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Article

(b Cologne, 1552; d Prague, March 4, 1615).

German painter and draughtsman, active also in Italy and Bohemia. One of the foremost painters of the circle gathered at the Prague court of Emperor Rudolf II (see Habsburg, House of family, §I, (10)), he synthesized Italian and Netherlandish influences in his portraits and erudite allegories.

Hans’s surname is derived from his father’s native town. According to Karel van Mander, he probably studied c. 1567–73 with the portrait painter Georg Jerrigh, who had trained in Antwerp. Von Aachen subsequently became a member of the Cologne guild of painters. He travelled to Italy c. 1574, first working in Venice as a copyist and for the painter Gaspar Rem (1542–1615/17), before going in 1575 to Rome, where he copied antique sculptures and the works of Italian masters; he also painted an Adoration of the Shepherds for the church of Il Gesù in Rome (1580s; untraced, but known from an engraving (...

Article

Sophie Page

Astrology is the art of predicting events on earth as well as human character and disposition from the movements of the planets and fixed stars. Medieval astrology encompassed both general concepts of celestial influence, and the technical art of making predictions with horoscopes, symbolic maps of the heavens at particular moments and places constructed from astronomical information. The scientific foundations of the art were developed in ancient Greece, largely lost in early medieval Europe and recovered by the Latin West from Arabic sources in the 12th and 13th centuries. Late medieval astrological images were successfully Christianized and were adapted to particular contexts, acquired local meanings and changed over time.

Astrology developed into a scientific branch of learning in ancient Greece, but because of the opposition of the Church Fathers it was transmitted to early medieval Europe in only fragmentary form in technically unsophisticated textbooks and popular divinatory genres. Literary and scientific texts provided more general ideas about the nature and attributes of the planets which were influential on later iconography. The first significant astrological images appear in 11th-century illustrated astronomical texts (e.g. London, BL, Cotton MS. Tiberius BV), which were acquired and produced by monasteries to aid with time-keeping and the construction of the Christian calendar....

Article

Libby Karlinger Escobedo

Illustrated manuscript (Chantilly, Mus. Condé, MS. 597/1424) of the Inferno by Dante Alighieri, probably made in Pisa c. 1345. Dante’s Inferno is the first part of his Divine Comedy, written sometime between 1308 and 1321, in which Dante himself, guided by the Roman poet Virgil, travels through the nine circles of Hell, encountering a variety of notable historical figures guilty of the various sins associated with each successive level. The many surviving manuscripts attest to the popularity of the text; more than 600 copies survive from the 14th century alone, including the Chantilly manuscript.

The Chantilly manuscript contains the Inferno as well as a Latin commentary on the text by Guido da Pisa. Most of the manuscript’s 55 miniatures accompany the commentary, though their iconography is drawn from the Inferno itself. The Chantilly manuscript is among the earliest illustrated copies of the Inferno and the only known illustrated copy of Guido da Pisa’s commentary. The manuscript includes the arms of the ...

Article

Dutch, 17th century, male.

Died between 1658 and 1661, in Amsterdam.

Painter, art dealer.

In 1640, Jan Dammeron worked in Amsterdam.

Article

Ismael Gutiérrez Pastor

(b Valladolid, 1586; d Valladolid, Dec 1660).

Spanish painter and collector. He was the son and pupil of the painter Pedro Díaz Minaya (c. 1555–1624), who worked in Valladolid, the location of Philip III’s court from 1600 to 1606. For more than 50 years, Diego Valentín Díaz was Valladolid’s most important painter, producing a great number of religious works and portraits containing colourful imagery; many of these are widely dispersed in collections and churches throughout Spain. Although his early works were executed in a style of late Mannerism, he gradually introduced more naturalistic elements, resulting in paintings with precise drawing, a varied but rather dull colouring, an emphasis on decorative details and a sweet expression on the faces of his religious figures. His earliest surviving works are the altarpiece (1608) of the convent of S Catalina, Valladolid, and the Martyrdom of St Sebastian and the Penitent St Peter (both 1610; Zamora, Hosp. Encarnación). In ...

Article

Ismael Gutiérrez Pastor

(b El Escorial, Madrid, 1590; d Madrid, 1679).

Spanish painter and collector of Flemish descent. He was the grandson of Anton van Wingaerde and was trained in Madrid in the family tradition. After the death of Bartolomé González in c. 1627–8, he aspired to occupy the vacant post of Pintor del Rey, having served as Arquero de Corps since 1611. In spite of his lengthy career as a painter, his work is scarce. In 1620 a portrait of Philip III (untraced) is documented. Among his other works are SS Isidore, Teresa, Philip Neri, Ignatius and Francis Xavier (untraced) and a series of six canvases (e.g. St Mark, 1627) in the chapel of Mosén Rubí de Bracamonte, Ávila. A portrait of Doña María Gasca de la Vega (Pastrana, Colegiata), depicting the sitter kneeling, was also painted in the 1620s; its horizontal format is similar to the Mater Dolorosa with St John and the Magdalene (1645; Madrid, Convento de la Encarnación). Two dated portraits survive of male members of the Ibarra family (both ...

Article

Dutch, 16th – 17th century, male.

Painter, collector.

Ferreris, who lived in Leiden, was a pupil of Antonio Moro and of Peeter and Frans Pourbus. His collection of paintings included works by Hans Holbein, Lucas van Leyden, Cornelis van Haarlem and others.

Article

Oliver Millar, Diana Dethloff and Lin Barton

(b Soest, Westphalia, Sept 14, 1618; d London, Nov 30, 1680).

Dutch painter, draughtsman, and collector, active in England. By a combination of ability and good fortune, he rapidly established himself in mid-17th-century London as the natural successor in portrait painting to Anthony van Dyck. Between van Dyck’s death in 1641 and the emergence of William Hogarth in the 1730s, Lely and his successor, Godfrey Kneller, were the leading portrait painters in England. After the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, Lely dominated the artistic scene, and his evocation of the court of Charles II is as potent and enduring as was van Dyck’s of the halcyon days before the English Civil War. Although Lely’s reputation was seriously damaged by portraits that came from his studio under his name but without much of his participation, his development of an efficient studio practice is of great importance in the history of British portrait painting. The collection of pictures, drawings, prints, and sculpture he assembled was among the finest in 17th-century England after the dispersal of the legendary royal collections....

Article

Edgar Peters Bowron

(b Florence, Nov 17, 1666; d Rome, June 17, 1724).

Italian painter, draughtsman, collector, dealer and teacher. He was one of the most significant and influential artists active in Rome in the first quarter of the 18th century. The son of a Florentine artisan, he trained in his native city under the direction of Anton Domenico Gabbiani and thoroughly absorbed the style of Pietro da Cortona and his late Baroque successors. In 1690 he left Florence for Rome, where in 1692 he made his artistic début in the annual St Bartholomew’s Day exhibition with a monumental painting of God Cursing Cain after the Murder of Abel (Kedleston Hall, Derbys). He quickly rose to prominence and in 1694 was elected to the Accademia di S Luca. He produced a variety of works for the leading Roman families—the Torri, Colonna, Pallavicini, Barberini and Odescalchi—and enjoyed the patronage of Pope Clement XI, Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni, Cardinal Carlo Agosto Fabbroni and Padre Antonin Cloche, Master General of the Dominican Order. He was invited to participate in the most important papal commission to painters in Rome in the first quarter of the 18th century, that for the series of Old Testament prophets above the nave arcade in S Giovanni in Laterano; his contribution was ...

Article

(bapt Seville, March 3, 1627; d Seville, May 9, 1679).

Spanish patron, painter and writer. He was the most remarkable of the patrons of the Baroque period in Seville. He came from a wealthy family, and his father owned an unremarkable collection of paintings. Mañara was a painter of some ability; his works were in several Sevillian collections. He led a dissolute existence until a series of family deaths prompted him to repent and adopt a devout and ascetic way of life. In 1662 he joined the Hermandad de la Santa Caridad, a Sevillian confraternity dedicated to providing Christian burial for criminals condemned to death. The following year he was elected head of the brotherhood, retaining the post until his death. Under Mañara’s leadership the brotherhood became a dominant spiritual and social force in caring for the sick and poor of Seville. He oversaw all aspects of the society’s activities, from writing the new rule to raising funds for new buildings. He paid close attention to the completion and decoration of the church in the Hospital de la Caridad (...

Article

Filippo Pedrocco

(b Verona, April 30, 1663; d Verona, Jan 27, 1738).

Italian painter and agent. He is traditionally believed to have trained with Biagio Falcieri (1628–1703). At the age of 17 he moved to Bologna, where he entered the workshop of Carlo Cignani. His first commission after his return to Verona was for the fresco decoration of the vault of S Domenico (1687), with scenes glorifying the saint, set in a quadratura framework by Carlo Tedesco. The style is heavily Baroque. In 1690–91 Marchesini painted a Jonah for S Niccolò, Verona; this remains within a Veronese tradition, whereas his Assumption of the Virgin for S Biagio (1692; Breonio, SS Marziale e Giovanni) and his Purification of the Virgin (1699; Verona, Pal. Scaligero, Notai Chapel) contain references to the Bolognese art of the Carracci.

In 1700 Marchesini moved to Venice, where he painted two works (untraced) for S Silvestro. He remained in Venice until 1737 and specialized in making small-scale copies of works by the Old Masters to decorate private houses, thereby imitating a wide variety of styles. His most memorable independent works are the two paintings of ...

Article

Dutch, 17th century, male.

Active in The Hague.

Born c. 1648.

Painter, collector.

Michelet was a pupil of Cornelis Monincx.

Article

Flemish School, 17th century, male.

Born 1 May 1602, in Antwerp; died 21 October 1653.

Painter, engraver, art dealer.

Recorded in the register of the Antwerp painters' guild as a pupil of Rubens, Jacques Moermans married Maria Schut in 1626 and qualified as master in ...

Article

Dutch, 17th century, male.

Born 1580, in Delft; died after 1620.

Painter, collector.

Montfoort was a pupil of Michiel Mierevelt.

Article

Dutch, 17th century, male.

Active in The Hague.

Died 1701.

Painter, collector. Still-lifes, birds.

In 1692 Jacobus de Neys was in the guild in The Hague. He went to Rome with Matheus Terwesten, and there used the surname 'De Genereuse'. He died while travelling. He is known for his still-lifes and paintings of birds....

Article

Jürgen Zimmer

(b Lugano, May 1, 1544; d Dresden, Sept 20, 1620).

Swiss sculptor, architect, painter, writer and collector, active in Germany. He was the son of Bernardinus Zamelinus Nosseni and Lucia Verda. His move to Dresden, via Florence, was organized by the intermediary Johann Albrecht von Sprintzenstein, and in 1575 he was appointed court sculptor, architect, painter and decorative artist on an annual salary of 400 taler. He was commissioned to exploit the sources of alabaster and marble in Saxony for the Electors Augustus and Christian I (reg 1586–91). In the following years Nosseni worked in the fields of sculpture and painting (including portraiture), made furniture and other stone and wooden objects for the royal art collection and designed buildings. He also devised triumphal processions, masked celebrations, allegorical plays and tournaments. The precious and semi-precious stones that he acquired were used for epitaphs, monuments, altars, sculptures and other works. It appears that he designed or conceived all these works but actually executed only a few of them. He created his own workshop, in which he employed Italian artists and craftsmen, whom he had engaged during a trip to Italy at the end of ...

Article

Dutch, 17th century, male.

Active in Rotterdam.

Born 1636.

Painter, art dealer. Portraits.

The Boymans Museum in Rotterdam holds a drawing by Willem Paets after Van Dyck.

Article

(bapt Bologna, June 28, 1529; d Bologna, June 3, 1592).

Italian painter, draughtsman, engraver and collector. His first biographer, Raffaele Borghini, records that he travelled to Rome with Giacomo Barozzi da Vignola, returned briefly to Bologna, then made a second visit to Rome and stayed with Taddeo Zuccaro. Documentary evidence attests to his presence in Rome in June 1551. By 1560 Passarotti was established in Bologna, where he opened a workshop and joined the Compagnia delle Quattro Arti. His activity in these years as a prestigious portraitist of popes (e.g. portrait of Pope Gregory XIII Boncompagni; c. 1572; Gotha, Mus. Nat.) and Roman cardinals, mentioned by Borghini, and his interest in anticaglie (miscellaneous antiquities), for example those sent to him from Rome on 9 September 1572, indicate his continued links with the capital.

The earliest documented Bolognese paintings by Passarotti show a pictorial language rooted in Emilian soil, clearly influenced by Correggio and Parmigianino, and his anatomical interest in powerful, acrobatic figures appears to be derived from the Bolognese works of Pellegrino Tibaldi. On the other hand, his minute, lively illustration of detail is reminiscent of the Flemish tradition. During his youthful visits to Rome, he may have encountered northern Romanists such as Marten de Vos, active there in the 1550s. In Bologna the painting school opened by Denys Calvaert in ...

Article

Antonio Vannugli

(b Rome, Jan 14, 1671; d La Granja de San Ildefonso, June 24, 1734).

Italian painter, draughtsman and architect. A pupil of Carlo Maratti, he is first documented in 1702, among the restorers of Raphael’s fresco decorations (1511–14) in the Vatican. His Tarquinius and Lucretia (c. 1705; Holkham Hall, Norfolk) has cold colours and unnatural gestures that recall Guido Reni. Appointed by Pope Clement XI, between 1710 and 1717 Procaccini supervised the tapestry factory in S Michele a Ripa: the Purification of the Virgin (Rome, Vatican, Consistory Hall) is the only extant tapestry made from a cartoon (untraced) by Maratti and an oil painting (untraced) by Procaccini. The Baptism of Cornelius Centurion (1711; Urbino, S Francesco) for the Baptism Chapel in St Peter’s, Rome, was previously attributed to Maratti or Giuseppe Bartolomeo Chiari, but Procaccini apparently based it on sketches supplied by Maratti, who also supervised and revised the work before it was displayed. Pope Pius V Triumphant over the Turks...

Article

Hans Vlieghe

(b Siegen, Westphalia, June 28, 1577; d Antwerp, May 30, 1640).

Flemish painter, draughtsman, and diplomat. He was the most versatile and influential Baroque artist of northern Europe in the 17th century. An educated and urbane member of the Antwerp patriciate, he was employed by the rulers of the southern Netherlands as their ambassador and became painter to the courts of Europe, producing magnificent cycles of allegorical painting glorifying his princely patrons. Rubens’s art blends features of the Italian High Renaissance, with which he became acquainted during a prolonged visit to Italy, with northern realism and a love of landscape, derived from Pieter Bruegel the elder. He had a deep knowledge and understanding of Classical art and literature and was unrivalled in his power to turn its most complex themes into vivid images of flesh and blood; his work was a perfect example of the humanistic ideal of ‘Ut pictura poesis’. Apart from his paintings—which included altarpieces, history and mythological scenes, portraits, and landscapes—he designed tapestries, book illustrations, and pageant decorations, as well as his own house and small items of sculpture and metalwork. His affinity with 16th-century Italian traditions is also demonstrated in his wide correspondence, by his art collection, and by the organization of his studio. It was this last that alone enabled him to meet the immense demand for his work; often a composition would be executed by assistants from a drawing or sketch by Rubens, who then added the finishing touches to the work. His numerous pupils and assistants included ...