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Article

German, 16th – 17th century, male.

Active in Augsburg in 1570.

Born c. 1547, in Colmar; died 1617, in Augsburg.

Enameller, goldsmith.

Article

German sculptor, medallist, cabinetmaker, woodcutter and designer. It has been conjectured on stylistic grounds that between 1515 and 1518 he was active in Augsburg and worked in Hans Daucher’s workshop on the sculptural decoration (destr.) of the Fugger funerary chapel in St Anna. His early style was formed by the Italianism of Daucher and of Hans Burgkmair I and also by a journey to Italy in ...

Article

Swiss, 16th – 17th century, male.

Baptised 21 January 1572; died 12 October 1633.

Enameller, goldsmith. Portraits.

Article

Swiss, 16th – 17th century, male.

Born c. 1537, in La Grave; died 20 September 1611, in Geneva.

Enameller, engraver, goldsmith.

Article

Alison Luchs

Italian sculptor, stuccoist and architect. After training in Florence as a goldsmith, he studied with the painter Felice Ficherelli. In 1671 he went to Rome, having been chosen for the Tuscan Accademia Granducale. He studied sculpture under Ercole Ferrata and Ciro Ferri, showing a predilection for modelling rather than the marble carving expected by his patron, ...

Article

Maria Helena Mendes Pinto

Portuguese cabinetmaker and metalworker. The most outstanding characteristic of his documented works—all commissioned by religious institutions—is his use of pau preto (Brazilian rose-wood), either solid or thickly veneered on to chestnut, worked em espinhado (in a herring-bone pattern) decorated with parallel grooves, mouldings and, more rarely, with ...

Article

Italian sculptor, stuccoist and bronze-caster. His work was considered to be by two artists until Keutner (1991–2) proposed that Carlo di Cesari and Carlo Pallago were the same person. Most of his creative career was spent working at the courts of German princes; so far his name has been connected with surviving works only north of the Alps. He is documented as working, in his early years, as an assistant to ...

Article

Donatella Germanó Siracusa

Italian sculptor, stuccoist and medallist. He worked in southern central Italy, where he is documented as both Pietro Papaleo and Francesco Papaleo, and then in Rome, where his presence is well documented from 1694, when he was elected a member of the Accademia di S Luca, until ...

Article

French, 17th century, male.

Born 12 July 1607, in Geneva, to French parents; died 3 April 1691, in Vevey.

Miniaturist, enameller, draughtsman.

Jean Petitot was the son of Faule Petitot the Burgundian. He served as an apprentice jeweller and goldsmith with Pierre Bordier, acquiring a taste for painting on enamel. Persuading his master and friend to spend some time travelling about France, the two men went to Limoges and then to London. Charles I commissioned the enamellers to made a number of portraits, giving them a workshop in Whitehall and also making Jean Petitot a knight....

Article

German, 17th century, male.

Born 1603, in Flachslanden; died 1663, in Durlach.

Engraver, sculptor, engineer, medallist.

Georg Pfründt completed his artistic education in Lyons in 1642 and continued his training under Jean Warin in Paris between 1644 and 1646. Thereafter he was active in the courts in southern Germany and Salzburg. His output consisted of terracottas and medals. He was also engineer to the Duke of Weimar, and carried out engravings of geographical and architectural subjects....

Article

Gordon Campbell

The reign of Queen Anne (1702–14) was not of particular significance for the decorative arts in England, except in the area of Huguenot silverware. In England the style of this period is now usually described as late Baroque rather than Queen Anne; in America, however, the term ‘Queen Anne’ is used to describe the decorative style of objects made from the mid-1720s to ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

German family of goldsmiths , based in Nuremberg. The founder of the family was Christoph Ritter the elder (d 1572), whose best-known surviving work is a salt-cellar topped with an enamelled Crucifixion group (London, priv. col.), which he made in 1551 for the Nuremberg City Treasury. His son Christoph Ritter the younger (...

Article

French, 16th – 17th century, male.

Born 1578, in Châteaudun; died 14 June 1644, in Paris.

Miniaturist, enameller, engraver (etching).

Jean Toutin I worked for goldsmiths and was one of the first artists to paint miniatures on enamel.