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Article

Gordon Campbell

Name of at least four potters in Staffordshire in the late 18th century and early 19th. The most distinguished William Adams (1746–1805) was the founder of Greengates Pottery, where the design and high quality of his jasper ware has led to the mistaken inference that he had been trained by Josiah Wedgwood; in fact he trained with John Brindley, brother of the canal builder James Brindley. His wares, of which some 300 examples are known to survive, are stamped Adams and Co. Apart from jasper ware, he also made underglaze blue-printed ware. He was succeeded by his son Benjamin, who ran the business until its closure in 1820.

The works of Adams of Greengates are sometimes confused with those of his three namesakes: William Adams (1748–1831) of Brick House, Burslem and Cobridge; William Adams of Stoke-on-Trent (1772–1829), who exported many blue-painted wares to the USA; and William Adams (...

Article

Carlos Cid Priego

(b Logroño, Dec 26, 1759; d Madrid, 1842).

Spanish sculptor and ceramicist. He moved to Madrid at an early age and was apprenticed to the French sculptor Robert Michel (i), who was employed at the court. He won first prize in a competition at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes, and organized the royal workshop for the carving of precious stones, where he executed two magnificent cameo portraits of Charles IV and Queen Maria Luisa (c. 1796; Madrid, Pal. Real). He was a leading sculptor in the Buen Retiro porcelain factory, for which he produced a large amount of work. In 1797 he entered the Real Academia de Bellas Artes and was promoted until he was finally appointed Director-general in 1821. He was also appointed Honorary Chamber Sculptor to Charles IV. His successful career made him an influential figure in Spanish art. He was one of the leading exponents of Neo-classical sculpture, producing works that were technically accomplished although stylistically rather cold. He executed a large amount of work between ...

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born c. c. 1766, in Heinitz, a village near Meissen; died 1828.

Painter (including gouache/porcelain), draughtsman. Landscapes, flowers.

A pupil of the Meissen porcelain factory's art school, in particular of Christian Lindner, Arnhold was appointed court drawing master and painter. From ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1760, in Strasbourg; died c. 1831, in Paris.

Painter.

Baltz executed miniatures on porcelain, his subjects being portraits and landscapes. The miniatures are dispersed across various art collections in France, Russia and Germany.

London, 28 June 1962: Three Children in a Landscape, One Playing with a Bird...

Article

Swiss, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1744, in Basel; died 1818, in Berlin.

Sculptor.

Until 1775, Emmanuel Bardou was a modeller for the royal porcelain manufacturer in Berlin. He exhibited a bronze statuette of Frederick the Great in 1786, a statue of Schwerin in 1787...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born at the end of the 18th century or the beginning of the 19th century, in Lyons.

Miniaturist.

Worked with porcelain and enamel in Munich around 1830. Specialised in landscapes.

Article

John Mawer

(b Derby, bapt Oct 12, 1758; d Coalport, Jan 16, 1828).

English ceramic artist and porcelain manufacturer. In 1774 he was apprenticed to William Duesbury at the Derby porcelain factory, where his father, William Billingsley (d 1770), was a flower painter. He became one of their chief flower painters and some ten years later developed a new, soft, naturalistic style of painting flower petals on ceramics that came to be widely, though poorly, imitated at other English factories. His innovative technique involved painting with a heavily loaded brush, and then wiping away much of the paint with a virtually dry brush to produce more delicate colours and highlights (e.g. two-handled tray, c. 1790; Derby, Mus. & A.G.). Though particularly famous for his ‘Billingsley roses’, he also painted landscapes, buildings and other botanical subjects. In 1795 he helped John Coke (1776–1841) to set up a porcelain factory at Pinxton, Derbys. By 1799 he was working as a decorator of blanks, first in Mansfield, then moving in ...

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 12 April 1772, in Wolverhampton, in 1762 according to Larousse Dictionary; died 2 November 1819, in London.

Painter. Genre scenes.

Edward Bird first learned his trade in pottery works in Birmingham before moving to Bristol to create a drawing school. He pursued his creative career alongside his teaching activities, painting until his death in ...

Article

Swiss, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 31 December 1758, in Zollikon, near Zurich; died 25 January 1823, in Feuerthalen.

Painter (gouache), illuminator, draughtsman, engraver. Landscapes.

In his youth, Johann Heinrich Bleuler learnt porcelain painting at the Kilchberg-Schooren works, but gave it up to devote his energies to an artistic career, studying under Heinrich Uster. He then worked for Matthäus Pfenninger in Zurich, producing topographical views of Switzerland. Around ...

Article

Thérèse Picquenard

(b Paris, Oct 9, 1743; d Paris, March 10, 1809).

French sculptor. He was the son of Antoine Boizot (1704–82), a designer at the Gobelins, and a pupil of René-Michel Slodtz. He studied at the Académie Royale, Paris, winning the Prix de Rome in 1762, and after a period at the Ecole Royale des Elèves Protégés he completed his education from 1765 to 1770 at the Académie de France in Rome. He was accepted (agréé) by the Académie Royale in 1771, presenting the model (untraced) for a statuette of Meleager, but was not received (reçu) as a full member until 1778, when he completed the marble version (Paris, Louvre). He exhibited regularly at the Paris Salon until 1800.

The first years of Boizot’s career were dedicated primarily to decorative sculpture, such as the model for the elaborate allegorical gilt-bronze clock known as the ‘Avignon’ clock (c. 1770; London, Wallace; see France, Republic of, §IX, 2, (iii), (a)...

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 6 February 1755, in Truro; died 17 December 1834, in Somerstown.

Painter (including porcelain), miniaturist. Religious subjects, portraits.

Henry Bone initially painted on porcelain and then, in London in 1779, he copied Reynolds' Sleeping Girl in enamel. He went on to produce copies of Titian (British Museum) and Rubens's work. A part of his gallery of ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born c. 1755, in Paris; died at the beginning of 1814, in Paris.

Sculptor.

A pupil of Boizot, Bouvet worked at the Sèvres porcelain factory from 1784-92; his first Salon exhibits were in 1800: Consul General Bonaparte, Bonaparte Driving a Chariot... Crowned by Victory...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1766; died 1830.

Sculptor.

He worked at the Sèvres porcelain factory from 1782-1824, along with his younger brother Alexandre, known as Brachard the Younger (at Sèvres from 1784-1827). Their father, Nicolas Brachard, was a modeller at the Sèvres factory ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Painter, engraver (burin). Allegorical subjects, genre scenes.

Active in Paris around 1780, he was still living in the city in 1815. His works include The Coppersmith, after G.-M. Kraus, the Pottery-Mender, after G.-M. Kraus, Woman Pressing her Breast, and an ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, female.

Painter. Flowers.

Active at the Sèvres porcelain factory from 1778 to 1816.

Article

Chanou  

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

This family of artists worked for the Sèvres porcelain factory.

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, female.

Painter. Flowers.

Julie Chanou painted on porcelain in the Sèvres manufactory between 1753 and 1800.

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Painter (including porcelain). Flowers. Decorative schemes.

Louis Chulot worked for the Sèvres porcelain works from 1755 to 1800.

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1753, in Berlin; died c. 1822.

Miniaturist.

He studied under his father, Jacques Clauce, before going to Dresden in 1777 to complete his studies. He worked at porcelain factories.

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b 1774; d c. 1846).

English painter and sculptor, active also in America. He worked in porcelain, plaster, and terracotta and after an early career in an artificial stone factory in London he moved c. 1792 to the Derby Porcelain Factory, where he worked as a modeller. In 1816 he emigrated to America, where he contributed architectural decoration to the University of Virginia, including the plaster of Paris friezes for the university buildings and internal plaster and lead ornaments for various buildings....