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Article

Claude Laroche

(b Paris, Nov 9, 1812; d Chatou, Aug 2, 1884).

French architect and restorer. He was the son of a Neo-classical architect of the same name (1783–1868), who was a pupil of Charles Percier and architect to the département of Charente. The younger Paul Abadie began studying architecture in 1832 by joining the atelier of Achille Leclère and then entered the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in 1835. While he was following this classical training, he participated in the rediscovery of the Middle Ages by going on archaeological trips and then, from 1844, in his capacity as attaché to the Commission des Monuments Historiques. He undertook his first restoration work at Notre-Dame de Paris, under the direction of Jean-Baptiste-Antoine Lassus and Viollet-le-Duc. Abadie was appointed deputy inspector at Notre-Dame in 1845, and in 1848, when the department responsible for diocesan buildings was created, he was appointed architect to the dioceses of Périgueux, Angoulême and Cahors. He subsequently completed about 40 restoration projects, mainly on Romanesque churches in Charente, in the Dordogne and the Gironde, and as a diocesan architect he was put in charge of two large cathedrals in his district: St Pierre d’Angoulême and St Front de Périgueux. In the former he undertook a huge programme of ‘completion’, returning to a stylistic unity that was in line with current episcopal policy (...

Article

Italian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Painter, art restorer. Frescoes.

In 1860, while working on the Chapel of Castel-Capuano, Abate discovered and restored the frescoes so admired today in the great hall of the Court of Appeal in Naples.

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 29 May 1799, in Paris.

Engraver (burin).

A pupil of Guérin and Oortman and a prominent engraver during the Restoration and the reign of Louis-Philippe, Pierre Michel Adam taught engraving at the Institut Royal des Sourds-Muets (Royal Institute for the Deaf). Among his prolific output, perhaps the best-known works are portraits engraved between ...

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Rome.

Sculptor. Monuments.

Taught at the Accademia di San Luca in Rome and was responsible chiefly for the restoration of ancient monuments and sculptures. He was known still to be alive in 1807. In 1780 he was commissioned by Catherine the Great of Russia to sculpt the tomb of Raffael Mengs in St Peter's, Rome....

Article

Italian, 19th century, male.

Born 1820; died 1889.

Sculptor (wood).

Agostino Allegro's best works include his restoration of the stalls at the cathedral of Genoa and a wardrobe at the Royal Castle of Turin.

Article

Swiss, 19th century, male.

Born 12 April 1842, in Sachseln.

Draughtsman, calligrapher, architect.

Anderhalden supervised various restoration works in Sarnen and the construction of the church of Rickenbach.

Article

Lucília Verdelho da Costa and Sandro Callerio

(b Lisbon, Aug 26, 1839; d Genoa, Nov 30, 1915).

Portuguese painter, architect and restorer, active in Italy. He came from a middle-class family with trading interests in Italy. In 1854 Andrade went to Genoa, and friendships there with such artists as Tammar Luxoro (1824–99) led him to study painting with Alexandre Calame and later to study architecture at the Accademia Ligustica di Belle Arti. He travelled widely, and in Italy he came into contact with Antonio Fontanesi and Carlo Pittura (1835/6–91), with whom he became one of the most active painters of the Scuola di Rivara. According to Telamaro Signorini, Andrade was among the painters who frequented the Caffè Michelangiolo in Florence. The influence of the macchiaioli painters is also evident from 1863 in his paintings, especially in Return from the Woods at Dusk (1869; Genoa, Mus. Accad. Ligustica B.A.)

Lucília Verdelho da Costa

Andrade’s work represents a transition from the Romantic school of Calame to the Naturalism of the Barbizon school. His landscapes show careful observation of nature. The locations in northern Italy seem to have been chosen for their melancholy and serenity, as in the landscapes of Fontanesi. Andrade’s pastoral scenes at dawn or dusk are seen through morning mists or against sunsets, or they depict uninhabited countryside. Most of these works, for example ...

Article

Austrian, 19th century, male.

Born 5 January 1849, in Innsbruck.

Painter, watercolourist, art restorer. Religious subjects, portraits. Church decoration.

Resident in Bozen, South Tyrol (now Bolzano, Italy), Cajus d'Andrea did his artistic training under Professor Ludwig Seitz in Rome, and also worked in Florence. He visited several cities in Italy during his study tours, notably Venice, Milan, Siena, Verona and Assisi. Eventually he became a Franciscan monk....

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Naples.

Sculptor.

Records of the Bourbon court for 1791 list him as a 'marbler'. He is known to have worked from 1799 to 1805 on the restoration of sculptures uncovered during archaeological excavations.

Article

(b Pieve Santo Stefano, nr Arezzo, May 13, 1836; d Florence, Sept 12, 1922).

Italian dealer, restorer, collector and painter . From 1854 he trained as a painter at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence, executing such works as France Succouring Italy during the War of 1859 (1859–60; Impruneta, Villa Triboli). During the 1870s he began acquiring important works of art and became known as a notable dealer in Italian Old Master paintings, sculpture and objets d’art. He often obtained works of impeccable provenance, such as Arnolfo di Cambio’s marble figures for the ancient façade of Florence Cathedral, which included the Nativity, Pope Boniface VIII (both c. 1296–1300; Florence, Mus. Opera Duomo) and Death of the Virgin (c. 1296–1300; destr., fragments in Berlin, Bodemus.; plaster copy, executed by Bardini before the sale to Berlin, in Florence, Mus. Opera Duomo). An extensive range of significant works dating from approximately the 12th century to the 16th passed through his possession, entering major museums and private collections, including numerous Italian bronze statuettes, many of which were acquired by ...

Article

Italian, 19th century, male.

Born to a family originally from Busseto (Emilia-Romagna).

Painter, art restorer.

Barezzi is credited with having developed a process for transferring mural frescoes to wood. He may well be the same artist as the Swiss fresco painter Barozzi de Brissago, who restored paintings in the Chapel of Sempach in ...

Article

(b Sarrebourg [now Saarburg, Germany], Oct 14, 1834; d Paris, Feb 28, 1915).

French architect, restorer, teacher and writer. His architectural training began in 1854 in the studio of Henri Labrouste and then, when it was disbanded in 1856, in that of Viollet-le-Duc, which had been opened largely at Baudot’s request. His academic training was limited to a brief period (1856–7) at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris. From 1856 until the death of Viollet-le-Duc in 1879 Baudot’s life was that of a disciple, first as a student and later as a collaborator on restoration work (especially at Notre-Dame in Paris and the cathedral of Clermont-Ferrand). This patronage, while provoking strong antagonism from certain quarters, made it easy for him to enter professional life. Between 1869 and 1872 Baudot, possibly supported by Viollet-le-Duc who sat on the panel of judges, won first prize in three competitions for new churches: at Rambouillet (built in 1869), Levallois (1870; unexecuted) and Grenoble (...

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Born 1831, in Haddington (East Lothian), Scotland; died 31 March 1909, in Edinburgh.

Painter, watercolourist, art restorer. Landscapes.

William Beattie-Brown exhibited at the Royal Academy and at the New Water-Colour Society in London from 1863 to 1888. He was elected an Associate of the Royal Scottish Academy in ...

Article

Philippe Durey

(b Le Havre, June 21, 1750; d Paris, April 15, 1818).

French sculptor, draughtsman and engraver. He arrived in Paris in 1765 to become a pupil of Augustin Pajou. Although he never won the Prix de Rome, he appears to have travelled to Rome in the early 1770s. About 1780 or 1781 he was involved in the decoration of Claude-Nicolas Ledoux’s Hôtel Thélusson, Paris. From 1784 to 1785 he carried out work at the château of Compiègne, including the decoration of the Salle des Gardes, where his bas-reliefs illustrating the Battles of Alexander (in situ) pleasantly combine a Neo-classical clarity of composition with a virtuosity and animation that are still Rococo in spirit.

Beauvallet was approved (agréé) by the Académie Royale in 1789. During the French Revolution he was a passionate republican and presented plaster busts of Marat and of Chalier (1793–4; both destr.) to the Convention. He was briefly imprisoned after the fall of Robespierre in ...

Article

Italian, 19th century, male.

Born 1818, in Piove di Sacco near Padua; died 1883.

Painter, watercolourist, art restorer. Genre scenes.

Completed his studies at the academy of fine arts in Venice. Bedini painted numerous simple yet original compositions and was a skilful restorer of works by Old Masters....

Article

Amedeo Bellini

(b Milan, Nov 13, 1854; d Rome, Aug 8, 1933).

Italian architect, teacher, restorer and writer. He attended both the Politecnico in Milan and the Accademia di Brera, studying as a pupil of Camillo Boito. He graduated in 1875 and the following year enrolled at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, where he attended Jean-Louis Pascal’s atelier, and came into contact with Charles Garnier, Gabriel-Jean-Antoine Davioud and Théodore Ballu. He also cultivated the interest in engraving that he had acquired under the painter Luigi Conconi and exhibited at the Salon of 1877. In 1880 Beltrami won the competition organized by the municipality of Milan for a monument (unexecuted) to the anti-Austrian uprising of 1848 and was appointed to the chair in architecture at the Accademia di Brera. The following year he also shared first prize with Carlo Ferrario (1833–1907) in a competition organized by the Accademia di Brera for a new façade for the cathedral. Between 1880 and 1886...

Article

Belgian, 19th century, male.

Born 1782, in Antwerp; died 1854, in Brussels.

Painter. Landscapes.

Orientalism.

Benoit was a picture restorer by trade. He travelled extensively from Guiana to the Far East and returned with a number of illustrations of his trip. He was famous for his ...

Article

Belgian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 18 June 1876, in Mechelen; died 2 October 1953, in Limoges, France.

Painter, enameller, art restorer. Portraits.

Philippe Victor van den Bergh was a student at the academy of fine arts in Mechelen in 1890. He entered the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in ...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 17 January 1866, in Vienne; died 7 January 1931, in Boulogne-sur-Seine.

Painter, sculptor, draughtsman, watercolourist, illustrator. Figures. Monuments.

The son of a stonemason employed on the restoration of monuments in the Rhône valley, Joseph Antoine Bernard accompanied his father from the age of 12, learning the art of direct stone-carving which he was subequently to practice throughout his life. He studied at the École des Beaux-Arts in Lyons, and under Pierre Jules Cavelier at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris for a six-month period in ...

Article

Belgian, 19th century, male.

Born 1 March 1826, in St-Denis; died 19 March 1892, in St-Denis.

Sculptor.

Bertin studied at the academy in Antwerp from 1842 to 1848. He then took up residence in Liège and participated in 1866 in the restoration of the basilica of Onze Lieve Vrouw at Tongeren, where he was also responsible for the statue of ...