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Article

Marco Livingstone

(b Melbourne, May 5, 1951; d Melbourne, July 22, 1999).

Australian painter. While studying painting at Prahran College, Melbourne, from 1969 to 1971, he discovered airbrushes, technical tools employed by commercial artists which he adopted with alacrity as his favoured instrument for picture-making. At art school Arkley met the collage artist and painter Elizabeth Gower, who had a significant influence over his work. They married in 1973, later separating in 1980. In 1977 he travelled to Paris and New York on residencies, and it was during this time that he became fascinated by architectural motifs as inspirations for painting. In Paris he assiduously photographed Art Nouveau and Art Deco doorways in black and white, intending to use these images as reference points for paintings on his return to Australia. Once back there, however, he decided that he needed to find imagery and subject-matter relevant to his own identity as an Australian. While ringing the doorbell of his mother’s house in suburban Melbourne, he noticed the flywire screen door and realized at once that this indigenous architectural feature, banal and disregarded, would be a much more suitable subject than the artistic doorways of Paris. Following this revelation, he made a succession of identically sized paintings in an elongated vertical format corresponding to these flywire screens, but betraying an astonishing variety of motifs and colour schemes. ...

Article

French, 20th – 21st century, female.

Active also active in Italy.

Born 31 October 1957, in Bordeaux.

Architect, designer, draughtswoman. Furniture, rug design.

Martine Bedin was awarded a bursary to study architecture in Florence in 1978, and then graduated from the École d'Architecture in Paris. She began her formal research in ...

Article

Wojciech Włodarczyk

(b Kraków, July 25, 1953).

Polish sculptor and poster designer. Between 1973 and 1978 he studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw in the sculpture studio of Jerzy Jarnuszkiewicz. From 1978 he exhibited and took part in sculptural symposia (on marble and granite) in Poland, Italy, France and Germany. Between 1976 and 1981 he designed posters for the Laboratory Theatre (Teatr Laboratorium) of Jerzy Grotowski.

Bednarski became one of the leading representatives in Poland of the ‘new sculpture’ of the 1980s. He produced individual sculptures (up to the early 1980s in small numbers) and later tended towards installations and performances. Several recurrent elements (e.g. the plaster head of Karl Marx in different arrangements and variants shown at exhibitions in 1978, 1986 and 1988) and repeated motifs are evident in his work. He often drew on literature (Herman Melville and Joseph Brodsky) and on the realities of Polish Communism, usually employing familiar signs and symbols. These equivocal and diverse sculptures and installations are primarily autobiographical. His most important installation, ...

Article

French, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 2 October 1961, in Jonzac.

Painter.

Bruno Bressolin worked between 1985 and 1987 as a graphic designer for the Virgin France record company, designing logos, poster and album covers. Concurrently, he worked as a painter and exhibited at the Galerie Colbert in Paris. He is noted for compositions dating from October ...

Article

German, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1946, in Gelnhausen.

Sculptor. Monuments.

Claus Bury trained as a goldsmith from 1962 to 1965, and attended Pforzheim college of industrial art and design from 1965 to 1969. He completed his training in London in 1969-1970. In 1971 he became a visiting teacher in several towns in Germany, the UK, Israel and the USA, and in ...

Article

American, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 6 November 1932, in Emporia (Kansas).

Assemblage artist, painter, furniture designer.

Wendell Castle studied at the University of Kansas, receiving a BFA in sculpture in 1958 and an MFA in industrial design in 1961. He has taught at the University of Kansas (...

Article

French, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1946, in Paris.

Painter, draughtsman.

Marc Chaimowicz studied at London's Slade School of Fine Art. He works on a broad range of disparate materials and substrates - printed fabric, canvas, paper, furniture and so on - to produce highly decorative items....

Article

Simon Njami

(b Karentaba, 1954).

Senegalese painter and furniture designer. He graduated from the Ecole Normale Supérieure d’Education Artistique and the International School of Art and Research, Nice. He taught at the Ecole Nationale des Arts and in 1997 was president of the National Association of Fine Arts, Senegal, as well as a member of the Economic and Social Council of Senegal. In the 1980s his ‘dense and emotive’ works were figurative and dealt with general issues such as violence. His work of the mid-1990s was made with strips of cotton cloth, fashioned on canvases so as to create areas of three-dimensional relief, and colored with browns and ochres. He also created brightly coloured figurative acrylic pieces on paper. He exhibited in the first (1995) and second (1997) Johannesburg Biennale and at other international shows in Senegal, Russia, Belgium, Switzerland, Burkina-Faso, Argentina, the USA and elsewhere. His furniture designs include a table made from old machinery parts, gears, hoes and glass, which was included in Dak’Art ’98. In the late 1990s he was considered one of Senegal’s pre-eminent artists....

Article

French, 20th – 21st century, female.

Born 1957, in Lille.

Painter. Figure compositions. Designs for carpets, furniture, ceramics and objets d'art.

Marie Ducaté lives and works in Marseilles. Her paintings present male nudes, alone or with others, in interiors or paradisal landscapes. These works disconcert by placing men in poses that in classical iconography are normally associated with the female. They recline languidly within kitsch interiors, with every detail of furnishing meticulously delineated. The effect is consciously heightened by the fact that the scene may comprise elements borrowed from the history of art, such as a Cubist floor or some drapery in the style of the Renaissance. Since ...

Article

American, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1969.

Sculptor of assemblages.

Vincent Fecteau's sculptures have similarities with baroque furniture. He has been exhibiting regularly in the USA since the early 1990s, particularly at Feature Inc. in New York. He has participated in various collective exhibitions, including: ...

Article

German, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1956.

Installation artist, sculptor. Animals.

In the 1980s Grünfeld created rigorously constructed installations portraying bourgeois furniture. These installations integrated composite items of furniture within the gallery space, which were seemingly usable but dangerously unstable; they were designed to be seen and not used, such as wooden frames with the picture missing, instead filled with padding and supported by coloured leather. Similarly, borrowing from animal sculpture, in the 1990s he created the ...

Article

American, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1942, in Atlanta.

Sculptor.

Brower Hatcher studied engineering before obtaining a BA in Industrial Design from the Pratt Institute in 1967. He then studied for an MA at the St. Martin's School of Art in London where he later taught. He taught at Bennington College until ...

Article

American, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1955, in Kenosha (Wisconsin).

Installation artist. Furniture.

Jim Isermann lives and works in Palm Springs, California. In his furniture pieces and wall coverings he attempts to broach the middle ground between high art and design. In 1950s America, industrial designers sought to imbue utilitarian objects with utopian ideals borrowed from the visual arts. In turn, artists with Pop, Op Art or Minimalist agendas looked to domestic products for inspiration, recognising their role as mass-produced icons of a new found capitalist optimism. This dialogue between ornamentation, materiality and iconography provides the basis for Isermann's work. In ...

Article

French, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 4 November 1952, in Casablanca.

Sculptor (including bronze), assemblage artist, designer. Furniture.

Using a variety of objects and materials, Michel Kiriliuk creates what he calls furniture - tables, consoles and standard lamps - the extremely Baroque nature of which renders their use problematic. He has exhibited at various Salons in Paris, including the Salon des Artistes Décorateurs and the Salon d'Automne....

Article

Hungarian, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1959, in Mako.

Painter (mixed media).

Tamas Kotai trained as an industrial designer. He won the Derkovits study prize. Somewhat abstract, his painting style encourages the viewer to establish links between different feelings. In 1986, he became a member of the ...

Article

German, 20th – 21st century, female.

Born 1962, in Munich.

Painter, installation artist, photographer. Wall decorations, furniture.

Regina Möller lives and works in Berlin. Using installations or photographs, she tackles the subject of traditional representations of women in daily life, at home or at work, putting herself in the situation. Since ...

Article

French, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1955, in Rheims.

Painter, installation artist.

The starting point of Jean-Luc Moulene's work is advertising and its styles of expression - logos, brands and packaging - but he also uses artistic references in their generic forms (nudes, portraits, still-lifes, landscapes). His impressive silkscreen prints and posters raise questions about the way art is produced, distributed and retailed....

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 16 June 1917, in Plainfield, New Jersey; died 7 October 2009, in New York City.

Photographer. Portraits, still-lifes, figures, fashion.

Raised in Philadelphia by a watchmaker and a nurse, Irving Penn graduated from the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art in ...

Article

A. E. Duffey

(b Bournemouth, Dec 4, 1942).

South African potter of English birth. He moved to South Africa with his parents in 1947 and trained as a commercial artist at the Durban Art School. After a six-month sculpture course he started a pottery apprenticeship at the Walsh Marais Studio in Durban and continued his training with Sammy Liebermann (1920–84) in Johannesburg. In 1961 he took over the Walsh Marais Studio, but in 1964 he closed it and travelled to Europe, where he met such leading potters as Lucie Rie, Bernard Leach and Michael Cardew. He was invited to work at the Gustavberg factory near Stockholm and later went to Germany, where he started a pottery studio and signed a year’s contract to teach at the art academy in Hamburg. In 1967 he returned to South Africa and in 1968 established a studio at N’Shongweni in Natal. In 1969 he visited Japan and befriended Shōji Hamada, who strongly influenced him. Walford produced mainly functional but individual pieces....

Article

Mary M. Tinti

(b Warsaw, April 14, 1943).

Polish designer and installation artist, active also in the USA . Wodiczko received his MFA in Industrial Design from the Academy of Fine Arts, Warsaw, in 1968. He came to the United States by way of Canada, and in 1991 joined the ranks at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he became Director of the Center for Art, Culture, and Technology (formerly the Center for Advanced Visual Studies) and head of the Interrogative Design Group.

Concerned with the social and philosophical implications behind notions of democracy, memory, trauma, testimony, nomadism, immigration, alienation, and marginalization, Wodiczko’s body of work grew to include interactive instruments, site strategic slide and video projections, and monuments to shared histories and recollections. Through his art, Wodiczko literally and metaphorically gave voice to those who could not speak or, for certain political or personal reasons, could not be heard.

In 1980 he began his public projection series of large-scale images on real-world architectural backdrops (to which he added sound and movement in the mid-1990s). By overlaying his phantom images on the actual edifice of a public building, Wodiczko asked audiences to consider how public sites signify—or fail to convey—important contemporary truths. His projections became increasingly more collaborative, and by ...