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Article

A. G.  

Italian, 16th century, male.

Monogram of an engraver (including copper), print publisher (?). Religious subjects.

A.G. is mentioned by Brulliot, and believed to have been a pupil of Marcantonio Raimondi. He is known for his Virgin Holding the Infant Jesus, and Crowned by Two Angels...

Article

Dutch, 18th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the 18th century.

Engraver, print publisher.

Pieter Boudewyn van der Aa worked in Leiden from 1700 to 1750. He was both an artist and a businessman and published a number of catalogues for his business, notably in ...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 1 January 1836, in Mechelen, to French parents; died 1 April 1894, in Paris.

Engraver (etching/burin).

Abot studied under Gaucherel. He was among the artists retained by the publisher Goupil, whose titles included the journal L'Art and the Gazette des Beaux-Arts...

Article

Flemish School, 19th century, male.

Born 1794, in Bruges; died 1863.

Miniaturist.

This artist was a pupil of Ducq and displayed outstanding ability from the very start of his career. In 1833 he went to Paris, where he collaborated on the Journal des Gens du Monde...

Article

Flemish School, 17th century, male.

Active in London.

Painter.

Jan van Adam is mentioned in the journal of Turquet de Mayerne, physician to King Charles I of England.

Article

British, 18th century, male.

Engraver (line-engraving).

Francis Adams published a satirical journal in 1773 and penned several portraits in 1774; he received an Arts Society award in 1760.

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 1803, in New Germantown (New Jersey); died 1880, in Morristown (New Jersey).

Engraver (wood).

Joseph Alexander Adams worked for several years as a printer and then devoted himself to engraving on wood, which he initially studied alone. He later received advice from the engraver Alexander Anderson. He became a master and, with his pupils and collaborators, undertook the great work that made his reputation, ...

Article

T. Affleck Greeves

(b Burgess Hill, Sussex, 1849; d London, Aug 17, 1933).

English architect, editor and draughtsman. After completing his articles with H. N. Goulty of Brighton, he became assistant to William Ralph Emerson, and Architect to Brighton Council. Between 1872 and 1923 he was Editor of Building News. He instituted the Building News Designing Club, which enabled young architects to submit designs for his criticism. He contributed largely to the paper’s illustrations, redrawing designs for lithographic reproduction, and covered a wide range of subjects in a skilful and accurate, if somewhat dull, linear style. He also published several architectural books. Through the owner of Building News he obtained his major architectural commissions, notably Camberwell Polytechnic and Art Gallery (1902). He also designed country houses near London, for example Queensmead Cottage, Kings Road, Windsor, Berks (1883), for Reginald Talbot, as well as in Australia (e.g. Bellevue Hill, Double Bay, for Charles B. Fairfax in the mid-1880s) and America, where he designed timber houses in New Jersey for E. S. Wilde in ...

Article

(b Holywood, County Down, Ireland, Jan 26, 1922).

Australian painter, printmaker, book designer, lecturer, collector, gallery director and publisher of limited edition artists’ books, of Irish decent. He worked as a draughtsman before entering war service in the British Admiralty from 1940 to 1949, including five years in Colombo, where he made sketching trips to jungle temples with the Buddhist monk and artist Manjsiro Thero. Between 1949 and 1951 Adams worked as an exhibition designer in London and studied wood-engraving with Gertrude Hermes in her evening class at the Central School of Arts and Crafts (now Central St Martin’s College of Art and Design). In 1951, after moving to Melbourne, Adams began a 30-year teaching commitment at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT), where he instructed many of the younger generation of Australian printmakers, including George Baldessin and Jan Senbergs. A brief return to Britain and Ireland in 1957–8 provided experience with Dolmen Press, Dublin, which published his first book of engravings, ...

Article

German, 19th century, male.

Born 1780, in Nuremberg.

Engraver (line-engraving).

A pupil of Ambroise Gabler, he specialised in work for printers. Two portraits by him are mentioned, one of Marie Reizammer and one of Nanette Kuhn.

Article

German, 18th century, male.

Active in Breslau (now Wroclaw).

Engraver.

Son of the fabric printer John David Adolph.

Article

Spanish, 18th – 19th century, male.

Painter.

Adriazola was also a mathematician, journalist and soldier.

Article

Flemish, 16th – 17th century, male.

Born c. 1527, in Brussels; died 1612, in Rome.

Engraver, draughtsman, print publisher.

Flemish School.

Nicolaus van Aelst learned drawing and engraving in his home town of Brussels, then went to Rome where he set up a thriving trade in prints. This was his main activity, although he continued to engrave with a burin. It should be noted, however, that he was only the printer of the engraving of the statue of Henry II, the original artist being Tempesta....

Article

Russian, 19th century, male.

Active between 1809 and 1826 in Moscow.

Engraver (line-engraving).

This artist belonged to the school of the Moscow printer and collector P.P. Beketov. Under the direction of J. Rosanov, N.Z. Sokolov and A.J. Ossipov, Afanasiev engraved a series of three hundred portraits of famous Russians, published in three volumes between ...

Article

German, 19th century, male.

Engraver (steel).

This artist worked mainly for publisher G. G. Lange in Darmstadt.

Article

Chinese, 20th – 21st century, male.

Active in China and the United States.

Born 18 May 1957, in Beijing, China.

Artist, architect, designer, curator, publisher, activist.

After spending most of his childhood in the provinces of China, Ai Weiwei moved to Beijing in the mid-1970s to attend the city’s film academy. While there, he co-founded the first of the loose collectives of pro-democracy artists to emerge in the city, known as the Stars Group (1979–1983). In 1981, he travelled to the United States, first to Philadelphia before enrolling in New York City’s Parsons School of Design. During his student years, Ai worked at a printing press in the meatpacking district of New York City. In 1993, he returned to Beijing, where he co-founded the Chinese Art Archives & Warehouse (CAAW), a non-profit organization and gallery. In Shanghai in 2000, Ai co-curated, with Feng Boyi, the infamous Fuck Off exhibition, which was closed by the authorities at the same time that the first Shanghai Biennial took place. He published a series of books about experimental art in Europe and North America: ...

Article

German, 20th century, male.

Born 1889; died 1969.

Draughtsman, illustrator.

Self-taught, Alastair lived in Germany and often in Paris, where he was drawn to the study of black magic and transvestism. He worked for European and American publishers, illustrating many literary works by authors including Théophile Gautier, Barbey d'Aurevilly, Laclos, Mérimée, Poe, L'Abbé Prévost, Wedekind and Oscar Wilde....

Article

American, 20th–21st century, female.

Born 19 November 1960, in L’Anse (Michigan).

Book artist, poet, performance artist, publisher, educator. Artists’ books, wallpaper.

Conceptual Art.

Sally Alatalo completed her undergraduate degree in fine art at Kansas City Art Institute in 1982 and her master’s degree in fine art at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in ...

Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Active in Rome at the end of the 16th century.

Engraver, print publisher.

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 4 June 1867, in Grenoble; died 1933, in Grenoble.

Painter, watercolourist. Landscapes.

André Albertin was a journalist and art critic who learned painting from Laurent Guétal and Ernest Hareux. He exhibited at the various Paris Salons in 1895, 1896 and ...