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Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Engraver, draughtsman.

According to Zani, Antonio di Alessio was also a publisher. Otley mentions three of his decorative engravings: a frontispiece with a dedication addressed to the publisher Antonio Lafreri; another showing trophies of arms and a sphinx; and a third showing a Triton playing a violin, a mask and a sphinx....

Article

German, 15th century, male.

Born c. 1435; died 1504.

Painter, miniaturist, illuminator, writer, printer. Religious subjects.

School of Alsace.

Hans Baemler's name appears for the first time in 1453. He established himself in Augsburg as a printer. His name appears on two miniatures, a Crucifixion...

Article

French, 16th century, male.

Active in Paris in 1573.

Painter, engraver, print publisher.

Marolles says that Thomas Belot was a painter. A print exists by him, made in Laon and dated 1566, entitled Image Representing the Triumphant Victory of Our Saviour and Lord Jesus Christ...

Article

German, 16th century, male.

Active in Bamberg.

Painter, sculptor.

Albrecht Dürer mentions Lucas Benedikt in his journal.

Article

Flemish School, 16th century, female.

Born 1528, in Liège; died 1598, in Frankfurt.

Engraver, draughtsman, goldsmith.

Théodore de Bry lived in Frankfurt where he was also a publisher. He worked for a long time in England. His engravings, with those of his sons, are considered to be among the best of the Netherlands....

Article

German, 16th century, male.

Active in Augsburg.

Painter, print publisher.

Anthony Cortoys the Elder lived in Frankfurt am Main and in Heidelberg, where it seems he died. He was the father of Anthony Corthoys the Younger.

Article

German, 16th century, male.

Born 1528, in Heidelberg (Baden-Württemberg); died 22 March 1590, in Frankfurt.

Painter, engraver.

Sigmond Feyerabend is mainly known as a publisher.

Article

French, 16th century, male.

Painter, engraver. Religious subjects, allegorical subjects.

The life of this artist is unknown. He has been associated with the printer Jean de Gourmont who was active in Paris between 1506 and 1520. Other critics have claimed that he was a goldsmith because of his subtle and precise touch. Over 40 line engravings signed with the monogram ...

Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Active in Venice.

Painter, engraver (wood), print publisher.

In 1546, having returned from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, Domenico dalle Greche produced paintings from the sketches that he had brought back. His principal work is a series of 12 engravings on wood of ...

Article

German, 16th century, male.

Born in Germany; died 1583, in Paris.

Draughtsman, engraver (wood), printer.

Jacob Kerver was the son of Thielmann Kerver, and was probably his student. His works include, notably, 128 woodcuts for Polyphemus's Dream by Colonna, based on drawings by Mantegna, The Last Supper...

Article

German, 16th century, male.

Active in Paris.

Died between 1522 and 1531.

Engraver, draughtsman, printer.

Thielmann Kerver is believed to have produced woodcuts for prayer books.

Article

French, 16th century, male.

Active in Paris.

Painter, print publisher, engraver.

Le Blond engraved a number of religious subjects.

Article

German, 16th century, male.

Active in Nuremberg.

Died 1601.

Painter, illuminator, printer.

Coburg (Prints Collection)

London (British Mus.)

Nuremberg (Germanisches Nationalmus.)

Article

German, 16th century, male.

Active in Nuremberg between 1520 and 1531.

Painter, engraver (wood), printer.

Nuremberg School.

Nicolaus Meldemann made engravings of battle and genre scenes.

Article

Flemish School, 16th century, male.

Born 1528, in Antwerp; died 25 July 1580.

Engraver (wood), draughtsman, printer, print publisher. Cards.

This artist was the son of Matthias van de Putte. He worked in Mechelen and in Antwerp.

Article

French, 16th century, male.

Born between 1540 and 1545, in Beauvais; died 5 March 1603, in Paris.

Painter, engraver, writer, print publisher. Portraits.

Jean Rabel was the father of Daniel Rabel. He was engaged as the master painter of the Pont St-Michel. Rabel was a talented artist who, according to l'Estoile, was a leading portraitist (Malherbe even dedicated a sonnet to him and his work). His body of engravings consists primarily of religious themes and portraits, including those of ...

Article

Italian, 15th – 16th century, male.

Born 1445, in Florence; died before 1513.

Painter, miniaturist.

Francesco di Lorenzo Rosselli stayed in Budapest and in Venice. He was a cosmographer and printer as well as a painter. He worked for Siena Cathedral and drew and printed views of cities....

Article

Flemish School, 16th century, male.

Active also in Germany and England.

Born 1550, in Brussels; died August 1600, in Venice.

Draughtsman, engraver (burin), print dealer.

Jean Sadeler I's father was an inlaid metal worker and Jean was trained for this profession. However, he devoted himself at an early age to the study of the human figure. When he was about 20 he began to engrave on copper and in 1572 he was admitted as a master to the guild of St Luke. It has been said that he travelled in Germany and worked in Cologne from 1580 to 1587. The facts, or at least the dates, may not be correct, because according the guild archives, Gillis Sadeler was a pupil of his in 1585. In 1587 he is referred to in Frankfurt, and in 1589 in Munich, where Duke William II of Bavaria granted him a pension of 200 gold florins. He went to Rome in 1593 or 1595, and finally to Venice. During these travels he engraved a large number of plates and his overall output was considerable....

Article

Judith K. Golden

Anonymous collection of in-depth typologies, based on the idea that every event in the New Testament was presaged by an event in the Old Testament ( see Typological cycles ). The Speculum humanae salvationis appeared first in manuscript form, then as Block-book s and later as incunabula. Chief among possible sources for the text is Ludolphus of Saxony (c. 1300–77), with Conradus of Altzheim, Vincent of Beauvais, Henricus Suso and Nicholas of Lyra among others also suggested authors. Like copies of the earlier Biblia pauperum, tituli and captions identify events and figures, however the Speculum humanae salvationis augments these pictures with a text that explains the illustrations. Between the early 14th century and the end of the 15th, several hundred copies, nearly all illustrated, were produced and translated from the original Latin into German, French, English, Dutch and Czech.

Typically the manuscripts include a Prologue and Prohemium, of text only; followed by forty-two chapters with four miniatures atop four text columns each of twenty-five lines; closing with three chapters with eight miniatures devoted to the Seven Stations of the Passion, the Seven Sorrows and the Seven Joys of Mary, these last three chapters not being typological. Some manuscripts omit opening texts or the final three chapters. Each opening provides a meditative, typological diptych of four images and clarifying text, for example Christ and the Last Supper as the first image, followed by Moses and the Miracle of Manna; Moses and Passover; Abraham blessed by Melchisedek. The first image contains gospel citations; the last three have captions indicating their relationship to the first....

Article

German, 16th century, male.

Born between 1505 and 1506; died between October 1575 and October 1576, in Augsburg.

Painter, architect, writer, print publisher.

From 1531 onwards, Tirol worked in Augsburg, where he painted frescoes, illustrated historical works and painted architectural views and portraits.