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Article

Swiss, 18th century, male.

Born c. 1720, in Glaris; died 1750, in Glaris.

Engraver (copper), medallist.

A self-portrait engraved by him is documented.

Article

Italian, 17th – 18th century, male.

Active in Florence.

Sculptor, medallist.

Cited by Zani. Alberghetti would appear to come from a well-known family of artists of the same name who worked from the Renaissance to the end of the 18th century as both casters and sculptors in Ferrara, Florence and Venice (where several were in charge of casting operations at the Artillery)....

Article

German, 18th century, male.

Active in Lübeck.

Painter.

He made copies of paintings by old masters. His painting of The Punishment of Ananias and Sapphira after Raphael's cartoon, preserved in the Goldsmiths' Chapel at St Peter's in Lübeck, is of little artistic merit. It is signed by him and dated ...

Article

(b Quebec, Qué., Aug 10, 1764; d Quebec, Qué., June 3, 1839).

Canadian metalworker. He studied at the Petit Seminaire du Québec from 1778 to 1780 and began his apprenticeship c. 1780 in the silversmith’s shop of his elder brother, Jean-Nicolas Amiot (1750–1821); the tradition that he was apprenticed to François Ranvoyzé is unfounded. In 1782 he travelled to Paris to complete his training and remained there for five years, supported by his family. He absorbed the Louis XVI style, then popular in France, and after his return to Quebec in 1787 he set up a workshop to introduce this into Canada.

Much of Amiot’s work was for the Church, reworking traditional forms in the Louis XVI style. In a sanctuary lamp of 1788 for the church at Repentigny he elongated the standard shape and decorated it with a balanced arrangement of Neo-classical designs. After 1800 his work became formulaic and less innovative, though there are such notable exceptions as the chalice (...

Article

Mark Jones

(b Bordeaux, Nov 4, 1761; d Paris, Dec 10, 1822).

French medallist, engraver and illustrator. He was first apprenticed to the medallist André Lavau (d 1808) and then attended the Académie de Peinture et de Sculpture in Bordeaux. In 1786 he travelled to Paris and entered the workshop of Nicolas-Marie Gatteaux. His first great success was a large, realistic and highly detailed medal representing the Fall of the Bastille (1789); because it would have been difficult and risky to strike, he produced it in the form of single-sided lead impressions or clichés, coloured to resemble bronze. The following year he used this novel technique again, to produce an equally successful companion piece illustrating the Arrival of Louis XVI in Paris. Andrieu lay low during the latter part of the French Revolution, engraving vignettes and illustrating an edition of Virgil by Firmin Didot (1764–1836). He reappeared in 1800, with medals of the Passage of the Great St Bernard...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born 1696, in Nancy; died 2 March 1771, in Nancy.

Engraver (etching).

He was both a goldsmith and the director of the Mint at Nancy.

Article

Gordon Campbell

Italian family of gunsmiths, active in the village of Bargi (near Bologna) from the mid-17th century, when Sebastiano Aqua Fresca was making guns, until 1809, when Pietro Antonio Aqua Fresca died. The most prominent member of the family was Matteo Aqua Fresca (1651–1738), a superb steel-chiseller and engraver who specialized in gun locks but also made steel snuff-boxes....

Article

Emma Packer

(b Parish of St Martin’s in the Field, Middx; fl c. 1710–1750; d 1759).

English goldsmith. He was the son of Peter Archambo, a Huguenot refugee who worked in London as a staymaker. In 1710 he was apprenticed to the goldsmith Jacob Margas (c. 1685–after 1730) and, like Margas, became a freeman of the Butchers’ Company (rather than the Goldsmiths’ Company) on 7 December 1720. He first registered his mark at Goldsmiths’ Hall, London, in 1721, when he gave his address as the Golden Cup in Green Street. One of his apprentices was Thomas Heming. He produced fine quality domestic silver, and a wide range of objects, including cups, candlesticks, cream jugs and cake baskets, bearing his mark survives. His work is French in influence, and he is often credited with helping to introduce the Rococo style into England. His approach to the Rococo was, however, more restrained than that of some of his contemporaries, for example Paul de Lamerie. His work also often incorporates marine motifs. His most important patron was ...

Article

Italian, 18th century, male.

Died 1714.

Painter, engraver, medallist.

Active around 1676 in Carpi and Modena. He was particularly adept at reproducing flowers and, as a result, was often asked to supply contemporary medal-makers with various designs for coins.

Article

Spanish, 18th century, male.

Active in Valencia.

Painter, engraver (line-engraving).

Ascensio was a pupil at the Real Academia de San Fernando in Madrid, where he was appointed professor of engraving on metal in 1783 and later received the title of court engraver.

Article

Clare Le Corbeiller

French family of gold- and silversmiths. Robert-Joseph Auguste (b 1723; d ?1805) became a master in 1757 after an apprenticeship that included work for Louis XV. His repertoire was unusual in that it embraced both silver tableware and gold objects of vertu; the latter includes four gold boxes made between 1762 and 1763, and 1769 and 1771 (Paris, Louvre; New York, Met.; London, V&A; Althorp House, Northants). In 1775 he received payment for the royal crown and other regalia (destr.) made for the coronation of Louis XVI in 1774. The majority of his work in silver is tableware and includes partial or complete services for the courts of Denmark (Copenhagen, Kon. Saml.) and Russia (St Petersburg, Hermitage) and for Gustav Filip Creutz of Sweden (1775–6; Stockholm, Kun. Slottet). He also made a service for George III of England (1776–85; Paris, Louvre). Auguste’s style is characterized by a light and graceful Neo-classicism, in which festoons and figures of children as handles or finials are prominent....

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born possibly c. 1720, in Paris; died 1775.

Draughtsman, goldsmith, engraver (etching). Ornamental designs.

Babel entered the Académie de St-Luc in 1751.

New York (Metropolitan Mus. of Art): Design for a Cartouche (pen and ink wash)

Orléans: Two Seated Women...

Article

Polish, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1770, in Dukla; died after 1824, in Warsaw.

Sculptor, medallist.

Karl Barrend studied under Mathhaei Mattersperger, Casanova and Höckner in Dresden. In 1794 he showed several of his wax reliefs at the art exhibition held in the town. In ...

Article

(b Uttoxeter, 1682; bur; ?Derby, Oct 31, 1752).

English metalworker . He was the son of Sampson Bakewell, a blacksmith, and c. 1696 was apprenticed in London, possibly to a craftsman associated with the metalworker and designer Jean Tijou. In 1700 Bakewell made railings for a house in St James’s Place, London (in situ), belonging to Thomas Coke, Vice-Chamberlain to Queen Anne and King George I. He subsequently received a second commission from Coke for a garden arbour at Melbourne Hall, Coke’s country house in Derbyshire (in situ); Bakewell opened his forge in a house opposite the hall in 1707. The arbour, which is Bakewell’s best-known work, was completed in 1711; the panels of the cupola are filled with delicate scrollwork, with oak and laurel leaves at the front. The decorative elements are quite restrained and representative of the trend towards simplification of design in early 18th-century English ironwork, compared to the heavy, Baroque forms of Tijou’s work. In ...

Article

French family of goldsmiths and bronze-founders. Members of the Ballin family were active in Paris from the 16th century to the 18th. Claude Ballin (i) (b Paris, 3 May 1615; d Paris, 22 May 1678) became a master goldsmith in 1637. He was granted lodgings in the Louvre, Paris, before 1671 and became Orfèvre Ordinaire du Roi. Nicknamed ‘the Great Ballin’, he was one of the most prominent French goldsmiths of the 17th century. He worked extensively for Louis XIV, providing an enormous quantity of silver and silver-gilt objects, including vases, bowls, display stands and incense-burners that formed part of the silver furnishings (destr. 1690) of the château of Versailles. Ballin’s work in the classical style also included ecclesiastical pieces (untraced) for the cathedrals of Paris and Reims that are known from numerous drawings (Berlin, Kstbib. & Mus.; Stockholm, N. Mus.; Beauvais, Archvs Dépt.), and which also feature in some wall-hangings, for example the ...

Article

Belgian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 8 September 1768, in Namur; died 10 June 1826.

Architect, sculptor, engraver, metal worker.

Barbier studied first in Belgium before completing his studies in Antwerp at the studio of J. Verbekt. He was appointed sculptor of the king's buildings and lived for a time at the Louvre. His works include medallions of ...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born 3 August 1793, in Paris; died 10 June 1855, in Neuilly-sur-Seine.

Engraver, medallist, draughtsman. Coins, banknotes, postage stamps, seals.

Barre was apprenticed at the age of twelve to a carver, foundry worker and gilder. Four years later, he was drafted into the fire service in Paris, where he worked until ...

Article

Bernt von Hagen

In 

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Engraver.

De Bary's only known work is a small sheet of ornamentation for goldsmiths, signed P. de Bary, 1727.

Article

Italian, 18th century, male.

Active in Bolognac.1700.

Sculptor, medallist.

Sculpted a Holy Family group for the archbishop's palace in Bologna, and the figures on either side of the altar in the degli Angeli church.