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Susan Pares

[Pak Sŏ-bo]

(b1931).

Korean painter and teacher. He graduated in 1954 from the Fine Arts College, Hong’ik University, Seoul, and exhibited in Korea, East and South-east Asia, the USA, Europe and elsewhere. He is regarded as a leader of Korean modernism. Park has used a variety of techniques. Typical of his Art informel stage is Painting No. 1 (1957; oil on canvas, priv. col., see Young-na Kim, p. 177), where paint was splashed on to the canvas. In his ‘white’ paintings, thin layers of gesso were applied over a period of time, then graphite and gesso were applied alternately to build up a surface. In 1989 he began to use tak (mulberry bark paper), laid in three layers on canvas, sealed with gesso and overlaid with acrylic paint. Further sheets of paper, soaked in acrylic medium or Korean ink, were then laid, and the surface was manipulated with the fingers or an implement. In working or marking the surface Park’s intention was to help the medium to express itself by adding nothing more than a sign of his involvement, which he termed his ‘écriture’; one of his works is titled simply ...

Article

Susan Pares

[Lee Kang-so; Yi Kang-so]

(b Taegu, 1943).

Korean artist. He studied at Seoul National University and Kyemyong University, Taegu, and has exhibited in Korea, Japan, the USA, Europe and elsewhere. A leading modernist and active member of the Korean Avant Garde Association, Lee played a decisive role in the first Korean contemporary art festival in 1974. He has experimented with many techniques, from painting, drawings, prints and photography to installation, performance and video art. In the mid-1980s he began to concentrate on paintings in oil, employing subdued blues and greys. On such surfaces he placed images of ducks, deer and boats, executed in brushstrokes that in their calligraphic quality acknowledge Korean traditions. His subjects are seen as symbolic of shamanist images (see Korea, §I, 5) and reveal a perceptive awareness of nature. His use of after-images, especially of ducks, hints at the shifting movement of the birds.

Flow from the Far East (exh. cat., ed. ...