1-2 of 2 results  for:

  • 1600–1700 x
  • Architecture and Urban Planning x
  • Religious Art x
Clear all

Article

Dutch, 16th – 17th century, male.

Born 15 May 1565, in Utrecht; died 15 May 1621, in Amsterdam.

Painter, sculptor, medallist, architect. Religious subjects, portraits. Monuments, funerary monuments, busts.

Amsterdam School.

Hendrik de Keyser the Elder was taught by the sculptor C. Bloemaert in Dordrecht, and the painter Abr. Bloemaert. He was awarded the freedom of the city of Amsterdam on 24 October 1591, and was an architect to the town in 1594. He married on 6 August 1591, and had four sons and two daughters. Three of his sons - Pieter, Thomas and Willem - became artists. He taught Hans Stenwinckel. His architectural masterpiece was the tomb of William of Orange in the church in Delft. His sculptures include ...

Article

Michael Ellul

Maltese family of silversmiths, architects and designers. The first recorded family member is Carlo Troisi (fl 1697–1736), followed by Andrea Troisi (fl 1750), Pietro Paolo Troisi (?1700–50) and Massimiliano Troisi (fl 1794). A silver sugar bowl (1775–97; London, Mus. Order St John) is attributed to Aloisio Troisi, probably a member of the same family. During the 17th and 18th centuries various members of the Troisi family filled the post of Master of the Mint of the Order of St John of the Knights Hospitaller. The Mint was established in Valletta, Malta, in 1566. The best-known Troisi silversmith is Pietro Paolo, who was also an architect. His best work is the Altar of Repose, which he designed for Mdina Cathedral, and which was constructed by the Maltese painter Francesco Vincenzo Zahra in 1750. It is a magnificent Baroque scenographic creation in wood executed in a masterful ...