1-20 of 23 results  for:

  • Interior Design and Furniture x
  • Renaissance/Baroque Art x
  • Eighteenth-Century Art x
Clear all

Article

Hans-Peter Wittwer

Swiss-Italian stuccoist and architect. He drew up the plans for the abbey church of Muri (1694–7), Switzerland, which is regarded as the consummation of the centrally planned church and one of the most beautiful Baroque buildings in Switzerland. Bettini’s scheme involved reconstructing the cruciform Romanesque abbey church. The twin towers and the low choir spanned by a Gothic lierne vault were retained, but the nave was converted into an octagonal rotunda with transeptal chapels. The ends of the former aisles, at the west and east, lie outside the octagon and are used to form galleries. The eight arches defining the octagon are of equal height but unequal width. Uniformity of height is obtained in the narrower, diagonal arches by raising the imposts rather than by stilting the arches. A large saucer dome, with stucco ornamentation by Bettini, covers the rotunda, admitting light, via penetrations, from semicircular windows set on a slightly curving entablature inside, supported by folded pilasters. Bettini’s reputation is based on evidence that he produced designs for the building, while the more famous architect ...

Article

Dwight C. Miller

Italian painter and stuccoist. He was largely self-taught yet gifted with exceptional talent—‘such praiseworthy qualities not the fruit of long toil but of gifts with which the painter was endowed’ (Zanotti)—and thus able to establish a position among the most highly reputed artists in Bologna of his time. He was chosen four times (...

Article

Eleanor John

French cabinetmaker. His family were originally from Guelderland in the Netherlands and went to Paris, where his father worked as a ‘menuisier en ébène’. Boulle became a master before 1666, when he is recorded as a ‘maître menuisier en ébène’; at this time he lived and worked in the rue de Reims near Saint-Etienne-du-Mont. He was granted the royal privilege of lodging in the Galeries du Louvre on ...

Article

Birgit Roth

Italian stuccoist. He was taught to draw by his father, the painter Giovanni Francesco Bussi, but then concentrated on developing a career as a stuccoist. He began his career in Milan, where he worked on the decoration of numerous palaces, but was then summoned to Vienna by Eugene, Prince of Savoy. From ...

Article

Klaus Lankheit

German sculptor, stuccoist, draughtsman and illustrator. He was the most important sculptor active in Franconia and the Palatinate in the first half of the 18th century; nevertheless, although his very individual late Baroque sculpture, mostly carved in wood, was highly regarded by his contemporaries, he was quickly forgotten after his death. His rich oeuvre was severely depleted, particularly as a result of World War II. It was only after that date that his importance was reassessed. Egell probably served an apprenticeship with the Würzburg sculptor ...

Article

Maria Ida Catalano

Italian sculptor, architect and furniture-maker. He was the eldest son of the sculptor and carver Grazioso Fantoni (1630–93) and trained in his father’s flourishing workshop, which played a leading part in the supply of church furnishings in Bergamo, Parma and the surrounding provinces. In ...

Article

Andrew Stoga

Italian stuccoist and architect, active in Moravia and Poland. He was a pupil of Carlo Fontana and Antonio Raggi. Most of Baldassare Fontana’s surviving works date from his early period in Moravia, including the decoration of the Archbishop’s Palace in Kroměříž and his most important decorative work at the Norbertine monastery (...

Article

Bernd Wolfgang Lindemann

German sculptor and stuccoist. He may have trained with his uncle, the sculptor Ignaz Langelacher, in Moravia; the quality of his work suggests that he had some academic training, possibly in Munich, perhaps in the studio of Johann Baptist Straub. He worked in stone and in wood, as well as in stucco. In ...

Article

Gabriele Ramsauer

Austrian cabinetmaker. His life was spent working as a joiner at St Florian Abbey. In 1703 he was making architectural sections for the new church seating. In 1708 and 1711 he was making architectural models, including one for the main doorway that was executed in ...

Article

Nicola Smith

French painter, active in England. His father, a Catalan, was Keeper of Louis XIV’s menagerie, and the King was his godfather. Laguerre studied first with the Jesuits and then enrolled at the Académie Royale de Peinture et Sculpture, Paris. This was followed by a short period in the studio of ...

Article

Gabriele Ramsauer

French architect and designer, active in Austria. He was involved in designing and furnishing the interior of Prince Eugene of Savoy’s Stadtpalais in Vienna in 1707 and was mentioned in 1714 as Governor of the Arsenal. Two years later he was recorded in connection with work on a state bed for Empress ...

Article

Fausta Franchini Guelfi

Italian sculptor and wood-carver. In 1680 he entered the workshop of his uncle, the sculptor Giovanni Battista Agnesi, as an apprentice, but he also attended the workshop of the furniture-maker Pietro Andrea Torre (d 1668). By 1688 he already had his own workshop in partnership with ...

Article

Alison Luchs

Italian sculptor, stuccoist and architect. After training in Florence as a goldsmith, he studied with the painter Felice Ficherelli. In 1671 he went to Rome, having been chosen for the Tuscan Accademia Granducale. He studied sculpture under Ercole Ferrata and Ciro Ferri, showing a predilection for modelling rather than the marble carving expected by his patron, ...

Article

Maria Helena Mendes Pinto

Portuguese cabinetmaker and metalworker. The most outstanding characteristic of his documented works—all commissioned by religious institutions—is his use of pau preto (Brazilian rose-wood), either solid or thickly veneered on to chestnut, worked em espinhado (in a herring-bone pattern) decorated with parallel grooves, mouldings and, more rarely, with ...

Article

John Mawer

Dutch cabinetmaker. He is particularly associated with spectacular floral-marquetry cabinets. His Amsterdam workshops also produced such other furniture in the Baroque style as tables and guéridons en suite with the cabinets. The marquetry designs, derived from Dutch still-life paintings, achieved brilliant trompe l’oeil effects through the use of various coloured veneers (...

Article

Bohemian wood-carver and cabinetmaker of German origin. He was probably the son of Georg Nonnenmacher, a cabinetmaker, and first worked in Konstanz; he is recorded in Prague from 1677. He supplied altars for churches in Prague and nearby villages; he acted as a contractor, himself paying the sculptors, wood-carvers and painters, which in ...

Article

Donatella Germanó Siracusa

Italian sculptor, stuccoist and medallist. He worked in southern central Italy, where he is documented as both Pietro Papaleo and Francesco Papaleo, and then in Rome, where his presence is well documented from 1694, when he was elected a member of the Accademia di S Luca, until ...

Article

Peter Fidler

Austrian architect, sculptor and stuccoist. He was an important architect of the Austrian Baroque, which he combined with a craftsman’s understanding of local traditions and building techniques. He was apprenticed as a mason to Hans Georg Asam at Schnan, Tyrol, from 1677 to 1680. His journeyman years may have been spent in southern Germany. In ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

The reign of Queen Anne (1702–14) was not of particular significance for the decorative arts in England, except in the area of Huguenot silverware. In England the style of this period is now usually described as late Baroque rather than Queen Anne; in America, however, the term ‘Queen Anne’ is used to describe the decorative style of objects made from the mid-1720s to ...

Article

French family of cabinetmakers of Dutch origin. Bernard van Risamburgh (i) (b Groningen, c. 1660; d Paris, 2 Jan 1738) was active in Paris before 1694. The rediscovery of his work makes an important contribution to the analysis of the furniture of the period, providing a striking illustration of the transition from the Baroque to the Louis XV style. Risamburgh used tortoiseshell and brass marquetry in a manner quite different from that of André Charles Boulle. He often collaborated with the ...