) Robert Havell jr. In 1839 Robert Havell jr went to the USA at the invitation of John James Audubon, for whom he had engraved many of the plates for Birds of America. (3) Ernest Binfield Havell, a great-nephew of (1) William Havell, seems to have inherited the family love of travel and painting and became a distinguished art teacher in India and a scholar of Indian art....

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born 9 May 1695, in Orléans; died 11 June 1772, in Paris.

Painter, engraver, designer of ornamental architectural features, print dealer.

There is much confusion about the biography and whereabouts of the Huquiers, apparently because of mistakes in earlier works about Gabriel and Jacques Gabriel. Le Blanc swaps their first names around, giving the father the names of the son. Bryan's Dictionary states that Gabriel died in London, yet there is a certificate of burial drawn up in the parish of St-Benoît for the 30 June 1772 to prove the opposite. His alleged flight to England following the publication of a pamphlet attacking the Jesuits and subsequently pinned on him has not been verified and fits better with what we know of Jacques Gabriel. Because of their place in the history of French engraving, it is a matter of no small importance to get as clear a view as possible of these artists....

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