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Article

Agano  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese region in Buzen Province (now part of Fukuoka Prefect.), northern Kyushu, where stonewares were manufactured at various sites from c. 1600 (see also Japan, §IX, 3, (i), (d)).

The first potter to make Agano ware was the Korean master Chon’gye (Jap. Sonkai; ...

Article

Arita  

Hiroko Nishida

Region in Japan, now part of Saga Prefecture, and the name of a type of porcelain first produced there during the early Edo period (1600–1868). The ware was originally known as Imari yaki (‘Imari ware’) because it was shipped from the port of Imari (Saga Prefect.). During the Meiji period (...

Article

Gordon Campbell

English painter of pottery and porcelain and the proprietor of a China decorating firm. In 1834 he began to work for Copeland, and during this period he may have developed the formula for Parian ware. He is given credit for its invention in the catalogue of the Great Exhibition of ...

Article

Hélène Guéné-Loyer

French ceramics manufacturer. He was initially a physics and chemistry teacher and in 1889 visited the Exposition Universelle in Paris, where he saw Chinese porcelain with opaque glazes that enhanced the ground colours and emphasized the forms of the body. He transferred this technique to stoneware, a less expensive material that has the advantage of being able to withstand great variations of temperature when fired. In this way, with one type of ceramic body, it is possible to vary the degree to which enamels are fused in order to obtain dull, oily or crystalline finishes in the greatest possible variation of colours....

Article

Bizen  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese centre of ceramics production. High-fired ceramic wares were manufactured from the end of the 12th century in and around the village of Inbe, Bizen Province (now Okayama Prefect.). This region had been a centre for manufacturing Sue-style stonewares and Haji-style earthenwares from the 6th century ...

Article

Lillian B. Miller

American businessman, collector, patron and dealer. He began collecting art in 1869 with paintings by American Hudson River school artists and conventional European works, Chinese porcelain, antique pottery and 17th- and 18th-century English furniture. By 1883 his taste had focused entirely on American works, especially on paintings by ...

Article

Hiroko Nishida

Japanese ceramicist. He was the second-generation head of the Dōhachi family. His father, Dōhachi, son of a retainer of the Kameyama fief in the province of Ise, established a kiln at Awataguchi in Kyoto in the Hōreki era (1751–64), thereby forming his own school, and later assumed the name Takahashi Dōhachi. Along with ...

Article

Hiroko Nishida

Japanese potter. He is thought to have been the grandson of Chinese immigrants who came to Japan to escape the turbulence at the end of the Ming period (1368–1644). He was adopted into the Okuda family of wealthy pawnbrokers, who patronized the Buddhist temple Kenninji, where, according to one account, Eisen lodged for a time. The temple was famous as a centre of Chinese learning, and it was probably this contact that stimulated Eisen’s first attempts at making Chinese-style ceramics. By the 1780s he was producing copies of late Ming-period enamelled porcelain called ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Chinese porcelain jar with an ovoid body and a wide mouth with a lid, manufactured in mid-19th century China for the export market. The jars may have been used to hold preserved ginger; it was believed by purchasers in the West that the jars were used to contain wedding or New Year gifts, and that the jars were intended to be returned to the giver after the contents had been eaten....

Article

Hagi  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in Japan. High-fired Hagi ware was manufactured from the early 17th century in Nagato Province (now Yamaguchi Prefect.; see Japan, §IX, 3, (ii)). The first Hagi potters, the brothers Yi Suk-wang and Yi Kyŏng (Jap. Sakamoto Sukehachi), were brought to Japan from Korea during ...

Article

Hiroko Nishida and Andrew Maske

Japanese ceramicist and member of the Eiraku family. At the age of 13 he was adopted by Nishimura Ryōzen, the tenth-generation head of a family of doburo (earthenware braziers) makers for the tea ceremony. In 1827 he was invited to Kii Province (now Wakayama Prefect.) to produce porcelain for the local daimyo, from whom he received the right to use a silver seal bearing the name Eiraku. He obtained national recognition for his ...

Article

Phylis Floyd

French term used to describe a range of European borrowings from Japanese art. It was coined in 1872 by the French critic, collector and printmaker Philippe Burty ‘to designate a new field of study—artistic, historic and ethnographic’, encompassing decorative objects with Japanese designs (similar to 18th-century ...

Article

Hiroko Nishida

Japanese porcelain made in the Arita district of Hizen Province (now Saga Prefect.). Sakaida Kinzaemon (later Kakiemon; 1596–1666) is traditionally credited with making the first porcelain in Japan in 1643 at the family kiln in Nangawara, but recent archaeological excavations have shown that ‘Kakiemon’ wares were widely produced in the region during the early Edo period (...

Article

Karatsu  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in Japan. High-fired ceramic ware was manufactured from the late 16th century in kilns (119 identified by 1986) located in and around present-day Karatsu (Kyushu, Hizen Prov., now Saga Prefect.). Geographical and historical circumstances destined Karatsu to be the meeting-place of the advanced ceramic technology of Chosŏn-period (...

Article

Hiroko Nishida

Japanese family of ceramicists. They were active in Kyoto. The first-generation head, Kinkōzan Gen’emon, established a kiln at Awataguchi in the Shōhō era (1644–8). At first the family produced utilitarian objects, but later they made teabowls for the tea ceremony (chadō), particularly of the type known as ...

Article

Kutani  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in Japan. Porcelain was produced from the mid-17th century at Kutani (now in Ishikawa Prefect.). The term Old Kutani (Ko Kutani) is frequently applied to what has long been believed to be the earliest wares, typically large porcelain dishes decorated with bold designs in overglaze enamels, with green, purple and yellow predominating (...

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

American ceramic factory. Homer Laughlin first produced white ironstone in 1873 with his brother Shakespeare, as Laughlin Brothers. The partnership was dissolved in 1877, and Homer Laughlin established the Homer Laughlin China Co. Semi-vitreous dinnerware made for hotels was added as a major product in the 1890s, and in ...

Article

Kathy Niblett

English potter and writer. Until he was ten years old he lived in the Far East, which had a most powerful influence on his life and work. In 1903–4 he studied drawing with Henry Tonks at the Slade School of Art, London. He kept a death-bed promise to his father to train to work in the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, but left after nine months and in ...

Article

Mokubei  

Japanese, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1767, in Kyoto; died 1833, in Kyoto.

Painter, potter.

Mokubei was a potter as well as a painter and a lover of illuminated art. An aesthetic intellectual evolving within an intellectual elite steeped in Chinese culture, he was the elder son of a patron of a restaurant or brothel in Kyoto. He was attracted to the arts at a very young age and left his father’s household aged 15....

Article

Kōzō Sasaki and Hiroko Nishida

Japanese potter, painter and scholar. He was born into the Kiya family of restaurateurs and adopted the surname Aoki only after becoming a painter. Mokubei, one of his many artist’s names, was created by combining the Chinese characters for ‘tree’ and ‘rice’ (a character anagram of his given name Yasohachi). His most familiar studio name (...