1-9 of 9 results  for:

  • Ceramics and Pottery x
  • Eighteenth-Century Art x
Clear all

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Bohemia.

Died 1819.

Sculptor, potter, glassmaker.

Barthélemy Desprez started as a modeller at the Sèvres porcelain works. He founded and then ran the Nový Svet glassworks in Bohemia. Drawing his inspiration from ancient coins and medals, he produced a large number of ceramic cameos embedded in crystal, known in glassmaking as sulphides....

Article

Damie Stillman

Architectural and decorative arts style that flourished in the USA from shortly after the acknowledgement of independence in the Treaty of Paris (1783) until c. 1820. The term is derived from the period surrounding the creation of the federal constitution in 1787 and was in use in a political sense by that year. Essentially it was a form of ...

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1769, in Nuremberg; died 18 January 1847, in Munich.

Painter (including porcelain), glass painter.

Michael Frank worked for the Bavarian court and the Prince of Wallenstein. His works include the stained glass windows of Ratisbonne Cathedral.

Article

Gordon Campbell

English porcelain and glass painter. He was the son of a porcelain painter of the same name. James Giles became an independent painter in 1749, and decorated white porcelain, mostly made at Worcester but also made by other factories. His work is characterized by bold design, vivid colours, high-quality gilding and delicate painting in gold or enamels of floral or classical motifs. He also painted glass, specializing in opaque blue and white glass decorated in gilt....

Article

Georg Germann, Melissa Ragain and Pippa Shirley

Term applied to a style of architecture and the decorative arts inspired by the Gothic architecture of medieval Europe. It has been particularly widely applied to churches but has also been used to describe castellated mansions, collegiate buildings, and houses. The Gothic Revival has also been described by many scholars as a movement, rather than style, for in the mid-19th century it was associated with and propagated by religious and political faith. From a hesitant start in the mid-18th century in England and Scotland, in the 19th century it became one of the principal styles of building throughout the world and continued in some huge projects until well into the 20th century (e.g. ...

Article

Term used for a manifestation of the Neo-classical style initiated in the decorative arts of France during the Second Empire (1852–71) of Napoleon III and his wife, the Empress Eugénie. Based on the standard repertory of Greco-Roman ornament, it combined elements from the Adam, Louis XVI and Egyptian styles with a range of motifs inspired by discoveries at Pompeii, where excavations had begun in ...

Article

Flemish School, 18th century, male.

Active in Mons.

Glass painter, potter.

Article

Gordon Campbell

Type of German drinking vessel made from the 16th to 18th centuries, usually in earthenware (a Ringkrug) but sometimes in glass (a Ringflasche), in which the body takes the form of a hollow ring.

Article

Bruce Tattersall

German ceramics and glass manufacturers. In 1748 François Boch (1695–1754) founded a small factory for the production of faience fine (a lead-glazed earthenware) at Audun-le-Tiche in the Meurthe-et-Moselle region of France, near Luxembourg. In 1766 a second factory was opened at Septfontaines in Luxembourg, and more diversified wares were produced. In the early 19th century Boch’s son ...