1-15 of 15 results  for:

  • Sculpture and Carving x
  • Twentieth-Century Art x
Clear all

Article

Barbara Barsch

[Koehler, Otto]

(b Blumenau, Brazil, Feb 6, 1904; d 1995).

German sculptor . He studied at the Bauhaus in Weimar under László Moholy-Nagy and Oskar Schlemmer from 1923 to 1924; he emigrated to Czechoslovakia in 1935, where he was co-founder and director of the Oskar-Kokoschka-Bund. He lived in London from 1939 to 1947 and then returned to Berlin, where he taught at the Hochschule für Bildende und Angewandte Kunst (1950–58). In East Germany Balden was seen as developing a modern idiom within the context of naturalism, somewhat in the manner of Henry Moore. Even his early works, such as Beaten Jew (1943) and Reminder (1946; both Berlin, Staatl. Museen, Neue N.G.), show his interest in expressive form and his liking for sculpture ‘containing space’. He always created socially-orientated works based on his own beliefs about the independence of the individual, as in the Karl Liebknecht monument (1968) in the Marktplatz, Luckau.

R. Hoffmann: Theo Balden...

Article

German, 20th century, male.

Born 1905, in Velbert (Rhineland); died 1986, in Wuppertal.

Painter, engraver, sculptor, watercolourist, photographer.

From 1929 to 1931, Batz studied sculpture at the Bauhaus School (school of design founded by Walter Gropius). He also studied painting under Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee. Staying for a time in France and Switzerland, from ...

Article

Bauhaus  

Rainer K. Wick

[Bauhaus Berlin; Bauhaus Dessau, Hochschule für Gestaltung; Staatliches Bauhaus in Weimar]

German school of art, design and architecture, founded by Walter Gropius. It was active in Weimar from 1919 to 1925, in Dessau from 1925 to 1932 and in Berlin from 1932 to 1933, when it was closed down by the Nazi authorities. The Bauhaus’s name referred to the medieval Bauhütten or masons’ lodges. The school re-established workshop training, as opposed to impractical academic studio education. Its contribution to the development of Functionalism in architecture was widely influential. It exemplified the contemporary desire to form unified academies incorporating art colleges, colleges of arts and crafts and schools of architecture, thus promoting a closer cooperation between the practice of ‘fine’ and ‘applied’ art and architecture. The origins of the school lay in attempts in the 19th and early 20th centuries to re-establish the bond between artistic creativity and manufacturing that had been broken by the Industrial Revolution. According to Walter Gropius in ...

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 1919, in New Orleans; died 1985.

Painter, sculptor.

Fritz Bultman studied at the New Orleans Art and Craft School and then at the New Bauhaus in Chicago from 1937 to 1938 and finally with Hans Hofmann in Provincetown from 1938 to 1940...

Article

Dutch, 20th century, male.

Born 21 July 1920, in Amsterdam.

Painter (gouache), sculptor, potter, watercolourist, draughtsman. Figures, portraits, flowers, animals.

Groups: International Situationist, CoBrA, International Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus.

Having studied at a school of industrial art and at the fine arts academy in Amsterdam between 1940 and 1942, Constant began his career as a painter with works described as 'experimental' from 1945. In 1947, he joined the short-lived Surréalisme Révolutionnaire movement, as a result of which he met the Dane Asger Jorn. In 1948, he wrote the manifesto of the experimental Dutch group based in Amsterdam in the form of the magazine ...

Article

American, 20th century, female.

Born 31 March 1911, in Madison (Wisconsin).

Sculptor, collage artist.

Marie Zoë Greene-Mercier studied at the New Bauhaus, founded in Chicago by Moholy-Nagy and Archipenko after their exile. The architectural quality of her abstract sculptures and her taste for group creations, as well as the way she incorporated her personal work in built ensembles, undoubtedly had their roots in her Bauhaus training. She also made collages, drawings and reliefs, sometimes published in multiples. She took part in a large number of group exhibitions from ...

Article

Canadian, 20th century, female.

Born in Quebec.

Sculptor.

Suzanne Guite studied at the Bauhaus in Chicago with Moholy-Nagy in 1947 and 1948, then with Archipenko in 1949, and received advice from Brancusi. She spent time in Florence in 1951, before moving on to Mexico, where she created frescoes. Her sculptures are generally human figures made in wood or stone, and are intended to express their inner spirit....

Article

German, 20th century, male.

Born 1897, in Würzburg; died 1981.

Painter, sculptor.

Hans Haffenrichter was a student of sculpture at the Bauhaus from 1921 to 1924, and then studied at the fine art Kunstakademi in Copenhagen in 1925. In 1927 he directed the Weg (Way) art school in Berlin, then went on to teach in Elbing (now Elblag, Poland), Berlin again, Heidelberg and Wiesbaden. He lived in Chiemsee....

Article

Danish, 20th century, male.

Active also active in France.

Born 3 April 1914, in Veirum or Vejrum (Jutland); died 1 May 1973, in Aarhus.

Painter (including gouache/mixed media), watercolourist, collage artist, sculptor, lithographer, potter, draughtsman. Designs for tapestries.

Groups: International Situationist, CoBrA, International Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus...

Article

Daniela De Dominicis

(b Rome, Jan 28, 1935; d Marseille, Sept 21, 1963).

Italian painter, sculptor and urban planner. In 1955 he obtained his diploma at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Rome and began studying architecture, heavily influenced by Walter Gropius, the Bauhaus and De Stijl. He started work as an industrial designer in 1958. He also began to execute works devoted to the study of the dynamic qualities of light in space, which some people have seen as a forerunner of conceptual art and Minimalism. Lo Savio’s first monochrome paintings, based on the study of chromatic transparency, date from 1959 (e.g. Space-Light, Leverkusen, Schloss Morsbroich) as do his Filters series, which comprised layers of opaque and semi-transparent paper squares and circles. Works of this sort were shown in the same year in a group exhibition with Franco Angeli, Tano Festa, Mario Schifano (b 1934) and Giuseppe Uncini at the Galleria L’Appunto in Rome, and in 1960 at the Galleria La Salita in Rome with an exhibition catalogue prefaced by the French critic ...

Article

Martina Rudloff

(b Berlin, Feb 18, 1889; d Burgbrohl, nr Cologne, Nov 13, 1981).

German sculptor, potter, draughtsman and printmaker. He first sculpted animals while studying under Richard Scheibe (from 1907), and in 1910 modelled animals for the Schwarzburg Porcelain Factory. After World War I his interest in classicism gave way to the influence of Expressionism and of the Sturm artists, as part of a search for a new spirituality. This new style of work can be seen in Woman Suckling (gold-plated limewood relief, 1919; Bremen, Marcks-Haus). Walter Gropius, who founded the Bauhaus in Weimar in 1919, asked Marcks to establish a ceramics workshop for the school in the nearby village of Dornburg. With his students he set out to create a Bauhaus ceramics ethic of simplicity and honesty of design as determined by the materials used and the function of the object. In stylistic terms he combined geometry with a local pottery tradition. He was also inspired by Lyonel Feininger to make woodcuts of rural genre themes....

Article

Terence A. Senter

(b Bácsborsod, Mohol Puszta, Hungary, July 20, 1895; d Chicago, Nov 24, 1946).

American painter, sculptor, photographer, designer, film maker, theorist, and teacher, of Hungarian birth. Moholy-Nagy’s importance in the 20th century is based as much on his theories as on his practical work. His ideologies related to the relationship between space, time, and light, and the interaction of man with these forces. His great achievement was that he applied his mystical outlook to highly practical enterprises and always recognized the purpose behind his creativity.

Moholy-Nagy’s ambition developed when he exchanged village life for the city of Szeged after his father left his family. Academically outstanding, Moholy-Nagy read law for a year at Budapest University before joining the artillery in World War I. Influential praise for his war sketches converted his aspiration from literature to art. His Expressionist style, social conscience, and investigation of light paralleled trends in the Hungarian avant-garde, from ...

Article

British, 20th century, male.

Born 30 April 1928, in London. Died 22 May 2011.

Painter (including gouache), engraver, weaver, jeweller, sculptor.

Breon O'Casey, son of the Irish playwright Sean O'Casey, learned metalwork from ex-Bauhaus teacher Naum Slutski while attending Dartington Hall School near Totnes in Devon. In ...

Article

Whitney Chadwick

(b Berlin, Oct 6, 1913; d Berne, Nov 15, 1985).

Swiss painter and sculptor of German birth. She studied in Basle at the Kunstgewerbeschule from 1929 to 1930. After seeing an exhibition of Bauhaus work, including that of Paul Klee, at the Basle Kunsthalle, Oppenheim produced her first Surrealist work, a series of pen-and-ink drawings in a school notebook. Oppenheim’s earliest works reflect the influence of Klee and the artists of Neue Sachlichkeit. She moved to Paris in 1932 and studied briefly at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière before meeting the Surrealists through Alberto Giacometti and Hans Arp the following year. Oppenheim quickly became known as the perfect embodiment of the Surrealist woman, the femme-enfant, who through her youth, naivety and charm was believed to have more direct and spontaneous access to the realms of the dream and the unconscious. She was celebrated by the Surrealists as the ‘fairy woman whom all men desire’. Man Ray posed her nude with an etching press in a celebrated series of photographs that includes ...

Article

Karin von Maur

(b Stuttgart, Sept 4, 1888; d Baden-Baden, April 13, 1943).

German painter, sculptor, choreographer and stage designer. After the death of his parents he lived with his sister at Göppingen, and in Stuttgart from 1903 to 1905 he served an apprenticeship at a workshop specializing in marquetry while attending classes at the Kunstgewerbeschule. He continued his studies on a bursary from 1906 to 1911 at the Kunstakademie in Stuttgart under the plein-air landscape painters Christian Landenberger (1862–1927) and Friedrich von Keller (1840–1914). In 1911–12 he lived in Berlin, where he produced paintings such as Hunting Lodge, Grunewald (1911; Stuttgart, Staatsgal.) and Self-portrait (1912; Stuttgart, Staatsgal.) under the influence of Cubism. After returning to Stuttgart, Schlemmer studied under Adolf Hölzel, whose theory of pictorial methods made him a pioneer of abstract art and who gathered around him an international circle of students that included Willi Baumeister and the Swiss artists Otto Meyer-Amden and Johannes Itten, with whom Schlemmer became friends....