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Article

British, 19th century, male.

Active in Worcester.

Landscape artist.

W. Rodway Barnes exhibited in London in 1886. He is possibly the same person as the painter and illustrator, William Rodney Barnes.

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 25 November 1870, in Granville; died 13 November 1943, in St-Germain-en-Laye, in a traffic accident.

Painter, watercolourist, engraver, lithographer, draughtsman, illustrator, designer. Religious subjects, figure compositions, figures, nudes, portraits, rustic scenes, scenes with figures, landscapes, gardens, urban landscapes, church interiors, still-lifes...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1749, in Versailles; died 1825, in Paris.

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, sculptor, draughtsman (wash), engraver, decorative artist. Mythological subjects, allegorical subjects, historical portraits, hunting scenes, interiors with figures, gardens. Stage costumes and sets, furniture, designs for fabrics, frontispieces.

Dugourc's father, who was in the service of the Duke of Orléans, had a considerable fortune. Dugourc was permitted to attend the lessons taken by the Duke of Chartres (the future Philippe-Égalité), and at the age 15 left for Rome, attached to the embassy of the Count of Cani. From his infancy, he had shown an aptitude for drawing, perspective and architecture. However, the death of his mother, followed shortly after by the loss of his father's fortune, changed his life. From being an amateur, Dugourc became a professional artist, and executed paintings, sculptures and engravings. In a work published in ...

Article

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 9 April 1860, in Frankfurt am Main; died 1944.

Painter, engraver (etching), illustrator. Figures, portraits, interiors with figures, landscapes with figures, waterscapes, gardens.

Franck studied at the Städel Institute in Frankfurt, and from 1881 under K. F. Eduard von Gebhardt and E.G. Drücker at the fine arts academy in Düsseldorf. He lived successively in Potsdam, Würzburg, Halle and Berlin, and from ...

Article

Danish, 20th century, male.

Born 29 July 1897.

Engraver, illustrator.

The work of Sikker Hansen is marked by his ability to simplify and to create typical characters. A landscape artist, he loved bucolic subjects and country people and illustrated numerous books on Copenhagen. He was highly skilled in the technique of producing four-colour prints....

Article

Robert Williams

(b London, Nov 29, 1843; d Godalming, Surrey, Dec 8, 1932).

English garden designer and writer. Best remembered for her books on horticulture and the gardens she made with the architect Edwin Lutyens, she first trained (1861–3) as a painter at the Kensington School of Art, London, and (c. 1870) under Hercules Brabazon Brabazon. Private means allowed her to concentrate on learning one art or craft after another, from embroidery to stone-carving. In 1882 she began contributing horticultural articles to magazines and advising acquaintances on planting schemes. She met the young Lutyens in 1889 and introduced him to some of his first important clients. He designed Munstead Wood, Godalming, for her in 1896. True to her Arts and Crafts background, Jekyll promoted the cottage-garden style of old-fashioned flowers, informally planted; her opinions and expertise made her a household name. Her first book, Wood and Garden, illustrated with her own photographs, appeared in 1899. Her schemes for about 300 gardens are known (numerous plans, Berkeley, U. CA, Coll. Envmt. Des., Doc. Col.), of which about 100 involved ...

Article

Michael Spens

(Alan)

(b London, Oct 8, 1900; d July 16, 1996).

English landscape designer, urban planner, architect and writer. He was educated in London at the Architectural Association School (1919–24). His book Italian Gardens of the Renaissance (with J. C. Shepherd), derived from student research, was published in 1925, the year in which he qualified as an architect. He soon established his practice in London. In the 1930s he was instrumental in developing the Institute of Landscape Architects (now the Landscape Institute) as a professional body. He taught at the Architectural Association School (1928–33), becoming its Principal in 1939. His projects of the 1930s include the village plan (1933) for Broadway, Hereford & Worcs, a model document under the Town and Country Planning Act of 1932, and, with Russell Page (1906–85), a pioneer modernist restaurant and visitors’ centre (1934) at Cheddar Gorge, Somerset. Important garden designs of these years include Ditchley Park (...

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 8 April 1880, in Anzin; died 20 September 1947, in Paris.

Painter, draughtsman (charcoal), engraver, lithographer, illustrator, designer. Historical subjects, military subjects, religious subjects, sporting subjects, figures, portraits, historical portraits, scenes with figures, local scenes, genre scenes, street scenes, interiors with figures, church interiors, landscapes, waterscapes, seascapes, gardens, panoramas...

Article

Roger White

(b Twickenham, bapt Sept 14, 1696; d London, March 3, 1751).

English architect and writer. The son of a gardener, he first tried his hand as a landscape gardener in Twickenham and published several books that reveal his practical knowledge of the subject, notably New Principles of Gardening (1728) and Pomona (1729). He deplored the rigid formality of continental horticulture and followed Stephen Switzer in advocating the introduction of the serpentine line into layout and planting. By 1731 he had moved to London, where at different times he ran a drawing school in Soho, manufactured artificial stone ornaments, engaged in polemical journalism and produced a succession of architectural publications.

Langley’s classical pattern books plagiarized an astonishing variety of sources, both Baroque and Palladian, although it is clear from their tone and that of his newspaper articles that he had little sympathy for the prevailing Palladian orthodoxy of Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington, and his followers. This may explain why, despite energetic self-publicity, he never managed to establish himself as a practising architect—his unsuccessful design (...

Article

Czechoslovak, 20th century, male.

Active in Germany.

Born 21 July 1870, in Prague; died 8 August 1932 or or, in Berlin.

Painter, watercolourist, engraver (wood/etching), lithographer, illustrator, draughtsman. Portraits, street scenes, rustic scenes, landscapes, gardens, landscapes with figures, urban views, still-lifes, flowers. Stage sets, posters, ex-libris plates...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 1804, in Paris or in Strasbourg; died October 1889, in Paris.

Landscape artist, illustrator.

Camille Saglio was a student of Holivard and Roqueplan. He exhibited at the Salon from 1839 to 1875, obtaining a second-class medal in 1846. He produced a large number of works depicting the banks of the Rhine and the Rhône. He illustrated Adolphe Badin's book ...

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 20 April 1920, in Paris; died 2000.

Painter, watercolourist, lithographer, illustrator. Figures, nudes, portraits, interiors, landscapes, landscapes with figures, urban landscapes, gardens, waterscapes, seascapes, still-lifes, flowers. Decorative panels, designs for stained glass.

Maurice Robert Savary was a pupil of Nicolas Untersteller and Maurice Brianchon at the École des Beaux-Arts, Paris, from 1940 to 1949. He spent time in Madrid from 1948 to 1949, then went to Italy, returning with the Prix de Rome. He was then appointed a professor at the École des Beaux-Arts, Rouen. From 1957 he lived in Paris and passed most of his summers in Collioure. He won a number of awards, including: 1950, the First Grand Prix de Rome; 1948, the Casa Velázquez prize, Madrid; 1957, the international prize at the Menton Biennale; 1975, gold medal at the Salon des artistes Français, Paris; 1982, medal at the Academie des Beaux-Arts Institut de France; 1985, silver medal at the Salon de la Marine, Paris, and a gold medal two years later....

Article

German, 18th century, male.

Died 18 August 1751, in Ludwigsburg (Baden-Württemberg).

Painter, watercolourist, illustrator. Flowers, fruit.

A horticulturist himself, August Sievert painted illustrations for books on horticulture.

Innsbruck (Tiroler Landesmus. Ferdinandeum): Flowers

Ludwigsburg (Städtisches Mus.): Flowers

Versailles, 25 Oct 1970: Floral Composition...

Article

Russian, 19th century, male.

Born 26 October 1842, in Luibez (Cherepovets district, Novgorod); died 13 April 1904, in Port Arthur (now Lushun, China).

Painter, designer, illustrator, writer. Historical subjects, military subjects, battles, genre scenes, portraits, figures, interiors with figures, church interiors, landscapes, townscapes, seascapes, architectural views, ruins, gardens, animals, birds, costume studies...

Article

( Reijmert )

(b The Hague, Jan 12, 1860; d Santpoort, June 25, 1937).

Dutch painter, draughtsman and illustrator . He first trained as a landscape gardener in Amsterdam. In 1878–9, however, he received lessons in painting from the cattle painter Dirk van Lokhorst (1818–93) and he was working in Drenthe, Gelderland and North Brabant. During that time he also received tuition from the marine painter Jacob Eduard van Heemskerck van Beest (1828–94). Wenckebach lived and worked in Utrecht from 1880 to 1886, in Amsterdam until 1898 and thereafter in Santpoort.

Wenckebach’s preference was for traditional genres such as land-, river- and townscapes; in the latter, his drawings of views of old Amsterdam in particular are well known. In his style of painting and choice of subject-matter, he showed himself to be a late follower of the Hague school . Through a number of publishers he received many commissions as an illustrator and designer of books. In this field he collaborated on, among other things, the Verkade albums, a large series devoted to the history and nature of the Netherlands, and various children’s books. He is, however, particularly well known for his work for the ...