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Rory Spence and Ursula Hoff

Australian family of artists and writers founded by the landscape painters Arthur Merric Boyd (1862–1940) and his wife Emma Minnie Boyd (1858–1936). Their children included (William) Merric Boyd (1888–1959), who founded Australia’s first significant studio pottery at Murrumbeena with his wife, the ceramicist Doris Lucy Eleanor Boyd (c. 1883–1960); and (Theodore) Penleigh Boyd (1890–1923), who was a noted landscape painter and etcher. Penleigh’s son (1) Robin Boyd became a well-known architect and writer, who helped to develop a more critical approach to Australian architecture and culture. Merric and Doris had five children, all of whom became artists and were at some stage involved with ceramic art. Among them were Lucy Boyd (b 1915); Guy Boyd (1923–88), who was also a sculptor; David Boyd (b 1925); and Mary Boyd (b 1926), who married John Perceval (...

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Australian, 20th century, male.

Active from 1959 active in England.

Born 1920, in Murrumbeena, near Melbourne; died 24 April 1999.

Painter, pastellist, lithographer, potter. Allegorical subjects, landscapes. Designs for tapestries.

Antipodean Group.

Arthur Merrick Bloomfield Boyd was born into a family three generations of which were potters and painters. He is said to have received advice from his grandfather, landscape painter Arthur Merric Boyd Sr. His father, Merric Boyd, was a potter. Arthur Boyd himself started very young to draw, paint and model. From 1930 he was already painting landscapes and portraits. In the middle of the 1940s he was active as a ceramicist. He moved more or less definitively to England in 1959, joining Sidney Nolan and the group of Australian emigrants....

Article

Australian, 20th century, male.

Born 23 August 1924, in Murrumbeena; died 10 November 2011, Sydney.

Painter, potter. Genre scenes, scenes with figures, landscapes, portraits, allegorical subjects.

Antipodean group.

Boyd was the son of William Merric Boyd and the brother of Arthur Merric Boyd and Guy Martin à Beckett Boyd. His works portrays a variety of everyday activities in Australia, such as working, for example collecting wood, or relaxation and games. He was also a potter....

Article

Paula Furby

(b Mount Barker, March 24, 1911; d Adelaide, May 15, 1995).

Australian painter, printmaker, potter, teacher and art critic. Chapman studied at the South Australian School of Arts and Crafts (1928–32) and became a fellow of the Royal South Australian Society of Arts (RSASA) while still a student. Ivor Hele (1912–93) was a notable influence on her and when he became a war artist, Chapman taught his life-drawing and painting class at the school from 1940–41. From 1942–5 Chapman served in the Australian Women’s Army in army education in Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney. In 1945 in Sydney she married the artist James Cant (1911–82). With Cant she was a co-founder of the Studio of Realist Art (SORA). While supporting realist artists as secretary–organizer of SORA, Cant experimented with abstraction and surrealist automatism. She exhibited abstracts works with the Contemporary Art Society in 1947–8.

From 1949–55 Chapman and Cant lived in England, but she did little painting, being then and later the main breadwinner in her marriage. They returned to Australia and settled in Adelaide in ...

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British (?), 19th – 20th century, female.

Born 23 November 1872.

Miniaturist, watercolourist.

Marion Clayton-Jones exhibited at the Royal Academy in London. She may be the same as the Australian portrait and flower painter Marion Jones.

Article

Australian, 20th century, female.

Active in France from the 1930s.

Born 1885 or 1887 according to some sources, in Kempsey (New South Wales); died 4 September 1951, in Moly-Sabata in the village of Sablons, France.

Painter, ceramicist.

Anne Dangar was born in Sydney to an Irish Protestant family, and started her career as a teacher. She was profoundly affected by a visit to Paris in ...

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A. K. C. Petersen

(b Bromley, Kent, March 3, 1899; d Auckland, Feb 18, 1987).

English painter, sculptor, potter and teacher, active in New Zealand. He studied from 1919 to 1924 at the Royal College of Art in London, where he first became interested in the modern movement in painting and experimented with direct carving. In 1925 he emigrated to New Zealand to take up a position at the King Edward Technical College, Dunedin. There he proved an influential teacher. He established the Six and Four Art Club, partly in response to the English 7 & 5 Society, and inspired several students who were to become leading New Zealand painters, notably Colin McCahon and M. T. Woollaston.

Mostly small-scale, Field’s work was experimental and helped to free art in New Zealand from representational values. Paintings such as Christ at the Well of Samaria (1929; Wellington, Mus. NZ, Te Papa Tongarewa) were striking for their pure colour and pointillist brushwork. Carvings such as Wahine (...

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Australian, 19th – 20th century, female.

Born in Bendigo.

Painter. Portraits, flowers.

Marion Jones exhibited in Sydney, with the Royal Academy in London, and in Liverpool. She may be the artist also known as Marion Alexandra Clayton-Jones.

Melbourne

Sydney (National Academy)

Article

Australian, 20th century, female.

Painter, sculptor, potter.

Helen Marshall studied painting in Melbourne in the studio of George Bell, from 1947 to 1950. She has exhibited in Italy, France, Belgium and Australia since 1951. In 1966, a retrospective of her work was held at the Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels....

Article

Traudi Allen

(de Burgh)

(b Melbourne, Feb 1, 1923; d Melbourne, Oct 15, 2000).

Australian painter and potter. Perceval is best known as one of the Melbourne Angry Penguins, a group of artists who brought radical innovations of style and subject-matter to Australian painting in the 1940s. He first exhibited with the Contemporary Art Society in Melbourne in 1942 at the age of 19 and was praised by its then president, John Reed, in the art magazine Angry Penguins the following year. Along with his colleagues he established a new emphasis on the urban landscape, often at night (e.g. Negroes at Night, 1944; Canberra, Australian N.G.) via a highly expressive treatment of mythological, allegorical, and/or Old Master references in a local setting.

After meeting Arthur Boyd in 1941, he joined his household at Murrumbeena (then an outer hamlet of Melbourne), marrying Boyd’s sister, Mary, with whom he had four children. Perceval’s next phase included sombre-toned religious studies after Bruegel and a series of Quattrocento-inspired portraits begun while studying at the National Gallery School in Melbourne in ...

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Australian, 19th – 20th century, female.

Born 4 September 1881, in Glenelg (Adelaide); died 16 November 1956.

Painter, potter, engraver. Landscapes, still-lifes, figure compositions, flora and fauna.

Gladys Reynell studied painting at Margaret Rose Preston's studio in Adelaide, where fellow students included Bessie Davidson and Stella Bowen. In ...

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