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Article

American, 19th – 20th century, female.

Active in New Yorkc.1905-1906.

Born 1869, in Florence, Italy; died 1948.

Painter, decorative designer.

Article

Alan Crawford

Informal movement in architecture and the decorative arts that championed the unity of the arts, the experience of the individual craftsman, and the qualities of materials and construction in the work itself.

The Arts and Crafts Movement developed in the second half of the 19th century and lasted well into the 20th, drawing its support from progressive artists, architects and designers, philanthropists, amateurs, and middle-class women seeking work in the home. They set up small workshops apart from the world of industry, revived old techniques, and revered the humble household objects of pre-industrial times. The movement was strongest in the industrializing countries of northern Europe and in the USA, and it can best be understood as an unfocused reaction against industrialization. Although quixotic in its anti-industrialism, it was not unique; indeed it was only one among several late 19th-century reform movements, such as the Garden City movement, vegetarianism, and folksong revivals, that set the Romantic values of nature and folk culture against the artificiality of modern life....

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, female.

Born 1871, in Chicago.

Painter, decorative designer.

Frances Louise Baker trained in Paris with Collin and Merson.

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1861, in Detroit (Michigan); died 1938, in Katonah (New York), committed suicide.

Painter, pastellist, engraver. Animals, landscapes, still-lifes. Wall decorations.

George Randolph Barse studied in Paris between 1878 and 1884 with Cabanel, Boulanger and Lefebvre. Among his decorative paintings is ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1 June 1873, in Chicago; died 1953, in Beverly (Massachusetts).

Painter, decorative designer.

Frederick Clay Bartlett studied in Munich and in Paris in the studios of Louis Joseph Collin and Aman-Jean. He took classes with Whistler at his short-lived Paris school before returning to Chicago in ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 17 May 1865, in Chillicothe (Ohio).

Draughtsman, decorative designer, writer.

John Bennett studied at the Art Students League in New York and at the Cincinnati Academy. He wrote and illustrated The Pigtail of Ah Lee Ben Loo (published 1928...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, female.

Born 1875, in Jamaica Plain (Massachusetts).

Painter, miniaturist, decorative designer.

Ethel Blanchard studied under Frank Benson, Halle and Edmond Tarbell. She was a member of the Society of American Miniaturists and a teacher. In 1901 she became a member of the Copley Society....

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 15 December 1848, in Brooklyn (New York City); died 12 October 1936, in New York.

Painter, mosaic designer, writer. Allegorical subjects, figures, portraits, decorative schemes, genre scenes. Murals.

Edwin Howland Blashfield studied in Paris under Léon Bonnat (1867-1869, 1875-1880), and received guidance from Jean-Léon Gérôme and Henri-Michel-Antoine Chapu. He studied the decorations of Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, Jean-Paul Laurens and Paul Baudry in the Panthéon in Paris. During a trip to Englandin 1887, Blashfield associated with Anglo-American artists Edwin Austin Abbey, John Singer Sargent, Lawrence Alma-Tadema and Frederic Leighton. He returned to the USA in 1881. He later travelled to Italy to see frescoes, and also visited Switzerland, Germany and Belgium. Blashfield was President of the National Academy of Design....

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 25 March 1867, in Bear Lake or Ovid (Idaho), to Danish parents; died 6 March 1941, in Chicago.

Sculptor, painter, illustrator, decorative designer. Figures, portraits, historical subjects.

Gutzon Borglum, brother of Solon Borglum, was born to a Mormon father with two wives, and he lost contact with his mother when his father left the religion and decided to conform to society's norms for marriage by abandoning her. Borglum studied at St Mary's Academy, Kansas City, in ...

Article

American (?), 19th – 20th century, female.

Died 1948.

Painter, illustrator, decorative designer. Genre scenes, urban landscapes.

Harriette Bowdoin was active in New York around 1909-1910.

New York, 1 June 1983: Street Scene, New York (c. 1915, oil on canvas, 27 × 22 ins/68.5 × 55.7 cm) ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born March 1875, in New York; died 1952.

Painter, decorative designer.

Alexander Bower studied at the Fine Arts Academy and the School of Arts and Crafts in Philadelphia. He was a member of several societies and a corresponding member of the Philadelphia Academy....

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b Boston, MA, July 10, 1868; d La Mesa, CA, Jan 25, 1962).

American book-illustrator and designer of posters, typefaces and furniture. In 1893 Bradley began designing for Vogue magazine. He subsequently worked for Ladies’ Home Journal, and in 1901–2 published an influential series of eight articles on ‘The Bradley House’; the designs in these articles (and another three in 1905) seem not to have been implemented, but they nonetheless exerted a seminal influence on public taste and on subsequent furniture design; his designs for pianos were used by Chickering & Sons of Boston. Bradley also designed two series of plates for Royal Doulton: ‘Golfers’ (...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1848, in Berlin (Connecticut); died 1922, in Farmington (Connecticut).

Painter, decorative designer, illustrator.

Robert Brandegee studied under Jacqueson de la Chereuse in Paris. In 1907, he became an associate member of the National Academy of Design, New York. Brandegee was awarded a medal in 1901....

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1869, in Malden (Massachusetts).

Painter, engraver, illustrator, decorative designer.

Harold Brown studied at the Massachusetts Art School, the Cowes Art School in Boston and under Jean Paul Laurens and Gérôme in Paris. He was awarded a bronze medal at the Pan American Exhibition in Buffalo in ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 18 October 1861, in New York; died 1941.

Painter, decorative designer. Figures, portraits.

Leslie Cauldwell studied under Boulanger and Carolus-Duran at the Académie Julian in Paris. He lived and worked in New York. From 1896 he specialised in decorative work....

Article

Merrill Halkerston

(b Portland, ME, March 4, 1832; d New York, March 26, 1920).

American painter, interior designer and writer. Colman grew up in New York, where his father, Samuel Colman, ran a successful publishing business. The family bookstore on Broadway, a popular meeting place for artists, offered Colman early introductions to such Hudson River school painters as Asher B(rown) Durand, with whom he is said to have studied briefly around 1850. Having won early recognition for his paintings of popular Hudson River school locations (see Storm King on the Hudson), he was elected an Associate of the National Academy of Design in New York in 1854. Most of Colman’s landscapes of the 1850s, for example Meadows and Wildflowers at Conway (1856; Poughkeepsie, NY, Vassar Coll., Frances Lehman Loeb A. Cent.), reveal the influence of the Hudson River school. An avid traveller, he embarked on his first European tour in 1860, visiting France, Italy, Switzerland and the more exotic locales of southern Spain and Morocco. His reputation was secured in the 1860s by his numerous paintings of romantic Spanish sites, notably the large ...

Article

Betzy Dinesen

Term applied to an architectural and interior design style prevalent in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in the USA and Australia, countries formerly colonized by Britain. The style, used mostly for domestic architecture, was based on buildings of early colonial periods and had much in common with the contemporary Neo-Georgian tendency in Britain (e.g. Annie Longfellow Thorp House, 1887); later developments on the west coast of the USA drew on Spanish styles. It became popular in response to a reaction against the ornate eclecticism of late 19th-century architecture and the search for a new aesthetic: Colonial Revival was promoted as a ‘national’ style, rooted in the foundations of the nations and suited to their environment and culture. A similar stimulus produced revivals of colonial styles in other countries, such as South Africa, where the Cape Dutch style was revived in work by Herbert Baker around the end of the 19th century, and Brazil, where features of Portuguese colonial architecture appeared in the work of ...

Article

Arnold Berke

(b Pittsburgh, PA, April 4, 1869; d Santa Fe, NM, January 8, 1958).

American architect and designer. Raised in St Paul, MN, Mary (Elizabeth Jane) Colter graduated in 1890 from the California School of Design in San Francisco, then taught mechanical drawing at a St Paul high school and contributed to local Arts and Crafts societies as lecturer and craftswoman. These pursuits nourished Colter’s love of Native American art and the Southwest, interests also fostered by her first professional projects—the interior of the Indian Building at the Santa Fe Railway’s Albuquerque station (1902) and the Grand Canyon’s Hopi House (1904), modeled on an Indian village. She completed both for her lifelong employer, the Fred Harvey Co., the famous purveyor of travel services, which hired her full-time in 1910.

Colter designed hotels, train stations, tourist attractions, restaurants and shops—at the Grand Canyon and along the Santa Fe line. She based her designs on Native American and Hispanic cultures and on the western landscape, and, through rigorous research, fashioned environments to charm the leisure traveler. The most dramatic is the Watchtower (...

Article

Robert M. Craig

Early 20th-century American manifestation of the late 19th-century international Arts and Crafts Movement and similarly grounded on the ideas of John Ruskin and William Morris. The Craftsman Movement married Ruskin’s concept of an architectural morality with Morris’s ideal of art as quintessentially “doing a right thing well,” and called for artists to embrace the idea that the worth of an object is inherent in the pleasure in its making. Led in America by furniture maker Gustav(e) Stickley, the movement preached honesty in materials, elimination and simplification in design (as a reflection of a simpler life), and an integration of art and beauty into domestic life. A non-elitist craft of building embodying values of handiwork and “pleasure in labor” would result in a democratic architecture of good character available to the Everyman.

Stickley designed and manufactured furniture, and published designs for houses as appropriate settings for his honest and straightforward oak tables and chairs and built-in bookcases. He illustrated his work and point of view in ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 12 August 1863, in Le Roy (New York State); died 12 June 1942, in Northampton (Massachusetts).

Painter. Figure compositions, genre scenes. Decorative schemes.

Francis James Day was a pupil of the Art Students' League in New York. While in Paris, he studied under Antoine Hébert and Luc Olivier Merson at the École des Beaux-Arts. He joined the Salmagundi Club in ...