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Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, female.

Born in Tasmania.

Sculptor.

Dorothy Willis Barclay exhibited at the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1910.

Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, female.

Sculptor.

Baskerville exhibited a statue entitled Young Girl Picking Flowers at the third annual exhibition of the Yarra Sculptors' Society in Melbourne (1910).

Article

Australian, 20th century, male.

Born 1940.

Painter, sculptor, illustrator.

Peter Booth passed from Abstract-Minimal painting to a violent Expressionism in 1977, at which time he realised his first Figurative painting. His works frequently depict human misfortunes and torments, in chaotic compositions tinged with religious sentiments....

Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Sculptor.

Myril MacDougall Bowman exhibited at the Salon des Tuileries from 1925 to 1928.

Article

British, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in Florence, Sydney and London.

Of Australian origin.

Sculptor.

Article

Edward Hanfling

(b Hastings, March 21, 1930; d New Plymouth, Dec 8, 2011).

New Zealand sculptor, painter, printmaker, and installation artist. His art primarily involves assemblage, often with an eye to colour relationships; it also incorporates diverse sources including American modernism, African, and Asian art. Driver had little formal training and worked as a dental technician before he began sculpting with wood, clay, and dental plaster during the 1950s. Between 1960 and 1964 he produced assemblages and collages reminiscent of Robert Rauschenberg, though Driver was not aware of the American’s work then (e.g. Large Brass). In the United States from March to August 1965, he developed an interest in Post-painterly Abstraction as well as in Jasper Johns’s works. References to New York are manifest in his mixed-media wall relief La Guardia 2 (1966; Auckland, A.G.). The Painted Reliefs (1970–74) with their horizontal panels and strips of varying width and depth, mostly painted but sometimes aluminium, indicate the impact of American abstraction, notably that of Kenneth Noland. ...

Article

Graeme Sturgeon

(b Cockatoo, Victoria, March 18, 1867; d Melbourne, Sept 27, 1925).

Australian sculptor. After inauspicious beginnings and apprenticeship to a pastry cook, Gilbert was led, through his skill in modelling cake decorations, to attend part-time drawing classes at the National Gallery School, Melbourne (1888–91). He also enrolled in night classes at the Victorian Artists’ Society, where he found sympathetic encouragement from the sculptor Charles Douglas Richardson (1853–1932). At that time there was no instruction available in the traditional techniques of sculpture so Gilbert taught himself, continuing to earn his living as a chef at a fashionable Melbourne restaurant. In 1914, aged 47, Gilbert left for London to see the work of the great European sculptors of the past, but the outbreak of World War I only weeks after his arrival left him stranded in England. Too old for either military service or art school, he went on working at his sculpture, submitting it each year to the Royal Academy exhibitions. In ...

Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1862, in Portsmouth, England; died 26 July 1926, in Harbord, Sydney.

Sculptor. Portrait busts.

Nelson Illingworth migrated to the USA as a child, but returned to England at the age of 14 and became an apprentice plasterer in Brighton. For nine years, he worked as a model-maker and modeller at the Royal Doulton potteries in London while taking evening classes at the City and Guilds School of Modelling. In ...

Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born c. 1865; died c. 1930.

Sculptor. Animals.

Erlikilyika was an Aboriginal from the southern Arrernte language group in central Australia. In 1901 he was employed as a guide and interpreter on Baldwin Spencer and F.J. Gillen's anthropological expedition to the Gulf of Carpentaria. His narrative drawings and sculptures in wood and kaolinite caught the attention of Gillen who asked him to fill a book of sketches with depictions of camp life for his sons. In ...

Article

(b St Petersburg, Sept 13, 1873; d Cobbity, NSW, May 29, 1930).

Australian painter, draughtsman and sculptor. He lived for a period in Europe and emigrated to Australia in 1887. He trained under Julian Rossi Ashton, gaining early recognition for his draughtsmanship. In 1901 he studied in Paris at the Académie Colarossi under Auguste Delécluse (b 1855). He was strongly influenced by the work of Diego Velázquez and Edouard Manet. The work of Sandro Botticelli later inspired him to paint in a high key and with an enhanced realism, as in Important People (1914; Sydney, A.G. NSW). He lived in England from 1902 to 1921, and thereafter in Australia.

At first Lambert earned his living through illustrations for magazines and books. In early paintings such as Across the Black Soil Plains (1899; Sydney, A.G. NSW), he expressed a nationalist sentiment through the depiction of Australian pioneers. His principal work was in portraiture, in both pencil and oil, in which he demonstrated a sensitive appreciation of character and bravura style. He also painted large, highly stylized paintings of family and friends, such as ...

Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in Australia from 1887.

Born 13 September 1873, in St Petersburg, Russia, to an American father and a British mother; died 29 May 1930, in Cobbity, New South Wales.

Painter, sculptor. Nudes, portraits, genre scenes, landscapes.

George Washington Lambert's family lived in Württemberg, Germany and in England before migrating to Australia in 1887. He trained with Julian Ashton at the Art Society of New South Wales in Sydney and in 1894 he exhibited with the Art Society and the Society of Artists. The following year he began producing pen-and-ink cartoons for the ...

Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active mainly in Britain and France from 1882.

Born 12 June 1863, in Fitzroy (Melbourne), to Scottish parents; died 10 October 1931.

Sculptor.

Bertram MacKennal trained under his father, who was a sculptor, and subsequently at the National Gallery School in Melbourne ...

Article

Geoffrey R. Edwards

(b Melbourne, June 1863; d Devon, England, Oct 1931).

Australian sculptor, active in Britain. He studied at the National Gallery of Victoria School in Melbourne from 1878 to 1882 and then on the suggestion of the English sculptor Marshall Wood (d 1882) he travelled to London, where he spent three months at the Royal Academy Schools in 1883. Finding the training there too academic Mackennal left and visited Paris and Rome, and in 1884 he set up a studio in Paris. He was helped financially by John Peter Russell, who also introduced him to Auguste Rodin. Mackennal found Rodin’s work too revolutionary for his own tastes but did adopt aspects of Rodin’s sensuous subject-matter. Also in Paris he met Alfred Gilbert, who advised him that his work would be better appreciated in England. In 1886 Mackennal became the head of the modelling and design department at the Coalport Potteries, Salop, England, and in 1887 he won the competition to design two relief panels for the façade of the ...

Article

(b Kentish Town, London, Nov 1, 1868; d Melbourne, Jan 15, 1938).

English sculptor, active in Australia. The son of Horace Montford, Curator of Schools at the Royal Academy of Art, London, he learnt modelling from his father and drawing at the Lambeth School of Art. After studying on a Landseer and British Institute scholarship at the Royal Academy and winning a Gold Medal in 1891, he taught sculpture at the Chelsea School of Art (South-West London Polytechnic) from 1898 to 1903. He also specialized in architectural decoration, completing, for example, reliefs (1892) for Battersea Town Hall and Polytechnic and bronze figure groups (1914) for the Kelvin-Way Bridge, Glasgow. In 1912 he married Marian Alice Dibden, a portrait- and miniature painter. In 1921, attracted by the light, which he believed conducive to monumental sculpture, they travelled to Australia. Montford became very influential in the Victorian Artists’ Society, of which he was President 1930–31. He frequently used the daily press to air avant-garde opinions about the social and environmental role of sculpture in modern cities. He encouraged and assisted such emerging Australian sculptors as Lyndon Dadswell. Montford’s flamboyance, theatrical personality and Bohemian lifestyle were talking points in Melbourne society and led to more than 70 sculptural commissions, including a controversial ...

Article

(b Ballarat, Victoria, 1870; d Rome, Feb 8, 1948).

Australian sculptor and medallist, also active in Italy. Ohlfsen-Bagge came from a well-connected family, attending Sydney Girls’ High School (1884–6) and studying piano under French pianist Henri Kowalski (1841–1916). In 1886 she left Australia to continue musical studies in Berlin at Kullak’s Neue Akademie der Tonkunst under Moritz Moszkowski (1854–1925). She performed for the Kaiser, but was forced to abandon the piano due to neuritis. Her father’s ruin in the 1890 depression forced her to earn a living teaching musical theory. By 1896 she had moved to St Petersburg where she became secretary to the American Consul-General. She turned to sketching and caricature and her talent was so impressive that her Russian friends took her to Rome around 1900. There she learnt the art of modelling and engraving under Camille Alaphillipe and Pierre Dautel. Already mature, she began her artistic career in the tradition of the expatriate American women sculptors living bohemian lives in Rome....

Article

Roger Neich

(b Mangamuka, nr Kaitaia, 1854; d Rotorua, Sept 1931).

New Zealand Maori wood-carver. He went to Rotorua with his mother when he was a few years old, following her capture and forced removal to North Auckland. He grew up at Ruato on Lake Rotoiti among his own people of Ngati Tarawhai, who were celebrated wood-carvers and canoe builders. He learnt the art of wood-carving in the 1870s from his skilled older relatives, Anaha Te Rahui (1822–1913) and Wero Taroi ( fl 1850–80), but by this time large carved war canoes had become obsolete, being replaced by fully carved meeting-houses as the focus of tribal pride and prestige. Waitere assisted his older relatives on the large carved houses that many tribes in various parts of North Island were commissioning from Ngati Tarawhai; the houses on which he worked include Tiki-a-Tamamutu (1878) at Taupo, Uenuku-mai-Rarotonga (1875) at Maketu and Tuhoromatakaka (1909) at Whakarewarewa. He also became a prolific carver for the Rotorua tourist market, executing large commissions for the New Zealand Government Tourist Department. While working for these European patrons he experimented with naturalism, perspective elements and narrative scenes illustrating local tribal legends. Rauru meeting-house (...

Article

Australian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active also active in Great Britain.

Born 1869, in Talbot; died 3 October 1925.

Sculptor.

Charles Webb-Gilbert, who was self-taught, was one of the most important sculptors of his time in Australia. He also worked in London and sculpted the Australian War Memorial in St-Quentin, France....