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Article

Danish, 17th century, male.

Active in Copenhagen.

Sculptor, decorative artist.

Alversen collaborated on the decoration of the old royal library in Copenhagen, finished in 1673.

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Born 1628, in Eu (Seine-Maritime); died 18 June 1708, in Paris.

Painter, decorative designer, architect. Ornaments.

Guillaume Anguier, a brother of the well-known sculptors Michel and François, was one of the artists employed on Colbert's orders in the Gobelins factory. He was granted the title of 'king's painter' and worked on the decoration of the great staircase at the Louvre and of the châteaux of St-Germain-en-Laye and Versailles. He was also an architect....

Article

Swedish, 17th century, male.

Sculptor, decorative artist.

Hans Anders Anthony carried out the decoration of Jakobsdal castle for Count de la Gardie in 1664. He worked in stucco.

Article

Sophie Page

Astrology is the art of predicting events on earth as well as human character and disposition from the movements of the planets and fixed stars. Medieval astrology encompassed both general concepts of celestial influence, and the technical art of making predictions with horoscopes, symbolic maps of the heavens at particular moments and places constructed from astronomical information. The scientific foundations of the art were developed in ancient Greece, largely lost in early medieval Europe and recovered by the Latin West from Arabic sources in the 12th and 13th centuries. Late medieval astrological images were successfully Christianized and were adapted to particular contexts, acquired local meanings and changed over time....

Article

Spanish, 17th century, male.

Born in Gordejuela (Vizcaya, Basque Country); died 1621, in Valladolid.

Architect, sculptor, cabinet maker.

Basoco is cited from 1597 to 1621. He worked on the choir stalls of St Francis' church in Aranzazu (Guipúzcoa). In 1621 he took on the work of the high altar in St Michael's church in Fuente Ampudia, but had to interrupt this project due to illness, handing over to Pedro Martínez de Colina, who completed it....

Article

Italian stuccoist, sculptor, painter and costume designer, active in France and England. He worked in France as a painter (1515–22), probably under Jean Perréal and Jean Bourdichon, then in Mantua, possibly under Giulio Romano, possibly calling himself ‘da Milano’. By 1532 he was at ...

Article

Swedish, 17th century, male.

Active in Sweden between 1638 and 1666.

Sculptor, decorative designer.

Two of Heinrich Blume's relatives, the sculptors Christian and Gerth Blume, are documented as working in the same period.

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Born c. 1580; died 1636, in Paris.

Sculptor, cabinet maker.

Pierre Boulle lived at the Louvre and was a turner and carpenter of ebony cabinets for the king. His sons Jacques (born 1618) and Paul (born 1621) were also cabinet-makers....

Article

Darius Sikorski

Italian stuccoist and sculptor. He enjoyed extensive patronage from the court of Guidobaldo II della Rovere, Duke of Urbino, for whom he modelled fireplaces and entire ceilings representing allegories of princely prerogative and aristocratic supremacy. This practice, unusual in Italy (where stucco was generally a decorative adjunct to fresco), may be partly explained by the fact that Guidobaldo did not retain a permanent court painter....

Article

Gordon Campbell

In ancient Greek art, a sculpture of a young woman carrying a basket on her head. The motif was subsequently adopted in architectural decoration (sometimes with a young man instead of a woman) and in furniture from the Renaissance and later periods.

Article

Spanish, 16th – 17th century, male.

Active in Granada (1587-1615), then in Seville (1615-1630).

Born to a family originally from Almodovar del Campo.

Sculptor, cabinet maker.

Miguel Cano was the father of Alonso Cano.

Article

Cassone  

Ellen Callmann and J. W. Taylor

Term used for large, lavishly decorated chests made in Italy from the 14th century to the end of the 16th. The word is an anachronism, taken from Vasari (2/1568, ed. G. Milanesi, 1878–85, ii, p. 148), the 15th-century term being forziero. Wealthy households needed many chests, but the ornate ...

Article

Kathryn A. Charles

Italian sculptor and stuccoist. Noted for his decorative work, trophies, masks and stucco ornaments, he was trained in the style of Michelangelo by Andrea Ferrucci in Florence. His first independent commission, the tomb of Raffaelle Maffei (il Volterrano) in S Lino at Volterra (...

Article

Paul Barolsky

Italian painter, stuccoist and sculptor. Much of the fascination of his career resides in the development of his style from provincial origins to a highly sophisticated manner, combining the most accomplished elements of the art of Michelangelo, Raphael and their Mannerist followers in a distinctive and highly original way. He provided an influential model for numerous later artists in Rome....

Article

French sculptor and stuccoist of Dutch birth. He trained in Antwerp with Peeter Verbrugghen (i) and at some time in the 1650s went to Paris. There he worked with the sculptors Gérard van Opstal and the brothers Gaspard and Balthazar Marsy, who had also trained in the southern Netherlands. He worked (...

Article

Klaus Lankheit

German sculptor, stuccoist, draughtsman and illustrator. He was the most important sculptor active in Franconia and the Palatinate in the first half of the 18th century; nevertheless, although his very individual late Baroque sculpture, mostly carved in wood, was highly regarded by his contemporaries, he was quickly forgotten after his death. His rich oeuvre was severely depleted, particularly as a result of World War II. It was only after that date that his importance was reassessed. Egell probably served an apprenticeship with the Würzburg sculptor ...

Article

Maria Ida Catalano

Italian sculptor, architect and furniture-maker. He was the eldest son of the sculptor and carver Grazioso Fantoni (1630–93) and trained in his father’s flourishing workshop, which played a leading part in the supply of church furnishings in Bergamo, Parma and the surrounding provinces. In ...

Article

Richard Bösel

Italian architect, sculptor and interior designer. His prowess in many fields of art and his remarkable facility of production led him to a position of unchallenged supremacy in 17th-century Neapolitan architecture, where his styles exhibit every nuance, from the severe classicism of Early Baroque via an exuberant use of coloured marbles and the occasional exploitation of Mannerist detail, to a scenographic Late Baroque....

Article

German sculptor, medallist, cabinetmaker, woodcutter and designer. It has been conjectured on stylistic grounds that between 1515 and 1518 he was active in Augsburg and worked in Hans Daucher’s workshop on the sculptural decoration (destr.) of the Fugger funerary chapel in St Anna. His early style was formed by the Italianism of Daucher and of Hans Burgkmair I and also by a journey to Italy in ...

Article

Henri Zerner

Term that encompasses work in a wide variety of media, including painting, sculpture, stuccowork and printmaking, produced from the 1530s to the first decade of the 17th century in France (e.g. The Nymph of Fontainebleau). It evokes an unreal and poetic world of elegant, elongated figures, often in mythological settings, as well as incorporating rich, intricate ornamentation with a characteristic type of strapwork. The phrase was first used by ...