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Revised and updated by Margaret Barlow

(b Urbana, IL, March 31, 1942).

American performance artist, video artist, and writer. Graham founded the Daniels Gallery in New York and was its director from 1964 to 1965; there he came into contact with Minimalist artists such as Carl Andre, Sol LeWitt, and Donald Judd. This led him to question the gallery structure and the art displayed and to experiment with conceptual art. From 1965 to 1969 he produced a series of works published in magazines, such as Schema (1966; Brussels, Daled priv. col., see 1988 exh. cat., p. 9). This series consisted merely of a descriptive list of its own contents, including the number of words, and so referred to nothing beyond itself, unlike Minimalist art that he believed referred to the surrounding display space. Furthermore, the magazine was, unlike a gallery, clearly related to time and change through its regular appearance and topicality.

From 1969 to 1978 Graham was primarily involved with performance, film, and video. His first performance took place at the Loeb Student Center at New York University in ...

Article

Denise Carvalho

(b Rio de Janeiro, 1948).

Brazilian interventionist, multimedia, installation and conceptual artist, considered the most influential contemporary artist of his country. While international critics have compared his work with North American Minimalism and Conceptual art, Meireles insisted that art should be seductive. He studied at the National School of Fine Arts and at the Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro. Coming of age at a time of the military dictatorship in Brazil (1964–85), he circumvented strict state censorship with a series of interventionist works, adding politically charged texts and reinserting the works back into circulation.

Insertions into Ideological Circuits: Coca-Cola Project (1970) included Coca-Cola bottles with the added text ‘Yankees. Go Home!’ In Insertions into Ideological Circuits: Cédula Project (1970), the same message was printed on one dollar bills, and on the current Brazilian currency, the Cruzeiro. Some bills also queried ‘Who killed Herzog?’ referring to a Brazilian journalist who died while in police custody. Meireles’ series utilizes a mechanistic process of capitalistic insertion and circulation, adding phrases that question the methods and policies of the dictatorship. ...

Article

American, 20th–21st century, male.

Born 1938, in Mason City or Electric City (Washington); died 21 January 2011, in New York City.

Painter (including gouache), pastellist, draughtsman, sculptor, installation artist. Multimedia.

Conceptual Art, Minimal Art, Body Art, Land Art.

Dennis Oppenheim studied at the College of Arts and Crafts, California, and the University of Stanford. Until 1967, Oppenheim made sculptures related to the primary structures of Minimal Art, although they are comparatively small and he presented them in series of trapezoidal boxes and cylindrical trunks. From 1967, he lived and worked in New York City. In 1967–1968, he became a conceptual artist and a proponent of Land Art, working mainly out of doors and in large spaces. He then documented his operations by means of photographs accompanied by texts and plans. Great care was taken with the graphic presentation of his actions, as the works themselves are largely ephemeral. He mowed undulating lines in fields, traced paths through cultivated land and snowfields, and in New York he spread rectangles of salt in the city’s streets. He also worked in the sea, spreading pigment in the water, then covering the surface with burning petrol and meticulously photographing the results. These experiments led the Yale Faculty of Architecture to commission from him plans for the sculptural use of excavations created by road building. He made practical volumes consisting of mounds, depressions, and steps that could be climbed between them. In 1969, after befriending artist Vito Acconci, he experimented with Body Art, often subjecting himself to violent physical alterations such as sunburns. Oppenheim’s use of his own body explored the connection between a work and its site, using the physical body itself as not only a medium but a place. During the 1970s, he was extremely prolific, creating installations that included puppets representing himself with animals and various objects that related to the events and worries of his own life. The late 1970s series ...

Article

Portuguese, 20th century, male.

Born 1938, in Lourenço-Marques (Mozambique).

Painter, sculptor.

Minimal Art.

Around 1970, Angelo Sousa spent two years in London learning about sculpture and multimedia. He then went on to produce minimalist-inspired sculptures in metal. On his return to Mozambique, and after a period of reflection, he went back to the use of colour, embracing a system comprising the three primary factors in art - the elemental, the industrial and the physical....