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Oldest and largest photography museum in the United States, located in Rochester, NY. Since it opened its doors to the public in November 1949, George Eastman House has played a pivotal role in shaping and expanding the field of American photography. George Eastman, founder of Eastman Kodak Company, never knew his home would become a museum; he bequeathed the mansion where he lived from 1905 until 1932 to the University of Rochester to serve as the residence of its president. In 1946 a board of trustees was formed to establish George Eastman House as an independent, non-profit museum, a memorial to Eastman and his advancements in photographic technology.

Working under director Oscar Solbert, a retired US Army general and former Kodak executive, was the museum’s first curator, Beaumont Newhall. Newhall transformed the museum from one primarily concerned with the technical applications of photography to one emphasizing its artistic development. The museum became an international centre of scholarship, and in ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Active in Philadelphia.

Born 18 February 1846, in Philadelphia; died 1929.

Painter, art restorer. Still-lifes.

George Thomson Hobbs was a pupil of Bouguereau and Tony Robert-Fleury in Paris.

New York, 19 March 1969: Still-life, USD 2,500

New York, 18 Nov 1976...

Article

Ronald J. Onorato

(Morrison)

(b Hartford, CT, Nov 12, 1864; d Wickford, RI, Jan 1, 1943).

American architect, preservationist, and author. Isham was one of the earliest American architects to specialize in the restoration of colonial American structures. He worked on a large number of 17th- and 18th-century structures in New England, wrote several major works on American architecture, conducted archaeological site work, and also designed new, mostly residential buildings.

Most of his private and professional life was spent in Rhode Island with its large number of existing colonial buildings. The state’s extensive collection of early structures influenced his career, as did other Rhode Island architects who helped generate the Colonial Revival style nationally such as Edmund R. Willson (1856–1906), of the prominent Providence firm of Stone, Carpenter & Willson, with whom Isham trained in the late 1880s. About the same time, he received Bachelor and Master degrees from Brown University, and he married Elizabeth Barbour Ormsbee in 1895.

It is impossible to study colonial American architecture without encountering buildings that Isham restored. While some of his preservation methods and decisions have been superceded by more modern approaches and technologies, he notably produced scores of carefully measured drawings, which are still used by preservationists and historians today. His projects included such significant 17th- and 18th-century structures as Newport’s Colony House, Trinity Church, Redwood Library, and Wanton-Lyman-Allen house (all restored in the 1920s), the Stephen Hopkins House and University Hall at Brown University in Providence, Bishop Berkeley’s Whitehall in Middletown, the Eleazar Arnold House in Lincoln, and the Gilbert Stuart Birthplace in North Kingstown, all Rhode Island. His bibliography encompasses surveys of early Rhode Island and Connecticut homes, scholarly studies on specific buildings, such as the First Baptist Meeting House, Providence, and St Paul’s in Wickford and papers on individual architects such as John Holden Greene....

Article

Canadian, 19th century, male.

Born 10 March 1789, in Quebec; died 1855, in Quebec.

Painter, copyist, art restorer. Religious subjects, genre scenes, portraits, landscapes.

Joseph Légaré started his career as a copier of religious paintings and a restorer of pictures which he collected, notably canvases by Jean Louis Desjardins. He then started to paint portraits as well as Canadian and Native American scenes. He was best known as a portrait painter. He was also a teacher, and one of his pupils was Antoine Plamondon, another Quebec portrait painter. He was a political supporter of Louis Joseph Papineau and was arrested as a suspect after the Lower Canada rebellion in ...

Article

Louise Noelle

(b Tepic, Feb 26, 1853; d Mexico City, Jan 3, 1927).

Mexican architect, restorer, and teacher. After studying at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, he returned to Mexico in 1879 to practise as an architect–engineer and teach in the Escuela de Ingeniería and the Escuela de Arquitectura, Mexico City. As an architect his most notable project is the monument to Independence (1890–1910) on the Paseo de la Reforma, Mexico City, on which he collaborated with the sculptor Enrique Alciati. The slender column rises from a carefully worked base that includes sculptures of historical figures associated with the independence movement, topped by a gilded statue of a winged victory. The Teatro Juárez (1892–1903), Guanajuato, which has a Neo-classical exterior and a neo-Moorish interior, is a competently executed example of his eclecticism. Rivas Mercado also designed domestic buildings, including his own house (1898), Calle de Héroes, which has been poorly preserved, and that of the Macías family (...

Article

American, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active during the first half of the 19th century.

Born 1775, in Staffordshire, England.

Painter, art restorer. Landscapes.

Samuel Scarlett was a pupil of Nathan T. Fielding in London around 1795. He worked in Bath (Avon), England until 1817, then emigrated to the USA and went to work in Philadelphia. He exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and was a curator there ...

Article

Brazilian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in France.

Born 16 October 1874, in Rio de Janeiro; died after 1929.

Painter, illustrator.

Gaston Simoes de Fonseca settled in Paris and was a draughtsman and restorer in the Louvre museum. He exhibited work in Paris at the Salon des Artistes Français, where he won a mention in ...

Article

Peter L. Laurence

Although the theory and practice of renovating cities is ancient, and although the term is still used to refer to similar practices today, “urban renewal” typically refers to the large-scale, federally funded redevelopment projects that took place in US cities in the 1950s and 1960s. Such projects wrought dramatic physical transformations and caused controversial social upheaval. Urban renewal in this sense came into being with the US Housing Act of 1954, although it evolved out of a history of government-funded slum clearance and housing project construction dating back to the 1930s. Following two decades of slum clearance and model housing projects including First Houses (1935), Williamsburg Houses (1937) and Stuyvesant Town (1947), all in New York, the US Housing Act of 1949 was signed into law with broad political support due to a national postwar housing shortage. As the immediate legislative predecessor of urban renewal legislation, the Housing Act of ...